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Author Topic: Re: timber framing  (Read 1585 times)

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Offline Farmer 28

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Re: timber framing
« on: March 27, 2012, 10:29:35 PM »
Hi I am brand new to this forum Is this where I can ask ? about timber framing?

Offline Farmer 28

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2012, 10:43:00 PM »
Well Here I  go I tore down a 1917 post and beam barn and I was looking for suggestions to make sure i am going about my project the right way. I am planning and pressure washing the wood which I believe is pine then I am going to use borate to insecticide  the wood even though I seen no sign of insect and I have handled all this wood plenty. Then i am going to rework it shrink it down then I am going to store it in a water tight semi with two air vents I am going to stack and sticker all the wood. Any advice is welcome I am new to this forum but plan on being here for a while thanks farmer

Offline Rooster

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2012, 11:23:41 PM »
Farmer,

Welcome to the Forum!

Are you planning on building a "green living roof"?  If not, you might want to start a new thread about your project and then include any information or questions there.  Also, if you look back in the long list of threads, you might find some answers to questions that you haven't even thought of yet.

Good Luck!

Rooster
"We talk about creating millions of "shovel ready" jobs, for a society that doesn't really encourage anybody to pick up a shovel." 
Mike Rowe

"Old barns are a reminder of when I was young,
       and new barns are a reminder that I am not so young."
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Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2012, 11:35:07 AM »
Farmer:
I moved your question to it's own thread.

As far as you question goes, I have to ask, why do you want to pressure wash it?

If you do it could remove the color of the wood and sometimes that's what people want, the natural aged look.

If you want to wash it to get it clean and remove any bird droppings and such then don't pressure wash it, just wash it with a regular garden hose. Make up a pail of soapy water and get a regular scrub brush and wet the timber, wet the brush with the soapy water and rub it down. Then rinse with the garden hose to get the soapy water and dirt or bird droppings off.

After it has air dried some then move it to the trailer.

I hope that helps you some.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
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Offline Farmer 28

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2012, 07:09:29 PM »
Thanks for the advice Jim I have read many of your post.  The reason I am going to pressure wash the wood is because half of the barn was for dairy cows and has carbola on the wood like a white wash.  Do you agree with the borate for insecticide and if so any advice on the mix and a good supplier and is that all you think I should do to it for storage.  Eventually I am going to maybe put a polyurethane on the wood do you agree?  I am planning on reusing the rafters and floor joist do you think I should put borate on them also?  Do you think that storing everything in a vented semi is a good idea?  It make take a few years until I am able to rebuild the barn?  Thanks for the help.
Farmer

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2012, 07:27:10 PM »
I don't have any experience with any chemicals on woods. Sorry I can't help you with that.
I don't know if it would be a good thing or a bad thing. You may need to do more research or wait for more replies.
It may depend on what your end use will be, that is you may not want chemicals on the timbers if it's going to be made into someplace where chemicals will be a problem for the future users of the structure/barn.
Do you see insect damage? Active insect damage. Is the small sawdust piles under the timbers from the insects pushing it out their holes?

I think they could be stored in a semi once they are dried out from your washing. You don't want to put them away wet and hope they will dry out in there. They may not dry out without good air flow through the stacks.

Jim Rogers
 
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline jander3

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Re: timber framing
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2012, 08:21:58 PM »
I use penetreat and borax (from the supermarket) for bugs. 

Here is a suggestion from a log builder near Ely, MN.   


Mildewcide/fungicide: We sometimes use a copper-based product known as Mitrol PQ-80 (from ISK Biocides in Memphis) for inhibiting the inevitable mold, mildew and sapstain in logs right after peeling. Simple household borax, sodium tetraborate decahydrate, in powdered form mixed with water and brushed onto the logs (rather than sprayed), also works well. "Twenty-Mule-Team Borax" at the grocery store will do the job. Whatever biocide, fungicide, or mildewcide you choose, be sure to keep it out of reach of children and pets at all times. To better keep the borax in suspension, introduce it into boiling water, then add more borax. It does not need to be used hot.


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