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Author Topic: Future of Paper?  (Read 2763 times)

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Offline Dom

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2012, 08:55:04 AM »
Aditya Birla owns the local mill and rayon is the product they produce. The company is also ranked first in the production of viscose staple fibre textiles, worldwide. Everyone needs clothes, and I know rayon feels nice. It doesn't make good towels like cotton, but makes good dish rags. I use rayon dish rags all the time. I've yet to weave with it, but I know on the weaving forums lots of folks use it all the time. It's the one mill around that I see hiring new staff everyone once in awhile. Currently they are hiring an operations manager for the woodlands.

That's good to hear.

Offline Jamie_C

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2012, 10:41:07 AM »
Our province ( Nova Scotia) recently bought our paper mill's assets for $1.00 (CDN).

The mill, the woodlands (543,000) acres, wood generated power plant, shipping docks etc.

One of the conditions of the sale was they will never use the facility to produce paper again.

It looks like the woodlands may be managed under the Community Forests system. It is 4 % of our whole province land mass.

The mill facility is going to be turned into an experimental base for value added products made from
cellulose.

Quite an exciting project for sure, so they think there is life after paper....

The other trade off was that the government got the liabilities for the pension, which is currently underfunded at 118 Million or some sort. So the $1 figure will end up costing us alot more in the future. With that being said, I think its good that NS bought back the woodlands. Hopefully it will be properly managed for future generations.

The mill in Port Hawkebury also received provincial funding, approx $30 M if memory serves me right.

I'm not too crazy about our governments tactics to fund the private industries, as its often a short term gain only. There are many entrepreneurs in the area that would need funding to begin their business and they want to do it in NS, yet our government is more keen to fund multi nationals who'll quickly move out if there are greener pastures.

When all the smaller mills were closing in Canada in the late 2000's, the same number of mills were opening in South Africa and South America.

Right now the paper industry is being revamped, and it will take time and effort for things to stabilize.

It's closer to $130 million given to Stearn Partners so they could purchase the mill in Port Hawksbury for $30 million ... Only the government could make sense of that kind of deal.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #22 on: December 19, 2012, 10:49:50 AM »
The Irvings generate some power. The NB government buys it at 7.5 cents a KW and sells it back to the Irvings for 4.5 cents. Can't be any more convoluted than that. Good way to attempt to cover up subsidies. Guess what they use the power for? the pulp mill. ::)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline captain_crunch

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2012, 04:00:34 PM »
Hang in there paper may come back yet. Been told Air Lines cant dump plastic off planes in Eroupe have to haul it home. but wooden spoons and paper are compostable and can be dumped there
M-14 Belsaw circle mill,HD-11 Log Loader,TD-14 Crawler,TD-9 Crawler and Ford 2910 Loader Tractor

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2012, 04:35:13 PM »
Knowing how some companies are they save $5 per trip to use plastic,but it cost them $15 to handle it 2-3 times.  :-\
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline harrymontana

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    • ipe brazilian redwood and tigerwood deck and flooring
Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2012, 10:46:23 AM »
I understood that paper made from hemp is very good quality paper and you do not need to cut valueable trees for that while hemp groes virtually for free. Hemp is no the same as mariuhana by the way
everything on hardwood

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Future of Paper?
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2012, 05:02:17 PM »
The trouble is, it take land away from food production. And when you grow most crops unless it a legume, you still have input costs. It's not a free system. They tried it here, it failed. ;) If I want to grow trees, I don't have to do anything but harvest them. I don't even need to thin or add fertilizer, the trees will still grow. Leave a field fallow around here and trees will take that over without a dime being spent. And species that they buy all the time, such as aspen and spruce.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry


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