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Author Topic: American elm?  (Read 3709 times)

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Offline Peacock

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American elm?
« on: April 11, 2013, 05:58:47 PM »
Cut quite a bit of this lately.  All healthy trees removed for ROW.

  

 
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Offline Peacock

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2013, 08:15:14 AM »
I'd read somewhere that the creamy white layers in the bark indicate American elm.  It's stringy, heavy and wet.  Just like any elm I've cut, save for the dead standing variety.
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Offline S.Hyland

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2013, 09:00:30 AM »
It looks like elm to me. I see it occasionally in my area. What are you planning to do with it?
It may be that when we no longer know which way to go that we have come to our real journey. The mind that is not baffled is not employed. The impeded stream is the one that sings.
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Offline Peacock

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2013, 05:09:54 PM »
It'll be firewood.
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Offline WDH

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2013, 05:23:05 PM »
Those creamy layers in the rhytidome (inner bark) are present in american elm but not in red elm (slippery elm).  Put that in your bag of tree ID tricks  ;D.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2013, 05:51:30 PM »
The stuff rots fast too. The mushrooms seem to love it. :D But there was a 48" white elm that died nearby in the late 80's and there isn't hardly any sign of it left now. Pretty much all soil. I suppose it's been 25 years now.
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2013, 07:45:16 PM »
Elm by it's very nature makes some of the best split resistant planks you can think of .Besides that it will bend like a  noodle under heavy strain that would break oak .It gets lighter as it dries out whereas oak always stays heavy as if it were made of lead .

Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2013, 08:47:57 PM »
Those creamy layers in the rhytidome (inner bark) are present in american elm but not in red elm (slippery elm).  Put that in your bag of tree ID tricks  ;D.

Winged elm has the creamy layers, too! :)
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Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2013, 08:49:04 PM »
Elm ... gets lighter as it dries out whereas oak always stays heavy as if it were made of lead .

Your oak must be a lot different than mine, because mine gets a lot lighter as it dries out.
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2013, 09:04:47 PM »
Probabely so but mine was pretty dry when it was cut and it's still heavy as lead after 6-8 years of air drying .

I've got a set of red oak planks ,4 by 12 by 8 feet long that were cut close to 30 years ago .I have a tough time lifting them now .Of course I'm a tad older too.

Offline SPIKER

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2013, 09:34:30 PM »
One thing it seems the "RED" (Slippery Elm) seemed to live a lot longer, I have some big ones on my place that are recent dead due to the bugs.   there are some white/winged elms too but they live about long enough to drop seeds for a year or two then croak.

Other uses were for barn floor, stall walls/fence in old days & wagon sides/floors.   the RED ELM does stand up well to rot vs white though not as resistant as white oak on the rot scale.   Hear tell there were some other uses for it but been so long ago I can't really remember what it was.   It takes getting wet & drying out repeatedly & retains strength (springy as mentioned) probably why it was used a lot for barn floors.   

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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2013, 09:35:52 PM »
Those creamy layers in the rhytidome (inner bark) are present in american elm but not in red elm (slippery elm).  Put that in your bag of tree ID tricks  ;D.

Winged elm has the creamy layers, too! :)

But winged elm has wings. Which means if you see the wings, you can only confuse it with----
Sweetgum.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2013, 04:15:03 AM »
Probabely so but mine was pretty dry when it was cut and it's still heavy as lead after 6-8 years of air drying .

I've got a set of red oak planks ,4 by 12 by 8 feet long that were cut close to 30 years ago .I have a tough time lifting them now .Of course I'm a tad older too.

If they are dried down to 12% MC they are no heavier than hard maple or beech. They have a lot more water in them when green than either the other two. Just look at the physical data which is posted in various tables and the Wood Handbook. 45 lb/ft3 when @12 % MC. Lots of old tales and myths out there. ;) I've lifted lots of hard maple planking in a potato shed. We used them over head the bins for flooring, so we could roll a bin piler in onto them. The piler was set up to deliver taters to a 20' long vertical drop shoot where the taters dropped into to fill up the bins. I don't remember them 3" thick planks being too light.

The shoot was in 2 foot sections that you unhooked as the bin filled. The fun part was if the shoot plugged and you had a shower of taters raining down on ya. I don't miss any of that crap one bit. :D
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2013, 04:19:40 AM »
But winged elm has wings. Which means if you see the wings, you can only confuse it with----
Sweetgum.
 :snowball:

What if your just looking at logs and blocking like in the photo? Sometimes we don't have all the pieces to solve the mystery (ie. leaves and twigs, sometimes no bark either). ;)
Move'n on.

Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2013, 11:14:44 AM »
But winged elm has wings. Which means if you see the wings, you can only confuse it with----
Sweetgum.
 :snowball:

What if your just looking at logs and blocking like in the photo? Sometimes we don't have all the pieces to solve the mystery (ie. leaves and twigs, sometimes no bark either). ;)

And winged elm doesn't always have wings. The wings are bigger and more obvious on young, vigorous trees. Mature, slow-growing specimens often have no wings at all.
"There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey." -John Ruskin

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Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2013, 07:28:50 PM »
Love the smell of fresh cut elm. Reminds me of being 5 years old. :) :) :)
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2013, 07:35:06 PM »
A lot of people would consider the smell of white elm to be like horse urine. Thus given the label **** elm.  ::)
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2013, 08:12:55 PM »
Horse pee quite truthfully probabley smells better than elm sawdust or oak for that matter .Maybe a pole is in order .

I hereby nominate Swampish to be the official smeller of both the sawdust plus the horse pee ,I need a second . ;D

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2013, 08:17:52 PM »
Well I don't know what the pole will be used for, unless your putting up a flag. Maybe you'd rather take a poll instead. ;D
Move'n on.

Offline WDH

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Re: American elm?
« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2013, 08:22:09 PM »
I have met many a wingless winged elm. 
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