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Author Topic: My timber frame build  (Read 56893 times)

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #360 on: June 17, 2018, 07:34:08 AM »
Probably said it all ready in this thread,but you have rocks like me. And the rocks grow around the stumps and roots too. ;D  I have big ones I can not move. And way too many that I can move. ;D
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Offline Magicman

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #361 on: June 17, 2018, 08:16:26 AM »
Thanks for the updates John.  Lotsa small steps add up.  8)
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #362 on: June 30, 2018, 12:55:13 AM »
Update 6/23-29/2018:
Had two half days (Saturday & Sunday - 6/23-24) working on re-setting up the mill.  Before:


 

 
I added two 5 foot sections between my three "hard" track section that  each have 4 2,000lb leveling jacks.  I also added some parking track on each end for the mill head.  That gives me a total of 58' 9" of track.  The head consumes 4'5" so in a perfect world, I could mill a 54'4" log.  After:


 
I reversed the cut direction as well.  The sawdust used to be deposited on the near side, the same as the slab and boards - what a mess.  Cutting the other way, all the sawdust is up against the trees and the wood is much easier to manage.

In scrapping down the grade about 6 or 8" I did find a few rocks...  I used them to fill in between the bigger rocks/boulders.


 
Monday, 6/25, I put a 22' log on the mill that looked like it might have some rot.  Well, it did and some splits.  I got one 2x10x12' usable board and 91 stickers.  I also got some 8x12x24 blocks for cribbing.  They came in handy for the next log.  I loaded up the 53' log I got from a neighbor.  I need a 51' 8x12 beam so I cut off a little of the butt end that had a swell on one side.  I still couldn't lift the whole log with my SkyTrak.  So I lifted one end and drug it over to the mill and set it up on some blocking with one end over the mill.  I lifted the other end until the opposite end touched the bunk and placed it on the mill.

Upon closer examination (now that the bark was all off), there was a break about 6 feet from the end when it was felled.  There is a vertical break to the left of the knot, travels to the left (to middle of pic) and then up to the top of the picture.


 
So I cut it down to 40' - enough to do 3 of the 4 spans for the main floor beam.  Also, with the bark off, I saw this:


 
So I spent the rest of the day cutting around and digging it out.  The "base" of the bracket was buried 6 1/2" into the tree.  It was completely enclosed in wood.  After pulling out the insulator:


 
At first, I thought it might be a big ring spike nail - but I was wrong.  I worked on it until dark.

Tuesday, 6/26, I used my metal detector and found the other end of the bolt.  Quite a few years ago (30 to 40?), the insulator was through-bolted to the tree.  I had to dig out the bolt head from the other side.  As it turned out, it was a 1/2" threaded rod with big square backing plates.  Would not have been fun to cut into!


 
This is the 40' beam in progress with two sides cut.


 

I was still able to get my 8x12x40' beam.  There is a big black square stain from one of the plates that ended up on the side surface of the beam with the 1/2" hole through the middle of the beam.  I might reassemble the insulator and stick it through the hole in the beam once the cabin is up.  I also cut four 2x10x24' floor joists and a number of 2x10s for roofing boards and some long 1x4s for strapping.  A total of 745 bd-ft from one log, but it did take all day.  Flipping it over to make cuts was no small feat!  And getting into my basement was an exercise with my SkyTrak as well.

Tuesday evening, I spent a couple hours taking apart and repairing 3 ice breaks in my tankless water heater.  Apparently, disconnecting the water lines and pulling the drain plug didn't winterize it.

Wednesday, 6/27, I re-installed the tankless water heater only to find the pump has a small crack in the housing.  I'll either have to find a new housing or buy a new pump.  Then I finished up the side wood from Tuesday and stacked it.  I had two trees (too close to the cabin for my comfort) that were also limiting my solar for the water pump. I got two logs (24' and 8') from one tree and three logs (24', 10' and 8')  from the second tree.  I basically cut the logs where a whorl significantly reduced the log diameter.  Plus I need some 2x10s at 24' and some 8x8 and 8x10 posts at 22'.  I staged them for Thursday.

Thursday, 6/28, I cut the first (skinnier) 24' log and got my 8x8, a 2x10, a 2x6 and some 1x4s.  Since my track is so long, I loaded up the other 24' log and the 10' log that I may get to on Friday.  My SkyTrak has two leaky hydraulic cylinders so I drove down the hill to borrow a tool to work on the repair and to pick up a lot of hydraulic oil.  One cylinder is the side tilt - a small 6" diameter x 24" long that I will just remove and take in.  The other is one of the boom lift cylinders.  It has a 3" rod in a 5" cylinder about 6 or 7 feet long.  I plan on just removing the rod/piston and have that rebuilt like I did on a different cylinder.

Friday, 6/29, I added 30 gallons of hydraulic oil and then removed the cylinder and rod from the SkyTrak.  The 3" rod is about 7' long.  Not too awfully heavy but pretty difficult to handle being very slippery!  The leveling ram was more trouble - the bottom pin was a little difficult to pound out, both because of a little rust and access.  Got that done in about 3 hours, including doing some clean up of oil soaked dirt.  I decided not to slice up the logs but cleaned up the bark I peeled from the 53' log.  That was a lot of bark!  Dropped off the parts at the hydraulic shop on my way home.  Hopefully it will get done by Thursday.  I will be going back up the hill on Friday for another week.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline Magicman

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #363 on: June 30, 2018, 08:05:46 AM »
Sounded like a very busy but productive week.  It's good that you spotted the fracture in the 53' log which was caused by the tree landing on an uneven surface when it fell.  :-\

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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #364 on: July 15, 2018, 02:28:50 AM »
July 6-13

Friday, 7/6
Dropped my son off at camp, he is staff this year.  I was on call to haul the food delivery up in a trailer along with other pickups. The Sysco truck arrived about 1:30 pm and we were able to load all the food in 3 pickups and one SUV so I was not needed  :-\  Got back to the cabin a little after 3 and decided not to start working on anything.

Saturday, 7/7
Formed up and poured the top of the supports for the main floor beam.  


 

 
Milled up the two logs I had sitting on the mill.  One 25' log gave me a 8x10 and some 2x8s, a 2x6 and some 1x.  The other 10' log gave me one 8x8.  It was a nice straight 12" SE so 4 cuts and done!  Moved all the wood except the 8x10 since my SkyTrak is still down waiting on hydraulic repairs.  Sure takes a long time when my manual mill is in full manual mode :-\

Sunday, 7/8
Hauled 4 "candidates" to camp along with about 50 backpacks in a big cage trailer.  A 6 mile trip on a "4x4" road that took 40 minutes to go up.  Base elevation is 5,600 and camp is at 7,300.  Got back to the cabin at noon.

There was an old foundation adjacent to my property that had a lot of rebar sticking up.  I took my sawsall to it and now I don't have to be quite so careful where I drive!  This rock has been a pain ever since I started my cabin.  I tried a couple times with the SkyTrak to fork it out, but no go.  


 
So I dug around it with my backhoe.  Quite the beast.


 
Was debating whether to just dig a deeper hole or pull it out.  When I get the SkyTrak up and running again, I'll see if it will pop out now.

Monday, 7/9
Did a little more rock work (waiting for my SkyTrak repairs :-\)


 

 
Maybe put the big rock here?


 
Then I decided to clean out and re-grade the area past my pump.  It was an extension of my driveway where I stored my scaffolding parts and planks.  When I dug down my driveway last year, this area was up a foot or so and caused water to pond in front of it.  So I scraped back the fine gravel and dug down with my backhoe and graded with my quad.  I needed to go another 6" or so but 2" down was a big flat rock (so I thought).


 
It was way too big for my backhoe to lift so I had to dig a ramp and slide/roll it up and out.  This will go nicely in the rock wall on the north side of the foundation.  Now my driveway should drain properly.


 

 
Got a message from the hydraulic shop - my job was finished so I'll drive down the hill to get my parts in the morning.

Tuesday, 7/10
Put the SkyTrak back together again!  Took about 2 hours to reinstall the tilt ram (easy) and insert the 7' boom lift rod (much easier than I thought) by myself.  Now its a nice, dry machine again!  Pulled the big rock out with the SkyTrak and it was struggling.  Since it is supposed to be able to lift 9,000 pounds and it could just barely lift this 5' granite ball, I'd say it was at least 9k.  I decided it was too big to incorporate into my rock wall and also because if I lost control of it, it would roll at least a 1/4 mile down the hill!  So I put it up on a rocky pedestal for a climbing boulder.


 
It shouldn't be moving again until the next glacier.  And did more rock wall work.  Kind of addicting.  Don't have to search too far for rocks - usually just a few inches down...

Wednesday, 7/11
Played lumberjack.  Cut down a number of trees and bucked them into various beam and post lengths.  I need a few more 8x8 and 8x10 posts in 12, 15 and 20 foot.  I also need 22 foot 2x10 for my floor joists.  This tree gave me two 22' logs.


 
The second log will only give me a 8x8 but also some shorter side stuff.  The first log should give me a 8x10 and a couple 2x10s, maybe more.  I think this was a pair of 22s and a 16 or 17'.


 
I also need some shorter floor joists for where the stair well is coming up from the basement.  The butt log had a funny side branch coming out at 8 foot almost parallel to the trunk.  Just the right length for the joists (in back of picture). The next log on the tree should make a 8x10x14' post and then a 8x8x20'.


 
And the tops that will make something...


 

I hate to admit but I have not walked my entire property.  I've only traveled the easier parts.  I took down some dead and dying (from the 4 years of drought) trees today and ventured into "unknown territory".  That is where I found a couple of these trees.  I think I also found a sleeping area for the deer I keep seeing in the mornings.  I will be clearing a number of sad looking trees just below my cabin for both fire protection and so I can have a panoramic view of these great looking ones!


 

 
The pictures don't do them justice.  They are truly massive trees towering over 200' and 5 to 6' DBH.

Thursday, 7/12
Put the 20' 8x10 away now that I got the SkyTrak back up and running.  Then I was able to edge the side lumber with the mill freed up.  Recut the 40' 8x12 down to two 12' and one 15' 8x10's.  Will cut a new 51' 8x12 for the basement.  Cut up the fat 8' log and got eight 2x10s and eight 1x4s.

Friday, 7/13
Had my Niece, her husband and their 6 year old daughter up for the day to help.   It was the best weather day.  I was having a week of 85F days but Friday was overcast into the early afternoon and temps in the 70s.  We did manage to get 3 logs done.  Two 8x8x22' and one 8x10x15' posts with a number of 1x4x20' strapping and a couple 2x10s & 2x8s.  They worked very hard, said they had fun and wanted to do it again!

 

 

 
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #365 on: July 15, 2018, 05:11:58 AM »
All looks good. I have one friend that likes to help too. For some reason he calls before he comes over now. Wants to make sure that I am not running the sawmill or building. :D  I guess those 4X8X14 hemlock right off the mill was hard on him.
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Offline fishfighter

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #366 on: July 17, 2018, 07:59:37 AM »
Hey, thanks for the updates. Nice place you have.

Offline Magicman

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #367 on: July 17, 2018, 08:27:18 AM »
Hey, I loved the updates and especially the pictures.  One step at the time is very descriptive of your progress.   smiley_thumbsup
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #368 on: August 01, 2018, 01:15:04 AM »
Update 7/31/2018:

Went up Sunday evening with plans to meet a guy to buy his beam saw.  He had an old Makita for $200.  Last minute he flaked out.  So I had a backup.  This guy wanted $350 for his new style Makita with a spare blade.  Ended up having a third new (in the package) blade.  That sure is a big saw!  Heavy, too.  I need to cut 6" deep x 3" wide slots in the sides of my sills to place Simpson straps as required by my engineer to secure my knee bracing.  I was not looking forward to using my Skilsaw and/or a chainsaw with chisels.

Spent Monday breaking down the stacks of 2x10's, x8's and x6', trimming to even foot lengths and sorting by width & length.  At the bottom of a pile was some 2x10's that went way crooked.  As I was cutting them down to firewood lengths, they would crack and explode-split.  A bit of stress, I'd say! :o

Started with this:


 

 
and ended cleaned up like this:


 

 
with 3,110 bd-ft of roofing boards.


 
Another 2,700 to go :-\ Not pictured was 4 (FOUR) 55 gallon drums filled with stickers.

But now, I also have a place I can cut and store my cedar sills (6@ 8x14x25') and later cut the joints.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #369 on: August 01, 2018, 08:11:09 AM »
Congrats on the saw and the nice lumber/timber whacks.  8)
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Offline tburch

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #370 on: August 03, 2018, 10:50:05 AM »
You must be stacking all that by hand.
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #371 on: August 03, 2018, 11:00:36 AM »
You must be stacking all that by hand.

The individual sticks, yes.  Well, sometimes my feet to kick them into place. ;)  The bundles, no.  I have my little orange helper in the background there...
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #372 on: August 10, 2018, 12:50:05 AM »
Update 8/9/2018:

Well, not on the cabin...  I picked up a load of Hardi-plank like siding off of CraigsList yesterday.  It was 65 pieces 48" long x 16" "cedar shakes" in random width and length.  I installed them on the two sides of my bath house I put up a couple years ago. ::)  I still have 18 full sheets left and quite a few scraps.  I might have enough to complete the back side.  The front side I still have some of the narrow (5-") clap boards that could fill out the peak - or I could use the shakes - not sure what route I want to go.
 

 

 
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #373 on: August 10, 2018, 04:52:38 AM »
I feel the shakes would look good.
But if have a wife,better ask her.
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Offline DWyatt

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #374 on: August 10, 2018, 07:08:38 AM »
That is the same exact siding my parents put on their house 8ish years ago when they added on, it is very nice stuff! Looking good! :)

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #375 on: August 10, 2018, 10:23:38 AM »
Part of the reason in doing the bath house now was to test out some new tools I picked up last year off of Amazon.  PacTool makes the Gecko Gauge (various models, mine was all aluminum) and the Manual Fiber-Cement Shear (SS211).

The Gecko is a pair of clamps that clip on to the last course of siding to support the next with the appropriate reveal.  They are adjustable (moving a bolt), quick, easy and strong.  The only problem I had was with the varying length of the "shingles" used above, it took a little fiddling and a level to get them right.  When I do my cabin with regular lap siding, these will really help out.

The manual shear is a paper shear looking thing.  It has a 1/8" thick blade that removes a strip of the siding as you cut.  There is a removable straight edge fence to hold your siding, but with my 16" wide siding, I had to remove it.  The siding tends to slide a little bit away from the blade as you cut, so, again, when I'm doing the cabin, it will have the fence installed and will give me accurate and FAST cuts.  It will cut a 8" board in 2 seconds leaving a clean edge on both pieces.  And no dust flying around!

I have no affiliation with PacTool but I've done a number of jobs with concrete siding using circular saws to cut and trim and constructed story boards to help with installation (I generally work alone).  These two tools are worth the price!
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #376 on: August 15, 2018, 12:05:50 AM »
Update 8/14/18:

Finished up the bath house siding but still need to caulk, paint and add the drip edge.  What I have up there was just some scrap I had laying around.  I used up all but one of the random shake boards on the back.  The random shake was already painted with a semi-gloss grey.  I'll do the trim in white.


I have some little pieces that I'm going to "glue" on with caulking under the lower window and on either side of the upper window.  I'll pre-drill some holes and use some nails to tack them up.  Can't use the nail gun on small pieces - they just explode.

So, I had to use the regular clap boards for the front.


It's ok and I can always redo it if I find some more of the random shake.

In doing this, I've decided I would never do a full house with the random shake.  I find it too disturbing - I like more order!
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline IMERC

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #377 on: August 15, 2018, 06:04:09 AM »
 I like that... A LOT!!!
Who ever invented work didn't know how to fish.... Here fishy fishy....

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #378 on: August 15, 2018, 11:09:13 AM »
Way back on post #42 (Bath House) is the start of the bath house frame.  It has 3" of rigid foam insulation and it is amazingly cool whenever I go in there on the hottest days.  In the 3 years its been there, I have not slept in the loft - my friend's cabin is much more comfortable!  That top window is for the loft.  However, I have used the shower many times.  A 32" shower has reaffirmed my decision to make my shower stall big in the cabin!  The roof is aluminum siding from a semi trailer.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

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Re: My timber frame build
« Reply #379 on: August 30, 2018, 01:37:36 AM »
Update 8/29/18: (and prior week)

I finished off the last two bigger logs making some 8x8 and 8x10 timbers along with some 2x10s and 2x8s last week after I finished up the bathhouse.  Monday I milled up the 5 logs in front I cut a few weeks ago. They were all small diameter so I made 4x6 girt and brace stock along with quite a bit of 1x6s and a few 1x4s.


 
Today I said goodbye to this nice cedar.  It's too close to my cabin so it has to go.  :-\


 

I dug around with my Davis backhoe and the forks of the SkyTrak and then used the SkyTrak to push it over. On the ground.  Measured it at 82'.  It came down about 10 off of where I wanted.  I was shooting for right on the driveway but I couldn't get the SkyTrak in at the correct angle to offset the natural lean.

 

 
I was trying to figure out where I would find enough rocks to fill the gaps on my rock pile around the foundation.  All the browner rocks were from today's little dig. ;D


 

 
The larger rocks in the foreground can only be moved by the backhoe.  The smaller rocks in the shadow of the wall is about 5 wheelbarrow loads of softball to football rocks.  There were more in the root ball.  The very short stump on the root ball was all the SkyTrak could lift.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.


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