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Author Topic: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors  (Read 2747 times)

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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2014, 08:40:31 PM »
Thats what I did , only the mill that did the cutting can certified the lumber.
A&P saw Mill LLC.
45' of Wood Mizer, cutting since 1987.
License NH softwood grader.

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2014, 09:11:24 AM »
Jim, what about reclaimed?  Ever dealt with that?  Especially if the timbers were milled 100 years ago.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2014, 11:57:13 AM »
Jim, what about reclaimed?  Ever dealt with that?  Especially if the timbers were milled 100 years ago.

NeLMA has told us (a gathering of timber framers at a guild conference) that they will not grade salvaged timbers. There is no way to tell what internal stresses have been placed on the timbers while they were being used over the last 100 years.

The TFEC (timber framers engineering council) is working towards getting information that can be used to grade reclaimed timbers. It is not something that is easy to do.

Jim Rogers
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Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline timberwrestler

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Re: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2014, 09:44:47 PM »
The workshop at the Heartwood School last week dealt with reclaimed timbers.  I think that those in attendance (which included a lot of the big wigs of timber frame engineering) are pretty confidant with grading timbers with joinery and older timbers.  It was the first workshop covering those subjects.  I believe that they're planning on doing it again next year, perhaps at the Forest Products Lab.

Offline dustyjay

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Re: Getting a Timberframe Home "Blessed" by building inspectors
« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2014, 12:51:32 PM »
I am back to building.

We took a break on our house project when the 1828 house I want to buy came on the market. I'd been through trying buy it before and we got as far as a signed purchase and sales agreement, before being killed by a low appraisal. Price was going to be $245K but house appraised at $140k, with house unusable as collateral. The seller was unwilling to negotiate a different price, so we backed off for the winter and drew up plans for a new house.
 Ironically enough, on the day I saw the first milled beams for my sawmill, the old house was put on the market. I put house building on hold and offered $175k for a house valued at $140k. I was turned down, no counter offer. My feelings for this old lady are beginning to run towards anger.

But I'm back to being focused on building. I have all my permits, and estimates for power and well are looking like under $25k for both. I'm going to drag my feet on things for the summer, in case things change.

I will be cutting the frame though, and can't wait to get started.
Proper prior planning prevents pith poor performance


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