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Author Topic: Northern Long-Eared Bat  (Read 1250 times)

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Offline Gary_C

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Northern Long-Eared Bat
« on: November 11, 2014, 04:24:59 AM »
Northern Long-Eared Bat Facts

Forest Resources Association

Overregulated:  Protecting the Northern Long-Eared Bat

Impact:  Classifying the Northern Long-Eared Bat as Endangered, and designating Critical Habitat for it governed by broad seasonal restrictions on operations, would severely damage commercial forest management and the wood supply chain without addressing the root causes of the threat to the species.

Financial Impact:  Suspending harvesting and forest management activities for six months of the year in, potentially, 39 states would devastate wood supply businesses, the industries they support, and the forests and communities they sustain.

Status:  Communications to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service from members of Congress, from state Departments of Natural Resources, and forest users have influenced the Agency to postpone a decision on potentially listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat as Endangered until April 2, 2015. FRA is working with other organizations representing forest users to provide comments to the record influencing the listing proposal.  The public comment period on the decision to list will conclude August 29, 2014.  Communications from members of forest-dependent communities to public officials, including members of Congress, about the potential impacts a decision to list the Bat will be helpful.

The Issue:  The epidemic of white-nose syndrome has reduced the numbers of the Northern Long-Eared Bat significantly and seems likely to reduce them further.  Although this obvious threat to the speciess survival throughout its 39-state range is severe, its contagion is associated with groupings of the bat in the caves in which it hibernates, not with open habitat in which it roosts and rears young.  Nonetheless, biologists associated with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service state that an Endangered listing, under Endangered Species Act criteria, would entail designation of Critical Habitat throughout its range, and prohibit any activity defined as harassing it during the approximately six-month roosting period (April through October)potentially restricting or eliminating timber harvest or other forest management activity, along with other land-based activities such as farming and mineral extraction.

Forest owners, timber harvesters, and mills are concerned about the effects of such a policy on forest industry viability; its irrelevance to the source of the crisis (the fungal-originating disease, not habitat disturbance); and the unintended consequences of curtailing forest operations. Such consequences may include conversion of land from forest, and actual loss of bat habitat, due to forest lands loss of economic value.



This proposal by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service could shutdown logging in the 6 months of the summer nesting season. The Northern Long-Eared Bat has become the new Spotted Owl that has crippled logging in the Pacific NW. The Endangered Species designation is now a serious threat to logging. There are some powerful interests fighting this threat but you never know what could happen.
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline barbender

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2014, 09:29:16 AM »
There's a lot of talk about this issue up here, Gary. I sure hope they make the right decision.
Too many irons in the fire

Offline OneWithWood

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 02:13:54 PM »
The regulations surrounding the Indiana Bat have hampered logging here in Southern Indiana, which is prime Indiana Bat hibernacula.  Adding the long-eared bat will make the restrictions state wide.
I am all for protecting wildlife, spend a good deal of my time doing just that, but these restrictions seem to me to be over the top.  As the article states, the restrictions due nothing to address the root cause of the bat decline. 
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Offline CCC4

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2014, 02:48:19 PM »
This is fixing to affect my area as well!  don't cut a tremendous amount of FS timber so I shouldn't be affected right off the "bat"...see what I did there?  :)

Here is my problem with this....

#1, it seems as if over educated tree hugger save the whales and apply sunscreen to polar bear types have got the wrong idea! These bats live in the timber right??? So why allow logging during the months the bats are hibernating in the timber??? Why not switch the cutting to Summer months and let them relocate before Winter comes??? OMG WOW...really??? Who figured this out...some dumb logger from Arkysaw none the less. But this is what we are dealing with people...a bunch of book worms making poor decisions at the risk of disrupting peoples lively hoods. It shouldn't take a college grad to understand and realize my point.

How to deal with this problem...

Go caving with cotton over alls...get them all messed up and full of White nose spores and drag the clothes through the woods where ya don't want bats to be! LOL! Yay! Problem solved! Had they in the PNW put woodpeckers and owls as a tasty treat in 5 star restaurants...they wouldn't be dealing with the problems they have been! LOL!

The other day I was cutting in a draw and was wading through some tops, I of course had no shirt on and while limbing a top I felt something scratching my side. I looked down expecting to see a walking stick er something and to my surprise it was 2 long eared bats!! They had climbed my chaps and we headed up my side. I played with the one for a few minutes and eventually went on my way.

Hope they come up with a better plan of action for saving these bats!

Offline coxy

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 04:57:21 PM »
some people are just plan batty ;D

Offline David-L

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2014, 05:15:16 PM »

It's like trying to trap beaver here in Mass, You can't use the Cony 330 anymore due to the Animal rights lovers.Well i am not going to post what a struggling beaver looks like after being in a  live cage trap for 23.5 hrs and sitting in 40 degree or less temperature water only then to be drown or shot, then harvested. Sounds humane, right!!!!.

                                        David l
In two days from now, tomorrow will be yesterday.

Offline treeslayer2003

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2014, 05:29:10 PM »
just what we need, another critter that don't need our help stopping all work. its pretty bad here and i am a little bitter about it.

Offline redprospector

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2014, 06:19:53 PM »
Heck, at least a bat has hair.
Around here they use butterfly's, and salamanders to stop timber sales. Oh, of course we have the "Mexican Spotted Owl" too.
Back in the 80's the Chief of the Mescalero Apache Tribe (right next to us) was under scrutiny by the enviro-wacco's when a reporter asked him what his plan was to protect the Mexican Spotted Owl. He simply answered; "Well, I think we've done alright without the dinosaur. So I don't think we need to worry too much about that owl."  :D
1996 Timber King B-20 with 14' extension, Morgan Mini Scragg Mill, Fastline Band Scragg Mill (project), 1973 JD 440-b skidder, 2008 Bobcat T-320 with buckets, grapple, auger, Tushogg mulching head, etc., 2006 Fecon FTX-90L with Bull Hog 74SS head, 1994 Vermeer 1250 BC Chipper. A bunch of chainsaws.

Offline treeslayer2003

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2014, 08:33:43 PM »
salamanders yes...........no butterflys yet.........give um time, they'll find one don't live no where else.

Offline redprospector

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2014, 09:02:18 PM »
salamanders yes...........no butterflys yet.........give um time, they'll find one don't live no where else.
Hahaha. If they can't find one, they'll make one up.  :D
The butterfly that they use here is actually found in 48 states I believe. But the kicker is that many of them are "sub-species". The butterfly is the Checkerspot Butterfly. Some smart aleck named this one the "Sacramento Mountain Checkerspot Butterfly and it is found no where else, because if you see one in the White Mountain range then it would be a "White Mountain Checkerspot Butterfly". The name is the only difference.
1996 Timber King B-20 with 14' extension, Morgan Mini Scragg Mill, Fastline Band Scragg Mill (project), 1973 JD 440-b skidder, 2008 Bobcat T-320 with buckets, grapple, auger, Tushogg mulching head, etc., 2006 Fecon FTX-90L with Bull Hog 74SS head, 1994 Vermeer 1250 BC Chipper. A bunch of chainsaws.

Offline Autocar

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2014, 09:48:46 AM »
I sure hope some body dosen't put the raccoons on the list I threw one out of a tree yesturday there just about as thick as yellow jackets  :D
Bill

Offline Gary_C

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2014, 10:06:25 AM »
Nonetheless, biologists associated with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service state that an Endangered listing, under Endangered Species Act criteria, would entail designation of Critical Habitat throughout its range, and prohibit any activity defined as harassing it during the approximately six-month roosting period (April through October)potentially restricting or eliminating timber harvest or other forest management activity, along with other land-based activities such as farming and mineral extraction.

That is the real scary part of this issue. The question is how can "biologist associated with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service" be given so much power over forestry, farming and mineral extraction industries?
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

Offline mesquite buckeye

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2014, 11:02:00 AM »
My guess it is less about bats and more about exercising power and control over yet another group of citizens trying to make a living on their own. >:(
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Offline M_S_S

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2014, 12:26:41 PM »
Yep the spotted owl just about killed logging northern Calif. Mills closed, whole towns disappeared. Then they found out the barred owl was killing the spotted ones so the powers that be hired shooters to kill the barred owls. Our government at work lol. Ed
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Offline treeslayer2003

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2014, 07:53:09 PM »
salamanders yes...........no butterflys yet.........give um time, they'll find one don't live no where else.
Hahaha. If they can't find one, they'll make one up.  :D
The butterfly that they use here is actually found in 48 states I believe. But the kicker is that many of them are "sub-species". The butterfly is the Checkerspot Butterfly. Some smart aleck named this one the "Sacramento Mountain Checkerspot Butterfly and it is found no where else, because if you see one in the White Mountain range then it would be a "White Mountain Checkerspot Butterfly". The name is the only difference.
yea, like the delmarva fox squirrel is different than any other fox squirrel..........wonder if the squirrel knows that?

Offline treeslayer2003

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Re: Northern Long-Eared Bat
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2014, 07:55:21 PM »
Yep the spotted owl just about killed logging northern Calif. Mills closed, whole towns disappeared. Then they found out the barred owl was killing the spotted ones so the powers that be hired shooters to kill the barred owls. Our government at work lol. Ed
they say the buzzards here starve cuz the bald eagles eat all what the buzzards used to eat...........wonder if they send shooters for them?


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