The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Newbe interested in timberframing.  (Read 5269 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JoeyLowe

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 392
  • Location: Gilmer
  • Gender: Male
  • "In the German Tradition"
    • Share Post
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2004, 01:17:08 PM »
Hi Jeff:

Tell me moer about your chain morticer.  I've been thinking of buying one and most likely will, but it sure would be nice to know how they really perform.  Did you get different sized chains?  Do you have an extra chain?  What about sharpening the chain?  Enquiring minds want to know!! ;D
--
Joey Lowe

"Working towards perfection has to be a part of anything one does.  You've got to put yourself into it." ... Sam Maloof (chairmaker)

Offline Mobilesawyer

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Location: Merrickville, Ontario
  • Gender: Male
  • Mobile s-a-double u - yer
    • Share Post
    • The Mobile sawyer
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2004, 05:28:33 PM »
Hey Joey:

The chain morticer works beautifully. I don't have huge miles on mine but the the instructor of the work shop we host has used the same Makita morticer in his framing business for many frames and even he is amazed at the longevity of the machine. In operation the morticer is simple, align  it to your layout lines, clamp it to the beam, plunge cut and then cant the head two more positions. The system usually has to be reclamped to cut a 2" by 7" mortice but the process is fast and simple. The more time you spent working with the machine the faster you get. As for the chains well the standard 23/32" chain works just fine and I don't see any reason tro own any other size unless you need smaller mortices. Our local saw shop sharpens the chains for $12.00 CDN. and it will easily cut three or even four 16x20 buildings.
My suggestion, if you are building more than one frame buy one because if you don't need it any longer the used market for them is strong but once you own a sweet tool I find them hard to part with. You should also talk to KMS because they sell them at a great price and will ship state side.

Offline JoeyLowe

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 392
  • Location: Gilmer
  • Gender: Male
  • "In the German Tradition"
    • Share Post
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2004, 08:00:03 AM »
Jeff:

Thanks for the info on the morticer.  I have seen them on ebay for around $1200.00 (USD) but before I part with that kind of money, I wanted to make sure that they were what they claim to be.  In my opinion it is nice to know the old way of doing things because it helps you understand how a power tool will speed things up.  I have put one on my Christmas list.

Regards,

Joey
--
Joey Lowe

"Working towards perfection has to be a part of anything one does.  You've got to put yourself into it." ... Sam Maloof (chairmaker)

Offline Timber_Framer

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 303
  • Age: 58
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2004, 09:03:38 AM »
Ive been drooling over a chain morticer for years now, however I got lucky and found an old drill stand for $30.00 at a yard sale. So I load it with  either a 2 or a 1 self feed saw tooth forstner bit and hog out the mortises. It can be a pain resetting it for each cut and there is a bit more clean out, but it is $1170.00 cheaper then the makita ;D
"If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles."

Offline logman

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 287
  • Age: 61
  • Location: Fleetwood, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • M&K Timber Works
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2004, 03:55:42 PM »
I bought a Makita chain mortiser right from the get go when
I started to cut my frame.  I plan to cut more frames so I
looked at it as a business investment.  I bought mine from
Bailey's.  They had the best price at the time that I bought
it.  
LT40HD, 12' ext, 5105 JD tractor
M&K Timber Works

Offline JoeyLowe

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 392
  • Location: Gilmer
  • Gender: Male
  • "In the German Tradition"
    • Share Post
Re: Newbe interested in timberframing.
« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2005, 08:08:16 AM »
Just thought I would revisit an old topic here.  I have had my chain morticer for a few months now and it performs as stated above.  The increased speed surely removes a lot of the tedium of hogging out mortices.  You still have to put the final touchs on with a chisel, but a sharp chisel makes short work of that too.  I ordered a second chain on Tuesday and it showed up on Weds. (Not bad turnaround).  We sent the first chain out to be resharpened yesterday and was told that it takes about a week to get it back. 

I decided to give the slick a good sharpening yesterday. so I broke out the plate glas plate, various and sundry grits of sandpaper and emory cloth and had it.  Less than 30 minutes later, I was "making paper" with this fine tool.

Oh, by the way, Timberwolf sent me a new catalog with some of their other tools that are available and I immediately began drooling over one in particular, the Protool portable bandsaw.  Does anyone have on these bad boys or has anyone seen one in action?  They are used for cutting arches and decorative molding profiles.  Short of hand carving, what are some methods that the old timers used instead of a bandsaw?  Just curious. 
--
Joey Lowe

"Working towards perfection has to be a part of anything one does.  You've got to put yourself into it." ... Sam Maloof (chairmaker)


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

thumbup
Newbe to Sawmilling

Started by Babaloui on Sawmills and Milling

14 Replies
2713 Views
Last post March 15, 2011, 08:29:59 PM
by fishpharmer
xx
Newbe here with new WM LT15

Started by plowboyoo51 on Sawmills and Milling

8 Replies
872 Views
Last post September 20, 2014, 07:29:12 AM
by WDH
xx
Newbe in Illinois - Looking to say hi and get suggestions...

Started by Schramm on Sawmills and Milling

12 Replies
1046 Views
Last post December 26, 2012, 09:25:34 AM
by board
xx
I am A newbe that has jumped in with both feet.

Started by Mt406 on General Board

10 Replies
704 Views
Last post August 20, 2013, 04:56:48 PM
by drobertson
 


Powered by EzPortal