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Author Topic: Sharpening a ripping chain  (Read 6250 times)

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Offline beauj5

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2016, 07:06:13 PM »
No, I haven't yet. I went 10 because that's what the Oregon products chart suggested. I'll try 0 degrees on an older chain that I have that needs touched up and when I try it out, I'll post it here.
When the road forked, I went straight.

T540xp, 562xp, 034 super mag, 044, 460, 576, 056 super mag, ms460, 066, ms880, 090.

Offline footer

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2016, 11:11:55 AM »
I have some 0 degree (from Balies), and used it for a few big logs. 48 inch + red oak, running a 60 inch bar and 084. With the bar so much longer than the log diameter, I didn't cut 90 degrees to the log because I was standing on top cutting down. I only had the log blocked up about 6 inches off the ground. The chain is full comp, not skip. The saw seems to handle it OK, but Im not sure if I tried cutting full width at 90 degrees to the log, how it would work.

Offline DonnerParty

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2016, 11:11:16 AM »
0 degree top plate angle works fine, but less than 0 will pull the cutter sideways the wrong way and won't cut well or leave a good finish. 10 or 15 cuts just as well, and is much easier to see and maintain a constant top plate cutter angle.

Offline DonnerParty

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2016, 11:13:08 AM »
I have some 0 degree (from Balies), and used it for a few big logs. 48 inch + red oak, running a 60 inch bar and 084. With the bar so much longer than the log diameter, I didn't cut 90 degrees to the log because I was standing on top cutting down. I only had the log blocked up about 6 inches off the ground. The chain is full comp, not skip. The saw seems to handle it OK, but Im not sure if I tried cutting full width at 90 degrees to the log, how it would work.

As you bring the saw off of 90 degrees, you start pulling longer strands of grain rather than short cuts directly across the grain. Lots of people call this "noodling". This puts less strain on the saw, and also works better with a slightly higher top plate angle.

Offline beauj5

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2018, 02:06:35 AM »
So the 0 degree grind was a pain to get to from the original 30 degree, mainly because I had to file back a ways to get past the damage caused by the railroad spike I hit, and then it took awhile to get the rakers back down.  Once I got it to 0 degrees, it really didn’t “feed” well into the wood and almost didn’t want to go at all.  So, after some looking, I believe that one side was “past” 0 degrees, and so the cutters were maybe trying to cut on the inside first versus the outside.  So, I went back and reground the whole dang thing again to just shy of 5 degrees (maybe (2.5) and what I ended up with wasn’t much different than the 10 degree angle.  The cut was smoother than 30 degrees, but not any different really compared to the 10 degree.  In summation, for what I’m doing, the 30 stock angle on the round ground cut fast and efficient, is easy to maintain, and leaves a nice finish that cleans up easy with a planer if needed.  One thing to note, though, is if you are looking for a smooth easy finish, even pressure with the saw across the entire log will get good results. When you start “see sawing” the saw, that’s when the uneven chain and bar marks really show up, which, for some applications is really cool.
When the road forked, I went straight.

T540xp, 562xp, 034 super mag, 044, 460, 576, 056 super mag, ms460, 066, ms880, 090.

Online Skeans1

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2018, 04:50:51 PM »
Just curious how many of you have tried square chisel chains for ripping?

Offline dogone

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2018, 12:10:41 AM »
Just finished four six foot cuts in a 28 in poplar using a 20 inch bar. My old husky 154 powered through but it was work. It is a pro saw but 55 cc was not really enough. I polished the ports and opened the muffler so it burns gas like a hog. First time using a beam machine and I really like it. I can see a bigger saw and a chainsaw mill in the future.
  I stopped to fuel up often and used compressed air to cool the saw. I used both a new rip chain and regular chain ; didn't notice any difference.

Offline Don P

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2018, 07:55:24 AM »
One thing that has come to mind as we've wandered down the log with plenty of time to think. If you think about the log as a bundle of long straws, when you are cutting straight across the log you are cutting off the ends of the straws. If the engine is leading you are chipping your way down the straws, if the nose is leading you are brushing the straws back down as you cut. Those last 2 are sort of like brushing against the way the fur grows and then with the way it grows. Just stuff that passes through ones head. I'm curious if anyone has noticed much difference in that angle of attack. I'm not to noodling just square, leading or trailing.

Offline thelogsmith

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2018, 11:37:48 AM »
Don if what your asking is one way faster than the other, in my experience no. And that's using a double ended bar w/ a 2100 on each end. Also comparing ripping chain to standard we've had better luck with ripping chain as far as speed goes(It wasn't huge, but every little bit helps). You'll learn to become one with your sharpener after you hit a nail and have 221 dl of .404 needing attention
tk1400, husky 2100's, a 298, 372's a 357 and a token stihl. john deere 317 skid steer. cut it twice and its still to short!

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2018, 06:16:53 AM »
With chisel chain you'll get better results if you can hold about 30 to 45 degree angle of attack .It won't be cutting noodles to clog you up and it won't be pulling saw dust to dull the chain and be slow as molasses in January .You've got to play with it a little bit to finger it out .

Online Skeans1

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #30 on: May 08, 2018, 07:21:04 AM »
I don’t do any milling like you guys are but have squared off alder or Doug fir in the brush for spring boards or as part of a job and I don’t remember feeding issues with square chisel like round chains. How far are you guys dropping your rakers? The few times I had to slab a side off I dropped the rakers pretty good on an old falling chain then she would self feed enough I’d have to hold her back some.

Offline Don P

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2018, 07:41:35 AM »
We've been playing with it, .040 is pretty good, we dropped to around .050 last time and it worked well on the Lucas slabber, that is probably too much for the Alaskan. It depends on width, hardness and hp. When it gets too much it snags and hangs up too much, too little and it takes too much pressure to make dust. Rounding the leading edge of the rakers helps as well. None of this is gospel just where we're at now.

Offline homestead090

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Re: Sharpening a ripping chain
« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2018, 10:54:36 PM »
I'm using 404 chains at 10 degrees and getting very smooth cuts as long as you don't rock the mill back and forth. I'm using Granberg chain (made by Carlton) and some NOS Stihl Ripping chain I got off ebay. As far as a saw, the more power the better. It will also let you cut without moving the mill around a lot, or at least be tempted too. I'm using a Stihl 090 and just bought a second one off ebay. I saw you said it wasn't a good time to buy a big saw now, just for reference. I just got the second 090 for $650 including shipping. It is missing a few parts but you can get Chinese parts for this saw very cheap and many of them don't matter as far as performance goes (clutch covers, caps, handles, etc). An 090 goes for $1,200-$1,500 on average for just a running decent saw and way more when they are pretty. What I got it for is the low end of what I see them going for. It was one that was relisted after not meeting it's reserve price. I messaged the seller and they excepted the offer. If you keep your eyes open for the saw you want, and are patient, you can get a good deal. I've got some videos of the 090 milling if you are interested or considering what saw to buy. It's old but powerful, 137cc, lots of torque. Mine has the governor removed so it keeps its speed up, carb tuned accordingly, but not too high rpm. It's a heavy saw, and you feel it moving around but I once you're in the cut it doesn't matter. I like that it's all metal. I'm sure an 880 or the 3120 is nice, but running the old saw is fun and from videos I've seen, I'm milling faster, especially in the big stuff. Back to your topic, I think anything much more than 10 degrees is going to dull way to fast, I think 30 degree or any normal cross cutting angle would not last long at all, maybe not even on cut in big wood without dulling, especially if it is at all dirty. I can take several wide cuts before I can notice any difference. Each chain will last me about 1 big log (3-4 foot diameter hardwood, white oak for example). I got two logs with walnut but was moving slow toward the end, better to sharpen, better for the bar as well so your not pushing really hard and wearing things out. Sorry for all the rambling, but I know when I was making decisions, I wanted a lot of info! Good luck.
Furniture maker and wood collector.


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