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Author Topic: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC  (Read 1817 times)

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Offline 123maxbars

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Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« on: January 15, 2017, 01:53:05 PM »
I have spoken with a few sawyers on and off this board and wanted to get some more opinions.  This is some lumber from some old barn logs that were brought to my mill to be sawed into lumber. The customer (whom I am not doubting) thinks they are old chestnut logs from the barn he took down. He said all the siding was chestnut.  The barn was taken down in east TN.  He build custom furniture out of chestnut and is usually spot on.  The end grain does not show any medullary rays either.  He said this is pre blight chestnut logs. The logs are all around 8 to 11in in diam. Very small trees when they were harvested.  The light color has me being skeptical. What you your thoughts? Thanks for any comments in advance.


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Offline kelLOGg

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2017, 02:19:33 PM »
Looks like pine to me. The odor of freshly sawn old pine should be telltale.
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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2017, 03:35:37 PM »
Your friend may well be right. I've seen chestnut that looked like that.
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Offline POSTON WIDEHEAD

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2017, 05:35:19 PM »
If that is Chestnut, I have a lot of Pine that looks just like it.
But thinking of you I hope it is Chestnut.  :)
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Offline Ox

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2017, 05:51:56 PM »
Looks kinda like hemlock.  Been many years since I've milled any so my memory is probably lacking...  Does hemlock even grow in TN?
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Offline 1ruralmailman

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2017, 07:27:57 PM »
   my thoughts are hemlock as well.whats the weight usually hemlock would seem light in old stock as compared to chestnut.

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2017, 07:43:12 PM »
I've not come across chestnut that I have id'd.  I've been told it looks like white oak but if you look at the end grain you will not see the rays radiating our from the center like you do in white oak.
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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2017, 07:52:27 PM »
I resaw a lot of wood from old barns in that area.  Looks like the pine I get to me.
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Offline Hewer of Wood

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2017, 08:30:30 PM »
I have very little experience with some of the yellow pines so can't really speak to that, but it looks like it could be ash. The very little chestnut I've handled was darker, and much less dense than ash.
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Offline VTwoodworker

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2017, 08:35:16 PM »
I think it is most likely chestnut.  I always think it looks like a combination of ash and butternut.  The chestnut timber harvested after the blight I think is often darkened from standing dead and bug infestation.  I don't have any experience resawing chestnut - wish I did. 

Offline nativewolf

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2017, 09:10:09 PM »
Might I suggest moving this to the section of the forum that helps people with tree ID?  WDH is a moderator there that seems to be top notch. 

That said, just slice a bit of end grain off.  Pine and other conifers will have resin tubes, can't miss them.  Chestnut will have a very distinctive end grain appearance and you can google it to veryify.  Truly tree end grains are very very telling in most cases and you can almost always get the right family if nothing else. 
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Offline 123maxbars

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2017, 08:56:43 PM »
I am sure it is not pine, I finished up the timber today and I think it is pre blight chestnut. Smells a lot like oak. I have attached a pic of the end grain also.
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Offline Peter Drouin

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2017, 05:44:45 AM »
At the end grain Look at the holes/ veins if it's  tear drop shape it's Chestnut. Round is something else.
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Offline WDH

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2017, 07:42:28 AM »
Looks like chestnut to me. 
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Offline qbilder

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2017, 09:33:11 AM »
My vote is chestnut. Lots of chestnut structures in that area and the wood in your pics looks exactly like chestnut. If it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck.......
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2017, 09:40:56 AM »
I think that you need a new sawblade.   :D
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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2017, 08:11:31 PM »
Those tyloses can be rough on a blade. 
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Re: Help ID old barn log/lumber UPDATED END GRAIN PIC
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2017, 09:47:59 PM »
Quote
Tyloses

a blister-like protrusion of xylem parenchymal cells that obstruct the vessels or, less commonly, the tracheids. Tyloses form when the closing membrane of a pit grows into the lumen of a vessel. The cytoplasm and, sometimes, the nucleus of the cell move into the protrusion, which is not separated by a septum from the mother cell. Tyloses may be filled with starch, calcium salts, resin, or gum. Although they are most characteristic of woody plants, they also occur in herbaceous plants, such as pumpkin, purslane, and dock. Tyloses lower the water-retaining capacity of the heartwood and increase resistance to rotting and penetration by fungi. The formation of tyloses is sometimes a response to injury.

Calcium oxalate crystals, I did not know that... is that the culprit?
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