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Author Topic: Coon, possum, horse?  (Read 6242 times)

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Offline Josef

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #60 on: September 26, 2017, 01:13:37 PM »
On my wife's first trip to France with me on a work trip she decided to visit a local street market and shop for dinner, her comment about the experience was that all the butchered rabbits were hung with their hind feet still attached, the vendor said it was a hold over from WWII when it was not uncommon to sell cats as rabbits, not possible if the feet are still there.

I've eaten most anything that is served around the world but some of the most memorable were probably sea urchins served fresh in the shell, picking them out of the shell with chopsticks was an experience, kind of like trying to pick up animated spaghetti. Drunken shrimp where they are served in a liquor bath, they drown in the alcohol and are cooked at table side. I remember at one dinner in Singapore when the young lady seated next to me asked if my rice had "eyes" too, on closer inspection it turns out the rice was peppered with newly hatched fish fry, eyes and all. And dog on a stick in Korea at 3 am from a street vendor (maybe alcohol was involved....). Horse is pretty good, a little known fact about Friesian horses is that the biggest market for them, until us crazy americans discovered them with the movie Ladyhawk, was as table fare.

Have had good bear and very bad bear. Ate way too much venison early on so now don't really care for it, would rather a good cut of beef. Wife loves lamb, have to leave the house when she cooks it but will eat it under duress. Seems most gator I've eaten was over cooked and tough. Draw the line at possum and coon, but most other wild game or seafood is open for tasting. Love raw oysters and clams, cooking them just ruins them. Mountain oysters on the other hand need to be cooked and are quite good. Have had rat, tasted just like squirrel, but tougher, not something I'll try again. Various snakes, the bigger the better as table fare. Being in an industry that kept me in foreign countries definitely expanded my palette. And owl does taste just like chicken. Got lots of kin in WV, dinners were always an adventure.

Joe
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Offline sandhills

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #61 on: September 26, 2017, 01:38:26 PM »
Other than I'd definitely pass on the rat, coons, opossum, I'd pretty much try anything else you mentioned if only once  :).  I go to mountain oyster feeds every once in awhile (yes we have those around here), even though I might be the one to "deliver" the meat for them, when cooked right they're good, snake is one I'd like to try, around here it'd be rattlesnake from West of us. I think it boils down to (no pun intended) what our ancestors had to do to survive, hard times call for hard measures, old saying.  I'd still would prefer a nice T-bone though  :D.

Offline WDH

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #62 on: September 26, 2017, 08:15:49 PM »
The rattlesnakes around here are musky smelling.  You can smell the musk when you bring the fork to your mouth.  I have ate my last one.  Life is short. 
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Offline Weekend_Sawyer

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #63 on: September 27, 2017, 08:07:47 AM »
 I lived in Beijing China back in the mid 80's.
We had a lot of "Mystery Meat" meals.

The 2 things I had that I don't care if I ever have again are
sea cucumber, which is some type of large worm that lives in the ocean
and tripe, didn't like the smell, didn't like the taste.

I was raised on venison and still love it. Venison has to be handled correctly from shot to table.

Love elk, moose, buffalo. Haven't had nearly enough of these.

We ate a racoon once. It wasn't bad but I don't need it.

We eat rattle snake at least once a year. Our rattlers in WV are quite tasty.

Wild turkey is another favorite of mine. I'll take it over store bought any day.
Again has to be handled properly from shot to table.

Jon
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Offline starmac

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2018, 11:56:42 PM »
Have eat a lot of wild game, drew the line on possum and nutria rats, I won't even skin them so they would be hard to eat. Mountain oysters are good eating, so are fried regular oysters. I tried a raw oyster once, actually probably about 15 times, but it finally got back up far enough I could spit it out. So far I have not had lamp I liked, but do like goat if handled right, and mountain sheep (dall) is some of the best eating there is. Had coon, not terrible, but wouldn't want a steady diet of it. never been around any cat, but everyone claims linx is good groceries, so will try it if I get the chance.
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #65 on: January 24, 2018, 11:50:23 AM »
That part about the oyster gave me a good laugh.  Banjo
Cooks AC 36--Prentice 210C--Morgan edger--Kubota M7040 with loader--Case 580 K with extendahoe--Case 850C dozer--Int 1700 series twin cylinder dump/log/flatbed truck--logging arch--2 Logrite mill sp.--Cat claw sharpening system--And a bulldog to make sure it all stays here.

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #66 on: January 24, 2018, 06:38:26 PM »
Yeah weekend, venison is king in my house
Managed to put 3 in the freezer this yr, all anterless.
Cant ever understand the term "gamey"
If processed and prepared properly. all game meat is delicious.
My favorites are in descending order,
Whitetail, Moose Muley, Elk, caribou and antelope.
Maybe because whitetail is what we mostly consume and I have gotten the price down to about 129.95 bucks per pound now.
The other s are much more expensive.
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Offline coxy

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #67 on: January 24, 2018, 07:31:14 PM »
if only 129.95 a pound you must live in the poor part of NY  ;D :D cause I pay a lot more than that  :)

Offline starmac

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #68 on: January 24, 2018, 07:45:50 PM »
It all depends on how creative you get with the accounting. maybe if I told the wife I just had 129.95 a pound in it, it would make her happy.
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Offline charles mann

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #69 on: January 16, 2019, 09:13:11 PM »
i grew up poor, mostly bc my dad used all our money to pay for the 20ac of land we lived on, which was an investment. so we lived off the land, hogs, coon, tree rat, nutria rat, beaver, possum, rabbit, deer, quail, duck and frogs. if it slithered, it was off limits. during my military yrs, my trip to korea allowed me to try cat, or at least that is what the restaurant said it was, and of course dog. you just picked the puppy out, they cut it up, fried it, then stirred it in with rice or noodles, some kind of "pray for ice cream" peppers, which after the first bite, couldn't taste the food. after the first bowl of dog, when we went back on payday (2x a month), i ordered my dog, but with NO peppers. here recently, iv tried elk, and it was ok, but not like deer. iv heard mnt lion is good, hopefully will be able to take a lion hunt in id 1 yr, and I'm not a fan of killing if I'm not going to eat it, so ill definitely try lion. 

iv also tried gator, and LOVE me some mud bugs, but will NEVER eat an oyster. iv eaten what was called palm cabbage, was told it was the heart/bulb of a small palm tree, that grew below the ground. mixed in with blue crabs out of the brackish creek running through the property, fresh scallops, shrimp, taters, onions and corn. 
i have gotten to where i can't even eat pork out of the market stores anymore. to many yrs of eating feral hogs, or pen raised, grain fed feral hogs has made domestic pork nasty and gut churning. 
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #70 on: January 16, 2019, 10:23:55 PM »
   We grew up eating swamp cabbage in central Fla along the Suwannee River area. I assume that is what you are talking about. What we had was heart of sable palm. The perfect size to cut was about waist high although the heart was the same in one that size or one 100' tall. You peeled away the tough, woody outer areas till you got to the tender white heart then cut the bottom tender part off then when it got tough you peeled off a few layers like an artichoke and started again. Dad said it was best to use a dull knife to avoid getting the tough part. The tough part was bitter from quinine which I am told was why the Seminole Indians did not get malaria because it was part of their staple diet. My grandma liked a little bitter in hers but would add a table spoon of sugar or so to offset that bitter taste. I grew to like it especially fried in a little bacon grease. We built the US embassy in Haitii and I was there in 2006 and Swamp cabbage was sold in the bigger markets there. My number two, a local lady, was very familiar with and said she liked them too.

 Earlier some one mentioned Sea urchin. I was invited to a Harvest Moon Festival about October 1986 in the village of Henoko Okinawa when I was stationed next door at Camp Schwab. They had a wide selection of sea food dishes. The best IMHO was a fish wrapped in a banana leaf and stuffed with a rice and sea urchin mixture. They had some raw sea urchin people ate with chop sticks but I noticed the big 7-8 liter bottles on Saki on the table were nearly empty before anyone ate them. I don't drink so I never tried that treat.
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Offline charles mann

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #71 on: January 16, 2019, 11:21:03 PM »
  We grew up eating swamp cabbage in central Fla along the Suwannee River area. I assume that is what you are talking about. What we had was heart of sable palm. The perfect size to cut was about waist high although the heart was the same in one that size or one 100' tall. You peeled away the tough, woody outer areas till you got to the tender white heart then cut the bottom tender part off then when it got tough you peeled off a few layers like an artichoke and started again. Dad said it was best to use a dull knife to avoid getting the tough part. The tough part was bitter from quinine which I am told was why the Seminole Indians did not get malaria because it was part of their staple diet. My grandma liked a little bitter in hers but would add a table spoon of sugar or so to offset that bitter taste. I grew to like it especially fried in a little bacon grease. We built the US embassy in Haitii and I was there in 2006 and Swamp cabbage was sold in the bigger markets there. My number two, a local lady, was very familiar with and said she liked them too.

yes, swamp cabbage, palm cabbage. the few times i helped harvest it, i remember the heart above ground was a bit harder, even after boiling, but the below ground was like mash taters. it was all good, and i don't remember it being bitter, but who knows. I'm about 40 lbs over weight, and i didn't get this fine figure from being picky at the feed trough.  ;D
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #72 on: January 17, 2019, 08:33:55 AM »
Charles,

   I'd bet if you ate more swamp cabbage you'd shed some of that excess girth. Because it is all fiber it is just about the world's best natural laxative. :D
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline charles mann

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #73 on: January 17, 2019, 11:50:15 AM »
Charles,

   I'd bet if you ate more swamp cabbage you'd shed some of that excess girth. Because it is all fiber it is just about the world's best natural laxative. :D
They dont have those here in central tx. 
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Offline WDH

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #74 on: January 17, 2019, 12:31:09 PM »
This child won’t be eating any puppy with noodles :)  
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Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #75 on: January 17, 2019, 03:55:56 PM »
This child won’t be eating any puppy with noodles :)  
Not bad with Tabasco.
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #76 on: January 17, 2019, 04:50:45 PM »
Danny,

   You better go check on your beagle! This could get ugly. Sampson may have to start sleeping in the house. I sure wish I had completed his house-training now.
Howard Green
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Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Texas Ranger

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #77 on: January 17, 2019, 05:07:55 PM »
Charles,

   I'd bet if you ate more swamp cabbage you'd shed some of that excess girth. Because it is all fiber it is just about the world's best natural laxative. :D
They dont have those here in central tx.
but we have grits
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Offline rjwoelk

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #78 on: January 17, 2019, 06:33:15 PM »
Gives a all new meaning of walk the dog. ???
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Offline charles mann

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Re: Coon, possum, horse?
« Reply #79 on: January 17, 2019, 07:04:36 PM »
This child won’t be eating any puppy with noodles :)  
Not bad with Tabasco.
even w/o tabasco, it is UMMMMM UMMMMM GOOD. 
Danny,

   You better go check on your beagle! This could get ugly. Sampson may have to start sleeping in the house. I sure wish I had completed his house-training now.


I'm sure they are edible, but for the most part, in korea, it was certain breed of dog, raised specifically for eating. just like beef. as where all types of beef can be eaten, some are better than others, some are more chewy than others. its the same for dog. 
on the weekends after night of drinking in the ville, strolling through the gate, seconds before curfew with a coke in hand and 4 egg samiches in the other. the next morning, i would be woken up to puppies bawling in pain, from being whooped. i was told by a local girl, that is how they tenderize the meat just before slaughter, they beat the dogs, bruising the meat, making them more tender, especially for the toothless elderly.
Charles,

   I'd bet if you ate more swamp cabbage you'd shed some of that excess girth. Because it is all fiber it is just about the world's best natural laxative. :D
They dont have those here in central tx.
but we have grits
that we do, and boy does it make a turd. i guess if it was legal in the US to eat dog, I'm betting dog and egg samich with a side of grits would make fine breakfast.

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