The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

Draw for handbuilt acoustic guitar get your name in


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat



Author Topic: Making charcoal  (Read 4949 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #60 on: January 17, 2018, 09:15:50 PM »
Burger time  ;D

If you look back at the big barrel burn I was doing I was dropping a lid on top and then a few scoops of dirt packed on top of the lid to exclude air. Then I look for smoke and if any shows I pack that area better. That amount was taking a couple of days to cool off.

Mike, tell me more about activated charcoal. I'm thinking it is just "hot" charcoal, clean, everything but the carbon has been burned out.

Offline mike_belben

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2546
  • Location: Middle TN
  • Pulp Friction
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #61 on: January 18, 2018, 08:31:33 AM »
Naw, i checked wikipedia and its a bit more involved.  Either steam or chemical process.  Its expensive to buy and has a million uses.
Revelation 3:20

Offline JohnW

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 266
  • Location: Southern Indiana
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #62 on: January 18, 2018, 05:32:54 PM »
Don. I've made charcoal, probably about 20 times, with various direct burn setups.  I smothered the fire out most of the time, but I like extinguishing with water better.  It puts the fire out faster, saves more charcoal and bigger pieces.

However you do it, sifting out the ashes and fines is important for blacksmith type use.

Offline bdsmith

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Location: Gulf Coast MS, inland 40 miles
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #63 on: January 23, 2018, 10:54:09 AM »
TKehl,
Using snow to remove heat!  That a new one for me - I live in south Mississippi.

While we just had 1" a few days ago, it has been 25 years sine the previous snow fall.

Offline TKehl

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1061
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Sedalia, MO
  • Gender: Male
  • Certified Contrarian
    • Share Post
    • Kehlhof Ranch
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #64 on: January 25, 2018, 09:50:40 AM »
We don't get snow all that often compared to further North.  An inch or two a few times a winter and it may stick around for a week maybe two.  There are exceptions to that though...

As such, if I do more, I think I will set the bucket on a couple concrete blocks inside a plastic tub of water/ice.  The tubs that the cattle protein licks come in look just right.   ;)
Lucas 6-13+slabber, Mr. Sawmill bandmill, orange chainsaws, JD SSL, Case Backhoe, farm tractors, trailers, and 150ish acres of trees.  Fledgling woodshop with CNC router, laser engraver, Woodmaster 712, and a Berlin 108 moulder (project).  Oh, and a lovely (patient) wife and four offbearers.

Offline r.man

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2238
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Wilberforce Ontario Canada
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #65 on: January 29, 2018, 10:58:54 AM »
My cooling pail is a steel pail with a steel lid that used to have a retractable plastic pour spout. I fill it with hot coals, pop on the lid and then drop a brick over the big pour hole. If you want the charcoal for biochar quenching works well, if for fuel choking is better. Last year I was dumping directly into a steel barrel with a steel lid but decided I was converting some char into ash, too much air available in the barrel. Banking the fire was burying live coal in a thick layer of ash to avoid having to relight and it works good but not in a pail out in the cold. I can cap the pail with ash only and in 8 hrs everything in it will be cold. Too much heat loss through the sides and not enough volume to protect the core area. Hope this helps.
Life is too short or my list is too long, not sure which. Dec 2014

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #66 on: February 03, 2018, 06:35:23 PM »
 I played around with the little gasifying stove from the driveonwood site today, pretty neat. Even with it cold and windy it was smoke free and a little fistful of wood lasted about 30 minutes and produced good heat



 

 

 

 

 

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #67 on: February 06, 2018, 07:37:15 AM »
I've been slowly gathering parts for a simple fire and ruminating, let me run this by you guys. A lot of effort goes into sealing the top to keep oxygen out of the top of the container. I'm going to try it with an old water pressure tank. What if I just put the output pipe fitting up top and my charge/cleanout port is on a plate at the bottom that has the inlet nozzle in it. A small air leak there simply feeds the fire. I'll have to invert it to charge but not a big deal on a small tank. Thoughts?

Offline bdsmith

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Location: Gulf Coast MS, inland 40 miles
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #68 on: February 06, 2018, 08:00:15 PM »
How will you light the charge after you invert the tank?
The proper positioning of the fuel in relation to air will enable pyrolysis, i.e. a combustion moving through the fuel towards air, leaving behind charcoal. 
With an air vent at the bottom, you need to light top of the charge. Wood gas will escape out the top.
With an air vent at the top, you need to light the bottom and have the wood gas leave through the bottom port. Since the hot gasses will rise, this method might not work well.

Most people find that with a Top Lit, Up Draft stove (TLUD), they often build it with too little air flow to keep the fire burning.  What they don't realize is that more air doesn't mean less charcoal, it just means faster burning.
Of course, stopping the combustion at the right time is key otherwise you end up with a pile of ash instead of charcoal.

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2018, 08:32:17 PM »
Whoops sorry, I'm jumping around. My wife says I start conversations in the middle  :D
check out this video on the simple fire charcoal gasifier, that's what I'm gathering parts for;

It is similar to what justallen and puffergas have done.

Online LeeB

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7479
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Yellville Arkansas
  • Gender: Male
  • proud to be a TEXAN in Arkansas
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #70 on: February 11, 2018, 09:22:57 PM »
How long would that engine run on 5 gal. of charcoal?
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #71 on: February 11, 2018, 10:50:48 PM »
I've watched several of his videos, including one where he is running a Ranger on charcoal. My memory might be off but I think he was getting about 20 minutes on that setup. A taller container is the trick from what he discovered. I've taken an old water pressure tank and started fabbing one today. I had never opened one up until now, they are kind of interesting. First lesson was bleed the air off before drilling a hole in one  ::). I cut a "door" in the lower section that I'm going to try to load through. I took a piece of 1/8" steel plate and used the radial arm turned sideways to make a concave mold to hammer the plate into a curve that fit over the opening. Then drilled a 1-1/4" hole in that and inserted the nozzle through that removable plate. Inside the tank there is a rubber bladder in the lower third held in by a ring that is press fit at the lower weld. I got a screwdriver in under that, bent it in and then cut it. Cut around the bladder at the bottom inlet and pulled that out. At the weld at the 2/3 height there is a steel domed baffle with a 1" hole in it dividing the upper third from the rest of the container. That might be able to be used as a cooling/storage chamber but I wasn't sure if that was safe and wanted more run time so I cut it out. I think I have more like 15 gallons worth of tank at this point. Out of the top I cut a hole for the 1" outlet pipe and mounted a flange up there. From that I think I'll elbow over and then down into a 2" pipe full of steel wool as a filter/cooler. I'm more paranoid about heat and fire than he is but he's been running on plastic hose and foam filters fine.

Offline gww

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1208
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #72 on: February 12, 2018, 10:30:18 AM »
I do not know about charcoal but read that on the wood gassifiers that 20 lbs of dry wood added up to 1 gal of gassoline.
Cheers
gww

Offline justallan1

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1766
  • Age: 53
  • Location: Southeast Montana
  • Gender: Male
  • living and learning
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #73 on: February 13, 2018, 09:52:56 AM »
What I did was found an old grease drum that I'm guessing is 20 gallons and had a lid and cleaned it out. (Luckily it had a plastic bag for the grease)
At about 3" from the bottom I cut a hole for the air inlet. I took a plate of thin steel and cut a hole big enough to weld a 1" threaded coupler, with using a couple you can change your fitting inside for where you want the fire and it gives you something on the outside to plumb in any your exhaust feed from your engine if you decide to do that at some point. I then used 8 bolts around that plate bolting it to the drum, using plenty of red RTV. NOTE, put the bolts with the threads facing out so they don't get filled with crap if you ever have to take it apart.
The top of my drum had a lid and a lip for the lid which helped me tremendously. I got lucky and found a cooking pot that fit perfectly. I bought a chunk of stove sealing rope and put it around the lip on the drum and put the cooking pot on that. THAT HAS TO BE AN AIRTIGHT SEAL.
I probably ran the thing for 20 minutes or better and around the base of the gasifier is was slightly warm, but the rest was plenty cool. I used some real old cheap plastic vacuum hose and it didn't hurt it a bit.
The two biggest things that I found that will ruin your chances of success are air leaks and the sizing of your charcoal. Keep in mind that your fire can only get as big as the air will let it get.
Something else to remember is to be able to shut air off, from both directions, BEFORE you light it the first time. If it starts getting hot you want to be able to shut it down and if it still gets any air it will sit there and smolder any charcoal left inside.
I hope this helps a little as I'm basically brand new to this also.

 

 

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #74 on: February 18, 2018, 09:18:06 AM »
I got the gasifier assembled yesterday and did a trial run. If you look at Allan's above I had the simple fire charcoal reactor made from a well pressure tank. Out of the top I put a section of aluminum vacuum cleaner pipe then plastic vac hose to an old oil burner induction fan. Output from the fan went to a pipe with an elbow, no filter at this point. It fired up and ran well producing a good quantity of grayish white charcoal smelling smoke. I ran it for a half hour or so and it got warm but never hot which sounds correct. I tried to light the smoke with a propane torch and could not. The torch would clean up the smoke immediately but it wouldn't actually light. I tried removing the fan and hoses just leaving the aluminum pipe in, and on natural draft it would still "run" quite well still making good smoke but still would not light. Am I doing something wrong or is this normal?

Offline Paul_H

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 6626
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Enderby,BC
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #75 on: February 18, 2018, 12:05:15 PM »
If the fan is too powerful it could blow out any flame you try to light. It only takes a minute or two to get good gas from a charcoal gasifier,it should run an engine after a couple minutes. Place a lighted paper on the ground and direct the gas toward it and see if you can see flame although a good gas flame is hard to see in daylight but you should see heat waves,
eg  tregar  meste  p  Tulla, for  ho  var  krulla  i  ulla.

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4668
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Making charcoal
« Reply #76 on: February 18, 2018, 06:14:27 PM »
Got a flare  8)
 

 

This is the reactor at this point, I just had the can sitting on top to light the flare. I'd say do not copy this design, I'll keep playing with it. It's a pain not to have a top load.
 

 

I think the problem was damp charcoal. That's sacks of it stacked all around there under the barn shed roof, we've had a solid month of rain and damp. I topped off the reactor today. It hadn't burned much yesterday. The smoke was much cleaner looking so I think the majority of what was in there, the old stuff from yesterday was a good bit drier. It is still a damp smoke coming out the top but I think it was dry enough to light today. I ran the fan for a good bit longer and got the reactor too hot to touch much of it then the flare fired up on natural draft. I think, and that is all, I think, the lesson learned is to store simplefire charcoal in a drum with a lid.

Time to start playing with the old Wheel Horse  ;D


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

moved
MOVED: Making charcoal

Started by Paul_H on General Board

0 Replies
237 Views
Last post January 02, 2018, 02:57:40 PM
by Paul_H
xx
Charcoal

Started by jon12345 on General Board

67 Replies
17654 Views
Last post March 09, 2008, 10:17:18 AM
by johnjbc
xx
charcoal anyone?

Started by west penn on Sawmills and Milling

20 Replies
5154 Views
Last post January 04, 2011, 12:23:50 PM
by MP_Wall
xx
DIY Charcoal

Started by metalspinner on General Board

80 Replies
14570 Views
Last post October 28, 2012, 11:40:48 PM
by Weekend_Sawyer
 


Powered by EzPortal