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Author Topic: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak  (Read 7240 times)

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Offline John Mc

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Re: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak
« Reply #60 on: September 18, 2018, 10:38:03 AM »
I did an experiment just like this some years ago. I was trying to find out how much difference it makes stacking wood in a single row exposed to sun and wind, in a triple row with 3 rows stacked right next to each other - also exposed to sun and wind, or under firewood shed (open on three sides, multiple rows stacked about 6" apart). Other than the roof on the shed, everything else was uncovered. The shed has a gravel floor, the rest were laid on poles to keep it up off the ground. Species were Beech, Red Maple, some Sugar Maple, Oak (red & white) and Black Birch.

I wish I had kept the data, but it has been lost over time. I do recall the general results:

For most of the species I tracked, I could easily get below 20% (most was in the 15% range) with one summer of drying if stacked in single rows. I could even wait until June or July to cut split and stack and still be ready to burn by late fall. The exception was Oak, which was higher MC and hard to light that fall. It really needs to season 2 summers (at least in my drying conditions here in VT).

In the triple rows, it was hit or miss if I could get it dry in one summer, but most of the non-oak wood in the outside rows was in decent shape.

The slowest drying was in my shed, even though it was open on three sides. Some of the stuff that was fresh-cut green developed mold. It did eventually dry, but other than the outer row, nothing cut that spring was as dry as I like it in order to use that fall. No problems with rot, however.

I'll be interested to see what you come up with, Dr b
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 32vld

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Re: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak
« Reply #61 on: October 24, 2018, 08:44:47 AM »
It makes me wonder when people say two to three years to
season oak just how long do they let the rounds sit before
they split them and to what size do they split the firewood 
pieces.

My son has a pizza truck with a wood fired oven. He has
been running his truck for four years.

We use only oak. Started burning mostly red, now we use almost
all white. Firewood is 16" to 17" length. Most of the wood is split
to about a 2" x 3" cross section.

I have a 6.5' x 15' trailer to get the wood. So a trailer load of
rounds will be split in 2 to 4 weeks.

The wood is stacked 4' high by 24' long in a shady but open
area, uncovered. Rows are 3' apart to easily run a wheel barrow
through them.

Moisture meter reading of 14% on the ends and 21% when 
the wood is re-split to check the middle moisture content after
one year of drying.


Offline John Mc

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Re: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak
« Reply #62 on: October 24, 2018, 10:33:36 AM »
I need two summers of drying to reliably get Red Oak down to below 20% average MC. Cut to 16", split to roughly 3"x3" or 3" x 4", and stack in the spring, single rows (i.e. at least several feet between them) open to the sun and wind, uncovered until just before heating season. Most species will be ready to burn (+/- 15% MC) by that fall.

Not Oak. It's not ready until the following heating season. Can I get it to burn after just that one summer? Sure. But it's harder to get started, burns less cleanly, and does not give off as much heat as if I let it fully dry.

I suspect if I got an early enough start in the late summer or fall, I might by able to get it there in only slightly over a year, but I've never done much testing of that.

I'm guessing the difference may be either the time of year that the Oak is cut, or the fact that your drying season is probably a bit longer on Long Island than in my part of VT.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 32vld

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Re: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak
« Reply #63 on: October 25, 2018, 07:17:04 AM »
I have split all my oak with a splitting axe. So I never would have
enough firewood put up to season to more than 1 year ahead.

This September I finally bought a log splitter and have a source
for white oak so I hope to be able to try seasoning the oak for
a longer time so my son and I can see what difference there is
burning in his wood fired oven.

Also he is looking to open a store in addition to his truck so I will
need to have enough wood on hand to supply him.

Another thing is I am thinking of using a hoop shed with a canvas
over the top because his wood has to be clean for the fire is on 
the floor of the oven to keep dirt off the pizza.

Now the lower rows of wood get splashed with dirt from the rain.
Slows up the loading time cleaning the wood. And the bottom two
rows are so dirty that the have to be restacked like a log cabin
out in the open so the rain washes all the dirt off of them before 
they can be used.

I wood leave the ends of the hoop shed open and the sides have
a opening about 2' between the canvas and the ground.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Firewood seasonoing. Red oak
« Reply #64 on: October 25, 2018, 09:19:10 AM »
32vld,I doubt many of us is splitting down to 2-3 inches for firewood. Yours should dry quicker than a stove wood size of wood,which I think would be at least 6 inches across.
Good idea on the hoop house.
I wonder,room wise,if you could dry it like lumber. Lay down 2 pieces,like stickers,than a layer of wood than stickers and so on. That would give you more airflow,I would think.
More thinking,would that black weed control allow airflow but help keep the rain off the ends?
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79


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