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Author Topic: Anvils  (Read 13129 times)

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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #60 on: November 24, 2012, 10:15:33 AM »
 Nice links, MM!  :)  :P
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Operating a 2020 Woodmizer LT35 hydraulic for Wagner Farms, Dacusville, SC

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #61 on: November 24, 2012, 01:57:26 PM »
There was a zillion types of forming tools you could use in both the prichel and the hardy hole depending on what you were trying to do .I know some of them not all of them .

Offline Magicman

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #62 on: November 24, 2012, 04:45:05 PM »
  Magicman,we need a picture!!! 

OK, here are a couple of pictures of mine.  There are so many questions that I wish I could ask my Granddad.
 

 
I did not even realize that it was marked until I got the wire brush.
 

 
A closeup showing the markings. 
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Offline Radar67

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #63 on: November 26, 2012, 10:30:13 AM »
Magic, it looks like your top and edges are still in good shape to be that old. Those are hard to find.

As I understand, the step was used for getting a good, sharp shoulder on the metal when you needed it. The step edges tended to stay in better shape than the main surface.
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #64 on: November 26, 2012, 10:46:10 AM »
In this conversation discussing anviloligy on the long side it really doesn't make a diff what kind or who made it as long as it's functional .

Now maybe if this were 1883 and you were hand forging shoes for a race horse or 2010 pounding out parts for the space shuttle it would .I doubt  seriously though if that would apply to very many especially the shuttle part .

Offline Rooster

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2012, 10:37:17 PM »
So, all this talk about anvils has lighted a fire under me to get my homemade forge built.  Its been talked about amongst the guys in the family,... how we would all like to dabble in some forge workaka pounding hot iron.  I know that my son and I will definitely use it for projects and some artwork. 
The first thing I did was ask my Dad if he would like to share the anvil that he got from one of his neighbors.  I believe it is a 139# Peter Wright.  I tried cleaning it up a bit, and this is what we ended up with.

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"We talk about creating millions of "shovel ready" jobs, for a society that doesn't really encourage anybody to pick up a shovel." 
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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #66 on: November 26, 2012, 11:08:24 PM »
Any of you trying to decipher the writing on the anvils, you might try doing a crayon or pencil rubbing, with a piece of paper.
No matter how conventional wisdom may fly in the face of radical thought, it's still the most popular type.

Operating a 2020 Woodmizer LT35 hydraulic for Wagner Farms, Dacusville, SC

Offline Magicman

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #67 on: November 27, 2012, 09:02:46 AM »
Wow Rooster, yours looks new.

I'm glad that Radar stirred the anvil pot because I had no idea that anvils had a history.....and a future.   :)
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Offline Radar67

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #68 on: November 27, 2012, 09:23:31 AM »
Looks like I may have to get you over one day to work on a forge Lynn. I just need to get my tractor barn finished to have a dry place to put it.
"A man's time is the most valuable gift he can give another." TOM

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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #69 on: November 27, 2012, 09:41:05 AM »
Forge ! My dad made one from the front brake drum of an old farm truck stuck in the middle of an  old BBQ grill surrounded by dry sand .Worked like a charm .

The old boy would build a coal fire and banked the coals to burn off to coke which took a couple hours .Open it up and used an old Kirby vaccuum for the air and could heat steel like you wouldn't believe .Had a grand total of nothing in it .

That old forge is where I learned how to forge weld as a teenager maybe 50 years ago more or less .

Offline Magicman

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #70 on: November 27, 2012, 10:23:39 AM »
I also melted some of my Granddad's tools in his forge.  He was not happy.   :-\
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #71 on: November 27, 2012, 12:14:05 PM »
Yeah you have to watch where you put it in the fire for sure .Leave it in the air blast  too long it'will go from cherry to white pretty quickly,actually amazingly fast .

I forgot what the actual fire temp is ,over 3000 though which is not as hot as actelene but you've got more fire surface so it heats up a lot faster .

To weld you have to push it to white which is around 2000-2100 and most steel melts right above that say 2200 . Heat er-up toss some white sand on it and  hammer like a wild man .The hammer blows drives around another 400 degrees to it .If it's blowing sparks with the hammer it's welding .Don't dilly dally around either because the steel will only hold the heat  so long .If it's cooling stick it back in the fire .

Offline Ironwood

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #72 on: November 27, 2012, 07:27:45 PM »
Great thread guys, good job on finding history of your prized possessions. Nice cleanup job Rooster. I too have a thing for smithing.

For those who do not know I have the largest supply of true wrought iron in North America, we supply Colonial Williamsburg and Mount Vernon and many, many highend smith around the country. The only other volume supplier is in Yorkshire England "repuddling" old iron they find.

 Currently good anvils are over $2 a pound and pushing $3 for really clean, rare ones. I recently picked up a 550 pound Peter Wright, I had been staring at it for years at my local metal suppliers shop where it was used as a paint skid....finally proposed a VERY generous barter for some furniture.....didnt know it was a PW until I brought it home to clean off the paint.  :o PW where THE cat's meow and standard for most all folks, farmer to farrier. and industry. 

 Many old ones ARE wrought bodies. If you want a "quiet" anvil look for a Fisher, they are the ones with the eagle on the side of the body. They are cast, and much, much quieter. The guy in NJ is Josh, he bought all the rights to the Fisher line and has/will be opening a museum with a TON of cool historic stuff. I have found some good stuff for him to fill the "gaps" in his Fisher collection. He (I believe) has a 1500 lb Fisher.  :o

 There are LOTS of good groups around the country that help continue the fine smithing traditions, some with ties to ABANA (Artists BLacksmith of North America) and/or other organizations affiliations. We are very fortunate to have PAABA (Piitsburgh Area Artists Blacksmiths) and they support a very active local tractor club (about 20 minutes away from me) that has a 3200 sq ft dirt floored shop that hosts "open forging" Thursday nights for members throughout the warmer months, last time I was there, there were 5 women, five men, and about 6 kids working hot iron off four/five coal forges and manual blowers (some of the old timers sit and run the blowers ALL night). Total people there was 25-30. Very nice. I try to support them as best I can from all my "stuff" here ::) I have NEVER seen a more open and welcoming group of guys as the Smithing community throughout New England and the Mid-West I would assume it is true throughout the country as it seems it is the "norm". Many many guys are fanatics about this stuff and have dozens and dozens of smithing artifacts "stacked" up in corners of their shops/spaces.

 


 Ironwood
 

 Ps, this is a local guys partial collection that fills an entire 3 story house. Many of the stake anvils are Mouse Hole as I recall. He has  "parts" of anvils from Roman times, and other that are nearly centuries old, including those for armor. He has travelled around the world collecting. All of the collectables were well marked with country of origin and dates, very well researched. IT was truely amazing.......He hosted a PAABA meeting/luncheon last year.
 

  

  

 
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Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #73 on: November 27, 2012, 08:45:13 PM »
That's awesome, Ironwood.  :)
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Offline Bill Gaiche

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2012, 09:04:49 PM »
Great stories. When I was at the Wilson County Fair in Lebanon Tenn. they had a building where they done forging. Had several stations where people worked at doing metal works. bg

Offline park ranger

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #75 on: November 29, 2012, 12:14:04 AM »
I have a Peter Wright that had rounded over edges so I ground them down clean and built them up with hard surfacing rod (for dozer blades). Then reground the edges. The edge has been there for around 15 years and withstood both my kids and me.  Remember there is a small length of the top that should be rounded over with like a 1/2" radius. 

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #76 on: November 29, 2012, 07:53:30 AM »
I noticed Ironwoods avatar lists Pittsburg Pa .If there was ever a steel city that's it .

My father grew up in the Penn Hills /Universal area as a teenager .I remember driving passed the huge mills and the glow of the big furnaces as a teenager while visiting for a family reunion .Sadly with the way the US steel industry has circled the drain I'd well imagine they are all gone now .

To build a huge steel mill you need three things ,fuel ,ore and transportation .Pittsburgh had all three . Cleveland had one ,Lake Erie .

Then you have the Ohio river with a steel town about every 50 miles at one time ,gone .When they let the steel industry in this country slip abroad is when we got in the shape we are in right now .On that I think it's best for me to just end because the more I think about it the madder I get .

Offline Okrafarmer

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #77 on: November 29, 2012, 11:53:58 PM »
I know what you mean, Al.  >:(
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Offline Ironwood

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #78 on: November 30, 2012, 12:05:03 AM »
We do have a few specialty mills around. I have been present for a few liquidations of old mills (several in the Allegheny Valley) I have hauled ALOT of pattern shops home in my day......

 I have some cool artifacts here from various mills, some shop made tools, etc..... American Bridge (AmBridge Pa, Youngstown Sheet Tube, some coke plant stuff from Struthers, Ohio Carbon Limstone (my grandfather was a night watchman), Edgewater Steel Oakmont Pa., US Stel Clairton, and probably many others......Signs tools, tongs, etc.....

 My Father was an open hearth area crane operator, Youngstown Sheet Tube, the Center Street Bridge in Struthers Ohio went right over the rolling mill area my Dad worked, cool stuff watching that red hot iron flying out of the rollers onto the deck, one of my earliest memories (the SMELL! Sulfur like). We would sometimes go pick him up on the other side of that bridge when the whistle blew several thousand men came rolling out that gate. What a sight......

 I have a replica of a French-Indian War anvil here. I friend who was a historian/buff, found part of one buried locally on a farm where some of the fighting occured (really all thru "Westylvania") He had a master made a cast 6 of them from high quality alloy. I got the last one he had, he died suddenly not long after retiring from his history position at our local highschool. Man was he INTO smithing. I will get a pic of it tomorrow.


 Here are some more pics of my other friend's collection of anvils.... He drags the   from all over the world....


  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Anvils
« Reply #79 on: November 30, 2012, 07:16:58 AM »
I've only worked in one mill but twice .Every summer Empire -Detroit aka Reeves in Mansfield Ohio had a maintainace shut down .Two weeks of 7-12's .Make a bunch of money in a short period of time .

The vastness of a steel mill is hard to imagine unless you've been behind the gates . This was in the days they still ran the 200 ton open hearths . In July the heat was almost unbearable and those open hearths had been shut down a week ten days before we ever got there .Aside from that it was interesting .


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