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Author Topic: sawing guitar parts  (Read 1357 times)

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Offline 69bronco

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2021, 06:21:50 AM »
Super video! Thanks for posting!

Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2021, 08:05:39 AM »
Thing is, I want to build using woods that grow on my farm.  Spruce doesn't grow here.  We have bur oak, ash, hackberry, walnut, mulberry, osage orange,elm, juniper, cottonwood.  Probably a few trees I don't recall right now. Tempted to put a walnut face on it.  Saw a really cool oak faced guitar someone was playing on tv one time, had the grain angled like a V shape, and had amazing rays on the front.
Most everything I enjoy doing turns out to be work

Offline doc henderson

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2021, 08:46:47 AM »
I think Catalpa would make a great sound board, but what do I know.  do you have that near you?  it was planted here in groves for the next species to make railroad ties.
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2021, 08:51:31 AM »
Thing is, I want to build using woods that grow on my farm.  Spruce doesn't grow here.  We have bur oak, ash, hackberry, walnut, mulberry, osage orange,elm, juniper, cottonwood.  Probably a few trees I don't recall right now. Tempted to put a walnut face on it.  Saw a really cool oak faced guitar someone was playing on tv one time, had the grain angled like a V shape, and had amazing rays on the front.
Yes, you were clear on this in your OP. Might I suggest doing a google search for 'tonewoods' where you should be able to find a lot of information about which woods are good for what things in a musical instrument. Then do some searches for your woods to get examples or more detailed info such as 'Maple Tonewood'. Watch out for alias's and nicknames. Swamp ash is in great demand by Luthiers all over, but there is a variety of meanings and interpretations to this name. It is not a particular species, per se. It is more of a growth condition.
 My banjo is made from maple, but if it could have afforded it at the time I would have gotten walnut because of the lower tonal qualities. Most folks don't realize it but the necks are a resonant part of the instrument, there is a lot of black magic that goes into getting 'the right sound'. I have a friend who is likely the best known banjo player in the world and he has quite a collection. Every banjo he gets to play gets the stock tuners removed and 4 Keith tuners installed, not because he needs to use those tuners on every banjo, but because he says the extra weight from those tuners on the peg head gives a much more desirable tonal quality from the neck. At $520-$630 per banjo (stainless vs. gold) he must be pretty sure of this. Best of luck, I can't wait to see you get started.
 OH and as mentioned above, StewMac is a great source for parts, tools, fretwire, etc.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
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Online Nebraska

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #24 on: June 22, 2021, 10:41:33 AM »
As I read through this thread I realized just how infinite the number of off tunnels there are down this rabbit hole.  Interesting  thread. :)

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2021, 10:53:49 AM »
As I read through this thread I realized just how infinite the number of off tunnels there are down this rabbit hole.  Interesting  thread. :)
Indeed! I once sat through a breakfast panel discussion at a Luthier's show and listened to about 8 world class luthiers 'discuss' (sometimes argue) what the proper glues were to use in certain instrument applications, how they were prepared, mixed, heated, cooked, applied, clamped, and dried. Also the best techniques to remove and separate said glue joints. It made my head spin. :) :) :) Nobody mentioned it, but I half expected one of them to talk about waving a dead chicken over the gluepot, but then again, those guys never share their innermost secrets.  ;D ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #26 on: June 22, 2021, 06:54:02 PM »
Forgot to mention Box Elder, but have yet to find a decent tree on the place.  Usually it is decayed when I find it with the red stripe.  
Most everything I enjoy doing turns out to be work

Offline Woodpecker52

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2021, 06:19:56 PM »
Bluesmen in Mississippi just use to nail a few wires on the house posts and pluck away.  I have seen some use a broom handle and wooden cigar boxes, would also make drums out of plastic hydraulic buckets and steel oil drums.  They would all be on the porches playing and watching the chickens under the boards.  Lots of good music came from those porch, and backdoor  observations.
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Online LeeB

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2021, 04:21:20 PM »
I didn't saw out the slab but it came from a sycamore slab I gave to my neighbors nephew so he could try his hand at
 guitar building. 



 
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Offline kwaldron199

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2021, 09:42:45 PM »
We were in the business of musical instruments for a number of years. Here is a jpg of a 3D CNC neck file with some dimensions. 14 Fret Martin Style OM/OOO layout file. Also including photo's of Osage Orange, Walnut, Cherry, Curly Maple guitars and 1 curly maple mandolin, and one curly maple violin. We tried and used many more local woods for all kinds of instruments as we built double bass, violins, mandolins, guitars, ukuleles, and a number of other instruments.  Quarter sawn is always best for instrument, off quarter will work and depending on the string pull even flat sawn of some species and some types of instruments will work.... instruments like ukulele have by far less tension on the neck than a steel string guitar. We always used truss rods or graphite for neck reinforcement on anything that was questionable.  

kw



 

 



 

 

 

 

 




 

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Offline Brucer

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2021, 11:55:59 PM »
Bruce    LT40HDG28 bandsaw
"Complex problems have simple, easy to understand wrong answers."

Offline Satamax

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2021, 01:14:40 AM »
Thing is, I want to build using woods that grow on my farm.  Spruce doesn't grow here.  We have bur oak, ash, hackberry, walnut, mulberry, osage orange,elm, juniper, cottonwood.  Probably a few trees I don't recall right now. Tempted to put a walnut face on it.  Saw a really cool oak faced guitar someone was playing on tv one time, had the grain angled like a V shape, and had amazing rays on the front.
If you can find big enough trees, i would say go for walnut back and sides, and i think i would try a juniper top. IIRC Osage Orange has been used in guitars too. https://www.google.com/search?source=univ&tbm=isch&q=Osage+Orange+guitar&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjj-fvMgLLxAhUM3IUKHc45AFIQjJkEegQICBAC&biw=1280&bih=616
There is a few example of hackberry acoustic guitars, 
And a fantastic looking mulberry guitar from cf Martin. 
Guitars out of Bur oak, ash, and elm, that has also been done before. 
Cottonwood, i wouldn't touch. 
By the way, i think buying a book about guitarmaking would be a good idea. One i love! 
Guitarmaking: Tradition and Technology, A Complete Reference for the Design & Construction of the Steel-String Folk Guitar & the Classical Guitar by Cumpiano, William; Natelson, Jonathan D.: Very Good Hardcover (1987) 1st Edition, Signed by one of the Authors | Books from the Past
Also exists in paperback. 
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Offline farmfromkansas

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2021, 07:58:46 AM »
I have some pieces of that curly walnut like the one example.  And did buy a book. Guess the next thing is find some time, and just try building one.  The scarf joint is a good idea.
Most everything I enjoy doing turns out to be work

Offline Satamax

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #33 on: July 23, 2021, 11:50:11 PM »
In French, sorry! 



There the extended version in the links if you watch it on youtube. 
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2021, 05:51:50 AM »
That's an interesting way to do QS. I wish I knew what species they were sawing. Looks like it might be spruce.
 Do those other videos carry the process further?
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: sawing guitar parts
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2021, 06:15:04 AM »
I fell in the rabbit hole a little bit and found this one from the same channel. All in French but it shows some of the process in what I think is a luthier's school of sorts. Probably a working shop that takes on apprentices which is still the most common way this trade is passed on today. These folks are making fiddles (I imagine they call them violins  ;D ) and there are some good pieces where they show the amount of carving involved and tool usage, etc. Making a flat top guitar of modern design does not require these steps but I was always fascinated by the amount of have carving required to make arch tops of any kind, cellos, violins, bass, guitars, or mandolins. Fascinating and tedious work.

Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.


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