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Author Topic: Splitting firewood in August for this winter-or bite the bullet and buy?  (Read 6688 times)

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Offline Slabs

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A bit of totally useless information:

It takes one BTU to elevate one pound(about one pint) of water one degree farenheit.
It takes 970 BTU to change one pound of water into water vapor.
Water evaporates at almost any temperature, even below freezing(sublimation).
100% saturated wood is 50% water by weight.

I can't remember the source of these figures but the saturation is probably from Vermont Castings.

If you're covering the woodracks with plastic, clear plastic tends to percipitate water on the underside and black plastic not quite so much.  Moreover, black plastic seems to last quite a bit longet possibly because of a greater tolerance to ultraviolet.

I prefer my wood seasoned a minimum of 1 year.  Got maybe four years racked up now just because it became available.  Yeah, some of it will deteriorate before it's burned but My wood cutting days are limited.

Y'all enjoy and keep warm.
Slabs  : Offloader, slab and sawdust Mexican, mill mechanic and electrician, general flunky.  Woodshop, metal woorking shop and electronics shop.

Offline John Mc

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While water will evaporate at any temperature (or at least any temperature that humans are likely to encounter in nature), any migration through the interior of the wood is slowed dramatically when the wood is frozen solid. In these circumstances, most of what you'll lose to sublimation is surface moisture, or moisture that is very close to the surface.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 36 coupe

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Since you are near Worcester and the Emerald Ash Beetle you may as well cut any white ash you have or buy some.

Offline jdonovan

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It takes one BTU to elevate one pound(about one pint) of water one degree farenheit.
It takes 970 BTU to change one pound of water into water vapor.
Water evaporates at almost any temperature, even below freezing(sublimation).
100% saturated wood is 50% water by weight.

Depending on moisture, when burning less than fully dried wood you can use upwards of 20-25% of the energy just to drive off the moisture.

Offline biker250

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I'm not really worried about losing energy to evaporate water as I have a virtually unlimited supply of green wood that I could cut.  I'm only worried about keeping the creosote at bay....being a first time wood burner, it's all new to me and I want to make sure I know what I'm doing when it comes to creosote due to all the bad things I've heard about it....it almost has me scared.  haha
Self-reliance is the only road to true freedom

Offline Holmes

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Since you are near Worcester and the Emerald Ash Beetle you may as well cut any white ash you have or buy some.

We have around here the Asian Long horned beetle. It is an invasive and shows no preference for hardwood tree type. The towns that have it are having all the trees cut down, chipped and destroyed. No fire wood is allowed.
Think like a farmer.

Offline Al_Smith

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You're probabley better off as has already been mentioned to not load the fire box up as much .You keep a hot fire with the stack temp up to about 300 degrees you'll get less creosote .

Creosote is hard to avoid though especially on a long flue because the farther away it is from the fire the more it collects.

Offline John Mc

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I'm not really worried about losing energy to evaporate water as I have a virtually unlimited supply of green wood that I could cut.  I'm only worried about keeping the creosote at bay....being a first time wood burner, it's all new to me and I want to make sure I know what I'm doing when it comes to creosote due to all the bad things I've heard about it....it almost has me scared.  haha

Even if you have unlimited free wood, you still need to think about loss of energy. That energy is what is making the fire burn hot. When you take too much away, the fire cools.

I burn seasoned wood, though I did have one season where I got behind and it was not optimal.  I basically ended up with a bit more build-up when I cleaned the chimney at the end of the year.

Don't get scared off.  It is manageable, you just may want to give your chimney an extra cleaning partway through the year, and next year, get an earlier start.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Slabs

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I'm only worried about keeping the creosote at bay....being a first time wood burner, it's all new to me and I want to make sure I know what I'm doing when it comes to creosote due to all the bad things I've heard about it....it almost has me scared.  haha




I forgot to mention my experiences with liquid creosote puking out of the plenum at the base of the stack.  That stuff is wicked and resists strong alkalis and bleach for cleanup.  All from using inadequately dried wood.
Slabs  : Offloader, slab and sawdust Mexican, mill mechanic and electrician, general flunky.  Woodshop, metal woorking shop and electronics shop.


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