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General Forestry => General Board => Topic started by: Sedgehammer on July 26, 2021, 08:06:35 AM

Title: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on July 26, 2021, 08:06:35 AM
Going to need a planer for my various projects going forward. Can be a stationary type, as I can make a cart to move. Prefer a self feeding one. $1,500 or so budget. 

Also how does a planer/molder work?

Thanks
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Southside on July 26, 2021, 09:05:51 AM
As to how they work - you put ugly, nasty, fresh off the mill, wood in one side and out the other pops perfection, dental crown moulding.  :D At least that is the theory.  In all seriousness there is a big difference between a planer and a moulder.  What is is you need to make?  
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: VB-Milling on July 26, 2021, 10:04:35 AM
Williams and Hussey
Find a decent used one with knives for the price you're looking for. Capacity is a little limited but it depends on what you are looking to do.

Edit: rereading your post, it looks like you primary want a planer so my suggestion isn't too relevant.




Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Tom King on July 26, 2021, 03:23:38 PM
I bought a Grizzly 12" planer/molder off Craigslist that's probably in that price range new.  

I used it as a molder once, but I mostly just need a few feet of something, so make that by hand with molding planes.  It did fine as a molder too, but is pretty slow, since you have to do multiple passes.

As a planer, it is surprisingly good, for a finish planer.  The feed rollers are rubber, and with sharp knives, the pieces come out with little left to do to them.

I use it as the final pass when I'm making replacement window sash, and use that surface as the outside, which will be painted, without touching it again.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: customsawyer on July 27, 2021, 06:42:03 AM
Check with WDH and see where he got that tree smoother from. :D
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: caveman on July 27, 2021, 07:59:57 AM
I would look for a used one in your price range.  There are deals to be had if you are patient waiting on machines that were previously owned by cabinet shops, schools, old men that are no longer here and their survivors want the stuff gone, or folks who went big into a hobby and now are focused on other squirrels.

Good luck with your search.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: farmfromkansas on July 27, 2021, 08:16:14 AM
I bought a Grizzly 15" wide planer, G0453px model.  Has a helical cutterhead, and works well.  It is not a commercial grade, but works well for planing several boards at a time.  Do not expect it to plane boards by the truck load.  Motor will get hot and shut down.  But you can run it for an hour at a time and it is fine. Dust collection on it is great, have not broken one tooth on the planer.  Turned the cutters last year for the first time. If you are going to make trim for your new house, get a shaper with power feed.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: peakbagger on July 27, 2021, 08:25:28 AM
If you do look for used equipment be careful that the equipment is not 3 phase. A lot of the larger planers from businesses and institutions are 3 phase. Yes there are devices that can be bought or rigged up to convert single phase household to 3 phase but its can cost quite a bit.

There are a lot of 15" Deltas and delta clones out there that do a reasonable job with single phase power.  For $1500 you can buy a new Grizzly version (with standard knives). I think Delta gave up trying to compete in this market as I think they were buying them from the same shops in Taiwan that the other clone firms do. Nevertheless its a four post design and lot beefier than the portable 12" and 13" units.  

A big upgrade is carbide insert heads in place of knives. The inserts last longer and the inserts can be rotated for new edge while the knifes usually need removing and sent out for sharpening. Older units can be retrofitted to carbide but in the 15" range its $800 to $1000 experience. Carbide heads are decidedly quieter.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Erik A on July 27, 2021, 08:32:17 AM
You might look at the hawk planer. I think they are made in KS so almost local to you. Also, you can put in molding knives or a gang saw if you are making molding. New price may be above your budget, but worth a look!
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on July 27, 2021, 10:07:16 AM
As to how they work - you put ugly, nasty, fresh off the mill, wood in one side and out the other pops perfection, dental crown moulding.  :D At least that is the theory.  In all seriousness there is a big difference between a planer and a moulder.  What is is you need to make?  

Ha, ha. I guess I should've put it if a molder combo is worth  buying  vs a stand alone


@peakbagger (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=44288) yes, many are 3 phase. Have had to watch that on some other things. Sounds like the insert head is a lot better
Thanks everyone else also so far
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Tom King on July 27, 2021, 02:41:30 PM
I wouldn't recommend that anyone get that Grizzly planer/molder, I mentioned earlier, as their only planer.  One that size will put you to sleep taking any material off to amount to anything.  I only use it for the last pass on finish work.

If you're going to smooth much wood at all, you need weight, and horsepower.  I don't know of any combination planer/molder that's in that category.  There may be one, but I would expect it would be Way out of a 1500 dollar budget.

It would be worth your time seeing some different ones run some wood.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Crusarius on July 27, 2021, 03:51:40 PM
I ended up buying a WEN with the spiral head. Doesn't take off a ton of material per pass but very happy with how it works and it was less than $400 when I bought it.

If you are looking for a basic homeowner planer this may be worth looking at. I am very happy. One day I may spend more money and get a nicer one but for what I am doing the end result is a nice smooth board.

Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: alan gage on July 27, 2021, 04:09:10 PM
Going to need a planer for my various projects going forward.


What sorts of various projects would these be? Hard to recommend something without knowing what you want it to do.
Alan
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 27, 2021, 05:22:02 PM
I don't know anything about moulders.  I think the best "lunchbox" planer is the Dewalt 735.  It is a 13" planer that does a very good job.  If I were to buy a new planer/moulder I'm sure it would be from Grizzly.  They sell a 13" planer/molder and molding knives to go with it.  About $1500.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: jrsloan1 on July 27, 2021, 05:33:25 PM
I've purchased two used Woodmaster 718 each for under the $1500.  I've had to add some blades, and other items but they were both usable as planers just as I found them.  Search Craig's list, etc and keep your eyes open.  They seem to be well built heavy duty units (several hundred pounds each) and have lots of application/capabilities.   They work very well for me. 
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 27, 2021, 05:36:10 PM
I had a foley/belsaw 12" planer/molder that I considered putting some money into, but decided to spend the money on a shaper and feeder to make flooring.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: reride82 on July 27, 2021, 06:15:43 PM
Size of the material you'll be running through it determines what size of planer/moulder you'll need. I have two woodmaster planer/moulders. One is a 712(takes 7" tall by 12" wide material) and a 725(7" by 25"). I bought them both used, so they were relatively inexpensive. $400 for the little one and $850 for the big one. I use the small one exclusively for trim/moulding/siding and the big one for planing boards and slabs. I'd like to get the attachment to hook routers up to cut the tongue and groove for flooring but haven't made that jump yet. If you're doing boards and some moulding, I'd suggest a 12", but if you're looking at doing slabs or large glue-ups for cabinets then I'd go bigger.

Levi
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Larry on July 27, 2021, 08:32:51 PM

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/P2180002.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1627428184)


(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/P2180006.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1627428184)


A Belsaw at work.  Pictures were from 17 years ago when I ran all the trim for a 4,000 square foot house.  They can be found frequently in the $200 to $400 range.  Most will need a new rubber infeed roller (cheap) from Belsaw.  They will have a motor from 2 to 5 horsepower.  Anything works but the 5 hp will take a 1/8" bite when planing a 12" oak board.  At one time I think I had four of them set up for different tasks.  I always got molding knives custom made in Kansas City.  Fax em a drawing and had a knife two days later at reasonable cost.

A Woodmaster would do the same with dust collection, variable speed, and probably a few other neat options.

A locale craftsman, Gary Striegler, is the poster boy for Woodmaster.  He teaches, writes, and builds award winning seven figure homes.  l linked to his trim page for examples of what can be done with simple machines.  Gary Striegler Trim (https://craftsmanbuildersnwa.com/our-work/gallery/view/category/7)  This guy really walks the talk.  Excellent craftsman and just a fine person.

Next up would be the Williams & Hussey along with the Grizzly clone called the Shop Fox W1812.  I've had both.  Less rejects when molding over the Belsaw but they don't do a very good job planing and limited to 7" width.

Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on July 28, 2021, 03:49:53 PM
good info all, thanks

I am looking at some used belsaw units, but am looking for a heliacal head if possible

As to what I'll be using it all for. That's an unknown as I don't know how far down the rabbit hole I will go with doing all the work or how fine my wife wants the beams, floor joists and related
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on September 15, 2021, 09:04:23 AM
Is a powermatic 100 any good?
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: VB-Milling on September 15, 2021, 10:01:19 AM
I like them.  Old iron is good in my opinion;  I have a lot of old iron.

Sometimes too old can be bad though.  The drive gears tend to wear out on heavily used machines.  (like if you were buying it from a cabinet shop or the like)

If you're looking at older machines, the price difference between a 12in and a 15in machine can be negligible and you'll never feel bad about having that extra 3inches.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: muggs on September 16, 2021, 03:02:15 PM
I have had a Powermatic 16 inch planer for about 30 years, It has been fine.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: dougtrr2 on September 17, 2021, 09:44:01 AM
Is a powermatic 100 any good?
Yes, Powermatic 100's are a sought after small planer.  There are a lot of references and threads regarding that planer on OWWM.org
Doug in SW IA
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on September 17, 2021, 08:38:54 PM
Couldn't find anything in my price range close enough. Most of the woodmasters were 12". Bought a grizzly 15" G1021 on  wheeled cart. The guys dad did some hobby wood working with it. Paid $400

Going to order a helical head for it me thinks I can. Any brand preferred ?
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: VB-Milling on September 17, 2021, 11:28:03 PM
Check if grizzly has the option to order a helical head.  Sometimes they offer the upgrade.

No sense in spending shelix money on a grizzly machine for what you're doing.

Just my 2 cents.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on September 18, 2021, 07:53:34 AM
Check if grizzly has the option to order a helical head.  Sometimes they offer the upgrade.

No sense in spending shelix money on a grizzly machine for what you're doing.

Just my 2 cents.
Shelix and grizzly are both $748. Can buy a Elephas for $572 thru amazonian
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: firefighter ontheside on September 18, 2021, 03:16:10 PM
I would say helical heads are worth it in any machine.  Shelix are made in USA and grizzly heads are not if that matters.  I believe the shelix heads will be the same diameter as original and the grizzly will be smaller diameter.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: farmfromkansas on September 19, 2021, 04:56:35 PM
The point of getting a helical head for me is that all I have to do is either clean or turn the cutters, and do not have to remove the blades, sharpen and re-install.  Putting blades in a cutterhead and getting them set correctly and even are not easy when you are young, but when you are old and need reading glasses to read your tape measure, makes helical the only way to go for me.
Title: Re: Best planer (planer/molder) for the money non commercial operation
Post by: Sedgehammer on September 20, 2021, 10:51:15 PM
The point of getting a helical head for me is that all I have to do is either clean or turn the cutters, and do not have to remove the blades, sharpen and re-install.  Putting blades in a cutterhead and getting them set correctly and even are not easy when you are young, but when you are old and need reading glasses to read your tape measure, makes helical the only way to go for me.
This is my thoughts pretty much summed up