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Author Topic: Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.  (Read 2018 times)

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Offline Remle

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Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.
« on: October 22, 2014, 10:22:37 AM »
I'm considering moving and saving an old timber frame structure, about 14 X 20. My main concern is that the post are rotted off and would need to be extended using a bladed scarf joint to make sufficient head room. Currently the post are only 7 ft. or so tall. I would like to increase the head room to say 10 ft. The joint would then be at or near the center height of the post. In reviewing the topics about such extension their is no mention of what limits their are as to location with in the height of the post. Would joints be restricted to say the bottom one third or are their no limitations as to location ?

Online Jim_Rogers

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Re: Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2014, 10:25:54 AM »
I would think that the only limit would be where other horizontal timber join with the post. You may have to consider other joinery there.

I don't know of any reason why you can't put it in the middle.

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Offline Remle

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Re: Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2014, 10:59:26 AM »
Wow, that was a fast reply, thanks Jim. I'm sure I'll have more questions as this project unfolds. I spoke briefly to the owner and he may let me buy the structure. But first I need to research zoning, etc, to see if I would be allowed to rebuild it on my property. Their are 6 buildings with in a 5 mile radius that have fallen down in the last year or so, they were all huge structures. This one seems manageable where the others were to big. I'll update this as I find out information, thanks again.

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2014, 05:51:10 PM »
I've repaired many post bottoms with bladed scarfs, or variations. The problem with extending all of the posts is that you create a weak point on every posts. On one barn that I raised 1'-9 1/2", we scarfed five posts, and replaced the other five, which really needed replacement anyway. This was the architects specification. If you look in my timber framing gallery, you will should see a bunch of different scarfs. (scarves?  :D )
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Offline Remle

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Re: Post extension using the bladed scarf joint.
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2014, 08:34:06 PM »
Dave
I see the pictures in your gallery. My neighbor mentioned entirely replacing the post as well. He thought that it might be easier to cut a new frame rather than rehab the old one. Much will depend on what the zoning/ building officer has to say. Hopefully I'll catch up to him on Thursday. This weekend I plan on taking photo's of the building and measurements and should have a better idea of what exactly is required to remodel this structure to meet my needs.


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