The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.  (Read 47331 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 31498
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1220 on: May 13, 2021, 06:00:48 AM »
I have people that walk into the store and say loudly I need a plumper. As I say, if I was a plumper I would not be working here for these wages.  ::)
I could fill a book up with questions.
Than they need a shut off valve. What size? Oh about this big with their finger and thumb. Or I don't know. ::) Or I took a picture with my phone.
But there are some people that know what I am saying and go back home and get a measurement. But most will stand there and expect me to know what size they need.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1221 on: May 13, 2021, 07:31:57 AM »
Yes, this planning to have the right stuff with me is important and takes time. I don't think too fast, so I keep it in my head all the time and when I think of something I either fetch it and put it in the pile, or write it down so I don't forget. The game is to not come up short when circumstances change. On the local property management jobs, it's not so bad if I need something I don't have, like a chain or a choker. I bring it next time and do it then. But the main thing is to keep working and not get stopped.
 Yeah, people are funny. I am seeing a lot of this with the mushroom logs. I get an email from a fella or gal with 'mushroom logs' in the subject and something like the following:

"I could pickup at any location 

Please let me know if this is possible"

Then nothing but a name at the bottom, no phone number. I kid you not, this is an exact and complete quote from an email. I was getting two like this every other day for a while. So I came up with a 'form response" that I send back, it lists the simple details I need as well as a little about how and when I get these logs. I end it by saying "Just answer those 3 questions and I will get you on the list" (how many, what species, preferred size), but it seems like they don't ever follow up. Maybe my questions were too hard? ;D In case of that I tell them that if they are new and can't answer those questions, just tell me what they are growing and I can give them some basic advice to get them started. I have not decided how many of these folks I will follow up on (again) when I have logs on hand. Most want 1-4 logs, that's not even 20 bucks. When I have commercial buyers waiting for 100-400 or more logs, I think I might lean their way. :D I hate those inquiries where they say "I need a few", "I need a lot", " i need some", or "I will take what you have", when they really mean "I need 2" or "a lot" means 10. Then I get a real commercial inquiry and 'A lot' means 5,000 logs. It can make you crazy if you let it.
 I have been lucky in that most of my customers and clients so far are people I know. Sometimes I think they give me business just to help me get started, but they seem to be happy with what they are getting in return. Yes, I have picked up one or two who are high maintenance, but living here for so long and knowing how those folks can be I have developed an approach that dances somewhere between 'friendly dumb guy' and "grouchy curmudgeon'. I can pull out either card based on the attitude I am handed. I have also learned to be honest about what I can and can't do, as well as what I won't and will do. I don't cross those lines and make them clear. So the person that tries to talk me into or out of something to get the deal they want or expect, has a tough row to hoe. I always try to meet the unrealistic expectations with a handful of educational questions. If they circle around with the same stuff, I give up. They are the customer and need to decide what they want, if they can't do that, I move on. I learned a lot about refining this approach from reading what the folks here on the FF have shared. I was pretty good at it before, but now I think I am getting a lot more practice at dealing with 'those folks' and am getting better.

Yeah, I get a lot of those "Hey my neighbor is taking down a tree, do you want to come get it?" or "can you come get this tree and make me some lumber from it?" calls, but they are getting less and less. It's a fine line between those and the calls I get from loggers and land clearers "Hey, I just took down some nice red oak, if you can get over here with your trailer this afternoon I can load you." I don't want those calls to stop.

Its time to throw the gear in the truck and hit the road. Maybe it will break 60 today!
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline doc henderson

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7214
  • Age: 60
  • Location: Hutchinson, Ks
  • Gender: Male
  • Evil Prevails when Good Men Standby and Do Nothing
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1222 on: May 13, 2021, 09:18:20 AM »
I think you could discount the price as the number goes up.  1 log could be 10 bucks.  or 9.99 if you want to play those games.  I would not get down to 3 bucks a log (or what ever the price is) till you reach 100 logs for wholesale.  or then it could be by the pallet if you decide to store and ship them that way.  1 log is really almost as much trouble as 10 and so on.  
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1223 on: May 13, 2021, 09:45:02 AM »
Tom,

   As you probably well know, you will quickly find it is easier to remember what to bring based on what you needed and did not have last time. ;) Also when you struggle to do a task you will remember things like when cutting and turning logs and such as - "this would be a lot easier if I'd brought my cant hook" or such. I store my tools and equipment together so when I see one, I remember to bring the other - like wedges and my felling ax, magic Hook and 6' 1/4" chains to use with it, etc.

    I remember when I was in the USMC I graded myself when I'd set up a supply dump in the field based on what I brought that was used or what I forgot and was needed. On one exercise I got a call from one of the general's staff for an 8' fluorescent light fixture. I offered them a couple more Coleman type gas lanterns and did not beat myself up at all on that one as we were supposed to be in tactical mode and they seemed to think they were back at the CP in the rear.

   It is hard to fill a customer's order when he has no idea what he wants. On over half my jobs a customer will ask me "What should we cut this log into?" I tell them "I'd cut it into whatever I needed and if I did not need it whatever I thought would sell" as appropriate. 

   As you mentioned most people mean well but they just don't know. I can deal with them. The ones who want to act like they know it all but don't know which end of a cant hook to hold are the ones that annoy me. Oh well, at least they teach you patience.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1224 on: May 13, 2021, 08:14:50 PM »
Doc, you make another good point (as I have come to expect from you) and I will have to give that some thought as to how I want to cut the numbers, but think on it I will. 
 Howard you are correct on all points and I look at the 'working on the road' thing as a challenge in logistics and planning. I too challenge myself on these things and enjoy it as part of the game. Let's just see how it goes. It's a long drive to the nearest hardware store up that way, but at least there is good hot food available not far away. :) I love that Conesville Country Store!
 
 Now I hope you folks get a kick out of this next new development like I did. I got another email from the guy at Cornell (he's the guy that wanted 1,000 logs delivered to Brooklyn, but we have delayed that plan as too ambitious for right now). He would still like to get 300-500 logs from me for Brooklyn to be picked up at my place or something along those lines. Today he was asking when I could commit to a number (which I could not answer yet) and he offered to pay 50% up front if that would help. I reminded him I take no deposits except for custom furniture on occasion (expenses) and preferred to do business on a person's word. 
 Here's the interesting part. He said he was contacted by a fella with a sailing vessel that is looking for unique products to send down the Hudson River from the Catskills as has been done for the past 300 years. So they wanted to know if I would be willing (for a transport fee) to move the logs the the maritime museum where the sloop will be docked in Kingston. That's a 15 minute drive for me, 1 mile from where I used to work before I retired. They were thinking they could run a workshop on mushroom growing just before the boat launched. He wondered if I was up for something like that.  ;D
 Well just based on the transport payment he offered, yeah. I would have to do a couple of trips based on the number of logs, but no big deal, just work and time and the payment is fair. I could also 'maximize my load size' because it is a short, low speed run. But the whole thing sounds like fun for a one time deal, even two times. I like the fact that this process exactly reproduces the process used for 300 years where the products created and drawn from these mountains were taken from the woods or quarries, transported down the Plank Road to the water front in Kingston, loaded on barges, sloops, passenger ships, and other craft, and floated down to NYC. All the old sidewalks in Manhattan came from right around my house (Bluestone) as did the stone cobbles that made the streets. When concrete came into use (also produced up in this river valley), the industry switched to tanning leather up here and they striped the forest clean of first growth trees to get the inner bark for the tannin. The built whole towns around that industry including many around Brage (Palenville and Tannersville among others). When that died out they started chair factories all over the hills to use the hardwood that was available. So the irony I see in this is that I get these logs from up by Barge, I drive down Rt. 42 which was one of the oldest cut roads between the hills coming down from Schoharie county to Rt. 28 which was called the Plank Road back in the 1700's, they stop at my house on Stone road, which was a road laid with bluestone slabs 4" thick to support the weight of the stone boats (steel wheeled wagons) bringing out bluestone slabs headed to NYC, then they continue on via the Plank road again to the waterfront in Kingston which was a huge commercial operation going back 300 years ago and still is to a certain degree. The British landed on that same spot in 1777 when they came to burn Kingston, the capitol of the state at that time. Anyway, they get loaded on a boat and headed to the city. I think that is pretty cool.
 "Sure" I told him, "I am in. I can do what you ask and give you some more of my time if it can help you out with the workshop or whatever". Maybe I can make some more local contacts for log sales, who knows? I don't care, sounds like fun and it sure is different. I have been meaning to hook up with the museum anyway on other things. 

Today I was dropping a few trees and clearing culls to do some thinning at a clients place I had a lot of run-in's with thorny type stuff, even took a thorn right through the leather thumb pad on a glove and lodged hard into my skin. Had to shut the saw off, and take off the other glove to fish it out, MAN that hurt! I am seriously thinking about getting a brush saw. Interesting thing though as I was culling, I came upon a brand new Ash seedling doing just fine! Then I found an ash stump with a lot of epicormic sprouts, THEN I found a 4" diameter Ash growing straight and true with NO evidence of the borer. In fact I found 3 healthy Ash trees about 4" diameter. That not only made my day, it meant a whole lot more. Maybe they have moved on? Maybe these new trees are more resistant? I don't know, but I have to say it is SO very good to see new ash trees growing. I haven't seen young healthy ash leaves around here in ten years or more. I was SO excited, the property owner thought I was loosing it a little I think. WOW that was really neat. So today was indeed another day and it brought me new joy.
 I got home after that, put my saw on the bench and sharpened it up for the next job. Rewired a bad light on my trailer so that the turn signal (both) work, and did a few more things in the shop before coming in and answering emails, etc. Every day is an adventure of sorts, and that's just the way I like it.
 Tomorrow is another day, right?
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1225 on: May 13, 2021, 08:37:22 PM »
   Sounds like a great day and thanks for the history lesson. I think I mentioned visiting an old, working tannery in northern Cameroon one time. They had dug out pits they filled with water and bird crap and seeds and such to preserve the leather. I love seeing, hearing and reading about those processes. I did a project at Corning HQ in Corning NY one time and they told me all the supplies used to come up the river on barges which amazed me as the river did not look that wide or that deep.

   In Norway we visited the last water powered steel mill. It was basically a working museum now. They used to the water to turn a bellows which added O2 to the charcoal they used before folks discovered Coke made from coal. The extra air burned the charcoal hotter and melted the iron ore. Prior to the UK discovering how to make coke from coal they used charcoal and Norway produced the world's highest quality steel. When they learned make Coke the UK could also produce high quality steel and they took over the world's steel making leadership. I had done a project at a Steel mill in northern WV/Eastern OH and knew the basics but had never thought about using water power to pump air or using charcoal instead of coke.

    I wish the kids today could go visit working sites like that to help them understand and appreciate the work it takes to build things. That's why I like to do workshops with my mill and I can see mushroom workshops being a big hit too. At the end of the workshop you need to feed the students a good mushroom and sausage pizza. :D
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1226 on: May 13, 2021, 09:21:31 PM »
.......... At the end of the workshop you need to feed the students a good mushroom and sausage pizza. :D
As the Brits say 'Not bloody likely'. :D ;D I don't eat mushrooms. Besides I am just a sideshow at this thing (if it even happens). I will be playing the part of the 'old guy who brought the logs down from the mountains'. I expect I can do that just fine. That's all I can do. Let's just see how this progresses over time. 
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1227 on: May 13, 2021, 10:33:51 PM »
   Dang! And mushroom and sausage is my favorite pizza. I guess I will have come up with another plan to scrounge a meal. Maybe I can call the MM and get him to give me lessons as he posts the best ones I have seen here.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1228 on: May 14, 2021, 08:09:25 AM »
Not to worry Howard, if it's a free meal you want I can easily arrange that to be something much better than pizza. Sorry, no grits around these parts (I think we have a law or something), but there are 4 very nice restaurants within a short walk of the museum where you can enjoy some fine food while sitting outside and overlooking the water. In fact, the one closest to the museum has a deck and dock hanging out over the water. One of those places used to be Barge's favorite watering hole (or so I have heard) when he worked at the marina when the boat was in for repairs, just a half mile down the creek. I myself have been known to throw back a few there during business lunches.
 So, opportunities abound. ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1229 on: May 14, 2021, 08:44:17 AM »
Tom,

  Thanks for the invite and reassurance I won't starve when I come up. I can pack grits to bring along just like any other essentials. I had an uncle stationed in Minnesota or some other glaciated clime and he kept asking the local grocery for grits. The owner finally told him to get grits he had to buy at least 100 lbs and he did not think he could sell that many so my uncle told him buy them and if they did not sell, he'd buy them himself. The man bought them and advertised "We have grits" and had so much business he had a hard time keeping them in stock.

  I'm still trying to get my mind wrapped around the fact the New York Mushroom King does not like to eat mushrooms. ::) Its kind of like finding Smithfield foods is a Jewish or Muslim conglomeration or that Tyson's Poultry owner the head of PETA or such.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1230 on: May 14, 2021, 09:12:44 AM »
Well I know you are not a drinking man Howard, but try to think of it this way: Would you patronize a bar where the bartender was always drunk? ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Online Hilltop366

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3253
  • Location: Nova Scotia
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1231 on: May 14, 2021, 09:14:05 AM »
The grits were probably used as a substitute for traction sand. ;D

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1232 on: May 14, 2021, 10:02:06 AM »
   You know Southerners will eventually inherit the earth because we are more flexible. We love our grits but we can easily accept and adapt to a diet of hash browns, home fries or cottage fries or such when none are available. The next time we have a huge potato famine like Ireland had between 1845-1849 the Eskimos up north will be dropping like flies while the highly adaptable southern gentlemen and their Belles with be chowing down on grits and leftover mushroom pizza.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Online Hilltop366

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3253
  • Location: Nova Scotia
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1233 on: May 14, 2021, 11:44:31 AM »
We will have to revert back to the old times around here when poor people ate lobster and haddock, the poor kids were embarrassed to go to school with their lobster sandwich on homemade bread and would try to trade with the richer kids for baloney on store bought bread.(true story)

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 10421
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1234 on: May 14, 2021, 03:06:19 PM »
Hilltop,

   Yes. I read somewhere that indentured servants coming to work for families in New England even had clauses in their contracts certifying they would not be fed lobster more than 2 times per week. 

    In the south the slaves were fed the lesser cuts off the pig such as the ribs and shoulders while the owners ate the hams and loins and such. They had to figure a way to make the ribs and such tender and tasty enough to eat so they came up with slow cooked BBQ and such. The owners tasted it and realized how good they were and those became prime cuts.

   I remember when chicken wings were dirt cheap. Then people figured out if they cut them at the joints and fried them they were very good so they became expensive too. 

   I had a S. Vietnamese co-worker in Bagram, Afghaniland who had been a  POW to N. Viet Nam. Another POW had been an Ag teacher or such the North Vietnamese captors put him in charge of raising a pig. When it was grown they would butcher it and the officers got the choice cuts, the guards got the next and the POWs got the offal and scraps. The teacher was also familiar with the local plants so when the pig was nearly grown he would feed it a particular plant and it would start frothing at the mouth and staggering around so he would go report to the guards "Sir, the pig is sick." The guard would look at it, concur and shoot it and tell him "You and the other POWs can have it" and they would give him another pig to raise. I don't guess they ever caught on to what he was doing.

   I mentioned above why Southerners will outlast the northerners. To take it a step further Cajun's will outlast us all as there is one thing they will not eat but nobody can remember what it is.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline nybhh

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Ulster County, NY
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1235 on: May 14, 2021, 03:34:00 PM »
I was born in Alabama, spent the first half of my life in Georgia and know a thing or two about grits.  The second half of my life has been spent in grit deprived New York but thanks to a healthy Italian population here, there is no shortage of Polenta which, at the risk of blasphemy, is every bit as good as grits and usually prepared a heckuva lot better.   :o
Woodmizer LT15, Kubota L3800, Stihl MS261 & 40 acres of ticks trees.

Offline Andries

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1594
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Oakbank, Manitoba
  • Gender: Male
  • Making buildings out of big curvy logs
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1236 on: May 14, 2021, 03:39:38 PM »
. .  The next time we have a huge potato famine like Ireland had between 1845-1849 the Eskimos up north will be dropping like flies . . .
I'm enjoying the banter between the Southern gents and the wanna-be glaciated folks, . . . But.
Our bison herds will sustain us Eskimos, just fine. 
Spuds, grits and whatever famines notwithstanding. There may be a polenta famine brewing, dunno. These are strange days my friends.
LT30G24, LT40G25
Ford 545 Series loaders
Stihl chainsaws

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1237 on: May 14, 2021, 03:41:00 PM »
Oh boy, and just when you think you know a guy!
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline Andries

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1594
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Oakbank, Manitoba
  • Gender: Male
  • Making buildings out of big curvy logs
    • Share Post
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1238 on: May 14, 2021, 03:48:07 PM »
Which American was it that said there were the things he knew he didn't know, and the things that he didn't know that he didn't know, but it was knowing that he couldn't ever know - was that knowable? 
I like that guy, a thoughtful thinker! 😆
LT30G24, LT40G25
Ford 545 Series loaders
Stihl chainsaws

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4842
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Staying Busy and out of trouble, 2020-21?.
« Reply #1239 on: May 14, 2021, 03:53:09 PM »
I don't know, unless, maybe I do?
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Trouble staying on the forum

Started by LeeB on Technical Support Topics

19 Replies
4010 Views
Last post August 26, 2009, 07:34:09 PM
by Ron Scott
xx
Not dead, just busy, very busy engineering and reengineering and rereengineering

Started by arnold113 on Sawmills and Milling

30 Replies
3359 Views
Last post April 20, 2015, 08:18:59 AM
by vfauto
laugh
Busy Busy Busy (Photos)

Started by JoeyLowe on Sawmills and Milling

40 Replies
9141 Views
Last post April 08, 2002, 08:50:50 AM
by Bibbyman
xx
Staying in a thread.... and... and...

Started by IMERC on Technical Support Topics

4 Replies
765 Views
Last post July 18, 2018, 10:06:29 PM
by IMERC
 


Powered by EzPortal