The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Log Cabin  (Read 19736 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Log Cabin
« on: January 30, 2006, 06:09:27 PM »
Hello everyone

Happy New Year.  I decided that I would build a log cabin for my hunting camp.  I have some white pine but would rather use hemlock since I have heard it will be ok and is not good for much else.  I also found a nice camp site with a stand of hemlock right on top of it. 

I was wondering how long the logs should season before I build the camp, if a foundation is necessary  in the woods, or should I just use burried concrete tubes on the corners.

If you had your choice for best size of log, what should it be, considering that I am thinking of a cabin no bigger than 14X20.

Finally, is anyone out there looking for some work this summer!

thanks

Stan

Offline Ernie_Edwards

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Copemish, Mi.
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2006, 06:29:50 PM »
Stan,
Four years ago I built my wifes blacksmith shop out of hemlock logs. It is on a short block foundation. Seeing how the logs deteriorate out in the woods I would be leary of a foundationless structure. Also plan on a good overhang so you don't have too much splashing from the dripline onto your logs.

I cut most of the logs in the early spring and found that the bark would come off very easily with a spud bar. When I had to cut a couple more late summer to finish it was a real bear getting the bark off, had to drawknife every square inch.

The structure is a 1 story, 24' x 24'.  Hemlock has a lot of taper and I tried to have logs that were 12"-14" on the butt.

I full scribed the length of the log with the chainsaw, basically a "VEE" out of the bottom of the log, scribed to fit the log under it. After all this time we have only had about  1/4"-1/2" settlement.

Still chinking it with Perma Chink and also used their stain/sealer and have been very happy with it.

Where are you located?

Good luck,

Ernie Edwards

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2006, 06:37:23 PM »
thanks Ernie,  thats helpful. I am in Norfolk Ct, the northwestern corner.  So if I cut my trees now, they should be ready for the summer?  Were you handling 24 foots logs, or did you use several logs for each span?  I have a lot of field stone, I could probably use for the foundation.  how long after you fell the trees did you skin them? 

Offline stumpy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 934
  • Age: 68
  • Location: Pewaukee, WI
  • Gender: Male
  • I feel alot more like I do now than I did before
    • Share Post
    • Rustic-woodfurniture/Stumpy's Wood Works
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2006, 06:45:27 PM »
I built a cabin 3 years ago and used a combination of White pine, red pine and balsam. I used whatever diameter the logs were and alternated left and right lay to adjust for the taper. I would suggest using as long as possible to cut down the number of butt joints. Built the frame and cut in the windows and doors later.
Where are you located?
Woodmizer LT30, NHL785 skidsteer, IH 444 tractor

Offline HARLEYRIDER

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Northwest CT
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • game cam
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2006, 09:26:37 PM »
Stan, Last fall, I went to canada for a handcrafted log building school, and  like ernie said, a winter harvest is best, and start peeling and building in april. the bark will peel easily with a spud. I never worked with hemlock, but  I hear its less prone to rot. cons are: taper, ring shake, and harder to work than pine.  You should mark and count how many  have a 18-22 inch butt (3-4 feet up from the ground)..so you can get 2 maybe 3 logs out of each tree.

did you build / repair your bridges yet?

Greenwoods Timberworks

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2006, 09:54:09 PM »
Thanks Harley.  Havent fixed the bridges yet but found a guy who would cut some black locust planks for the job in the spring. 

Offline woodbowl

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1841
  • Location: Florida Panhandle
  • Gender: Male
  • Making dough bowls, is a lot of work, but fun.
    • Share Post
    • Have Sawmill, Will Travel
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2006, 10:01:35 PM »
Stan, Last fall, I went to canada for a handcrafted log building school, ..... 



HARLEYRIDER, what school did you attend? I went to Pat Wolfe in McDonalds Corners, Ontario.
Full time custom sawing at the customers site since 1995.  WoodMizer LT40 Super Hyd.

Offline Ernie_Edwards

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Copemish, Mi.
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2006, 06:33:21 AM »
Stan,

As this was my first log cabin I did a few(lot) of things I would do different now.  I used full length logs whenever possible which made them about 27' long so that I had enough for the scribed joint at the corner with a bit sticking out past the corner. Used shorter logs to build to the windows and doors which did use up the shorter pieces generated by bucking some of the logs into shorter pieces to accomodate the bends that occured in the tree, wanted to use as straight a log as I could. Now I would try to find straighter trees to use and lay thru the windows and doors and cut them out with a chainsaw as Stumpy suggested. You will be rolling the logs on and off many times marking and cutting to get a good fit and having full walls allows you to just roll the log a little ways into the inside of the building and using scaffolding when the walls are higher do your scribing. With my shorter pieces I had to lift on and off for each adjustment in the scribe, what a pain.  When I got done there were no butt joints anywhere. When I first cut the trees down I did an inventory of the logs numbering each piece and recording the length and diameter on each end. Used my bigger pieces on the bottom and of course swapped ends on each course to take care of the taper. To further complicate it I took a shot  with a level at each corner and at each log end at a window or door. That allowed me to cut my "VEE" notch deep enough to bring the walls up level. Each log was peeled just when I needed it. Be generous in the use of 12" ardox nails at least at the corners and close to the ends where the doors and windows will be. The Amish built my log home and splined the windows and doors with a 2x4 to handle settlement. I just put a 3x3 angle iron on the back of the door jamb which slid into a chainsaw slot on the log ends in the opening. Worked great, and when the Amish saw what I did they liked enough that they said they would be trying it too.

All in all a very satisfying project and look foward to my next log cabin, which will be a new sugar shack to replace the building I an set up in new with the evaporator. Am considering maple logs as it is a maple sugar shack.

Have fun. Wish I was closer.

Ernie Edwards

Offline HARLEYRIDER

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Northwest CT
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • game cam
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2006, 09:07:01 AM »
HARLEYRIDER, what school did you attend? I went to Pat Wolfe in McDonalds Corners, Ontario.

Pats the Man....different location
Greenwoods Timberworks

Offline woodbowl

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1841
  • Location: Florida Panhandle
  • Gender: Male
  • Making dough bowls, is a lot of work, but fun.
    • Share Post
    • Have Sawmill, Will Travel
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2006, 09:10:45 AM »
Pats the Man....different location

How's he doing? I haven't seen him since 85. What year did you attend?
Full time custom sawing at the customers site since 1995.  WoodMizer LT40 Super Hyd.

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2006, 05:29:08 PM »
Thanks Ernie,

  I'm sure it looks great.  I have a whole lot of learning to do. 

Stan

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2006, 10:29:29 AM »
Hello everyone,

  Wanted to close the loop on this one.  Thanks for all the adivce.

I hooked up with HarleyRider on this project.  Not cause he rides harleys, but he's been to a logcabin building school and draws some pretty pictures.  MikeD and I are still dancing, but it sounds like he might be too far.  When Joel told me how much dough I would be spending on dimensional lumber I had the excuse I needed to order one of the two mills the Captain has in stock.  Talked a buddy into taking half.  (maybe I should be doing sales)

Question.  We are thinking piers, but I would love to see some nice stone beneath those logs and I have a lot of em. 

Stay tuned. 

Stan

Offline pappy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 902
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Wallagrass,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Grandfatherhood is good !!
    • Share Post
    • Harttwood Rosettes and Plinths
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2006, 09:52:07 AM »
Hi Stan
Quote
We are thinking piers, but I would love to see some nice stone beneath those logs and I have a lot of em.
Quote

This is how we built our log cabin "Outback"... the thread takes you through our construction process...

Ground contact was done with concrete disk around 4 - 6 inch thick w/ two pieces of re-bar embedded in the mud... The "forms" were fabricated from 55 gal plastic barrels cut on the table saw.. I slit the "rings" if you will and used a small piece of steel w/ two holes drilled through it and the ring at the split... I used two 1/4" bolts w/ the steel to hold the "ring" from spreading... After the mud sets you just have to take the nut off of one side to remove the ring...  I place the ring on a 3 X 3 pcs. of plywood and place a piece of ploy inside the ring to keep the water from seeping out... Once the cement cures you can roll the disk around into position... After removing the topsoil where the disk is to be placed add 2 to 3  5 gallon pails of fine gravel and place the dick on top...We used cedar post between the disk and the 6 X 6 sills and set about 18" to 24" off the ground...
     

It works quite well if the top soil is removed.. if you can get a small bulldozer to take off the topsoil where the camp will set would be best then bring in a load of rock and level it...Your drainage sloping can be done at the same time...

Hope this helps and good luck and above all have fun.

Tim

PS Please post some pics of your progress... :)
"And if we live, we shall go again, for the enchantment which falls upon those who have gone into the woodland is never broken."

"Down the Allagash."  by; Henry Withee

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2006, 05:24:57 AM »
Pappy.  thanks for the input.  I  couldnt find the "thread" you were refering to.

Offline thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 31485
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2006, 06:20:15 AM »
Stan,I did a search on Outback and I found it.Look for our "log cabin on the back 40". It's a great thread to bring to the top.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline pappy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 902
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Wallagrass,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Grandfatherhood is good !!
    • Share Post
    • Harttwood Rosettes and Plinths
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2006, 07:38:03 AM »
I  couldnt find the "thread" you were refering to.



Oops, sorry Stan I forgot the link...  ::)

 http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=7671.0
"And if we live, we shall go again, for the enchantment which falls upon those who have gone into the woodland is never broken."

"Down the Allagash."  by; Henry Withee

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2006, 05:23:31 AM »
thank Pappy.  Great pictures!  How long has that taken you?  How did you know how many piers you needed.  We are building a 16x20 hunting camp and were thinking 3 across the side, and at least 3 across the front while making sure the door doesnt sit over the middle support just to be on the safe side. 


Stan

Offline pappy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 902
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Wallagrass,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Grandfatherhood is good !!
    • Share Post
    • Harttwood Rosettes and Plinths
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2006, 07:55:07 AM »
Your welcome Stan and thanks,

We had the cabin deck... support pads, 6X6 sills, 2X6 floor joist, and sub floor done the previous year. That took about a week or so, just the wife and I... I believe from the deck to the chimney it took us something like 5 months working pretty steady at it to being "dried in"... We did get some help as the post of our construction here at the FF shows but Jennie and I built it mostly our selves... There was still a good amount of work to do windows and doors, loft decking, steps up to the loft, chinking, kitchen cabinets, propane lights and stove and the like to do but we have been "in" since Feb of 05. 8)

As far as the piers placement I've used 8 and 10 foot spans w/ 45 degree 2X4 angle braces in the past and it has always worked very well... Where as my doors enter the gable end walls of the cabin I'll place another 6X6X8' sill under the main sill w/ pads and post spaced 6' apart on either side of the door opening (one door this winter starting sticking a bit)... In doing this I hope to rectify problem of the door sticking when the frost does what frost does... :D


 
"And if we live, we shall go again, for the enchantment which falls upon those who have gone into the woodland is never broken."

"Down the Allagash."  by; Henry Withee

Offline Stan P

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
  • Location: Fairfield, CT
  • Gender: Male
  • A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    • Share Post
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2006, 06:52:04 PM »
We have dug out holes for piers, but because we are so close to bedrock, 1-3 feet, we hit granite pretty quick.  It's great we will save on concrete.  Question, what should we do to be certain the cabin doesnt slip off the rock over time?  Is there a way to drive bolts into rock and then pour the concrete?


thanks


Stan

Offline Don P

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8361
  • Location: Southwestern VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Calculator Index
Re: Log Cabin
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2006, 09:02:29 PM »
Hammer drill and rebar?
Our well went 40 feet of casing till it hit the rock. The power pole 30' away is only down about 4' and they hit the bottom of the hole, DanG rock.

We watched 2 choppers running concrete up the mountain yesterday for several hours, glad that's not my bill  :o.
The future is a foreign country, they will do things differently there - Simon Winchester


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

clip
T & G Cabin

Started by sherpa on Timber Framing/Log construction

2 Replies
1456 Views
Last post January 25, 2012, 02:04:21 PM
by reride82
xx
old log cabin

Started by whamo1958 on General Board

23 Replies
1829 Views
Last post March 16, 2014, 09:17:02 PM
by drobertson
xx
The Kid's Cabin

Started by Nate Surveyor on General Woodworking

12 Replies
2663 Views
Last post November 21, 2007, 09:15:08 AM
by asy
xx
log cabin

Started by logman on Timber Framing/Log construction

10 Replies
2352 Views
Last post June 04, 2014, 04:16:31 PM
by Texas Ranger
 


Powered by EzPortal