The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder  (Read 21216 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2076
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2009, 08:56:59 AM »
Hi,

PLease DON'T put used anti freeze in your tires.  Yes it will work fine, but if you rip a valve stem off or somehow puncture a tire you will leave the hazardous stuff all over your yard or wherever.

If you are looking for cheap, I  am considering putting used fryer grease in a garden tractor.  I was thinking it wouldn't weigh as much, but it has been pointed out here you can have too much weight so I might leave some in the sun to liquify it and give it a go.
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 27152
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2009, 10:48:17 AM »
What will the fryer grease be like in your tire when it is a solid blob from cooler weather or downright cold?
Garden tractor is moving slow most of the time, but on a side hill the flop you get might flip the tractor easier, seems to me.

On a tractor at road speeds, one wouldn't want any flop of blob going over the top. That used to happen with fluid loaded tires at high speeds (coasting downhill or gearing a tractor to speeds over say 20 mph).
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline mike_van

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1525
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Kent Ct. USA
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2009, 01:02:26 PM »
I'd re-think the fryer grease unless I was somewhere it never got cold.
I was the smartest 16 year old I ever knew.

Offline WMcGinn

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 26
  • Age: 55
  • Location: Paragould, Arkansas
  • Gender: Male
  • Thar some big ole trees in Californi.
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2009, 08:13:29 PM »
Fryer grease?   I can see coons and dogs attracted to my French fry scented tractor. :o).

I'm sure there is some environmental impact if you dumped 30-40 gallons of WWfluid on the ground...   But as for leaks, essentially every car on the road is squirting this stuff little bits everywhere and I'm sure the epa wouldn't allow it if it was overly toxic.       
Wm
There's plenty of room for all God's creatures...... right next to the Mashed potatoes.

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2076
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #44 on: June 07, 2009, 08:54:25 AM »
Here is my thoughts on the grease.  I run bio diesel and have lots of used grease laying around.  The raw stuff is still pretty liquid at even 0 degrees and I bet if I left it in the sun, strained it and added som anti gel it would be just fine.  The coons and bears have never gone after the white grease totes beside the barn so I dont think they will attack a tractor tire.  I think it is a calculated risk and the garden tractor doesn't see much action in the winter either

And to be clear, Windshield washer fluid is a fine alternative, I was trying to steer anyone away from automotove anti freeze. 

ANother alternative might be the rv anti freeze they use in baseboard heating systems that have any chance of contmainating drinking water, but I dont think that would be any cheaper than wwfluid.  But now that I think of it, I have a 30 gallon barrel in my basement left from a flush some years ago.  Perhaps plumbers could furnish you with used product for cheap.
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline stonebroke

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2003
  • Age: 68
  • Location: warnerville NY
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #45 on: June 07, 2009, 01:01:36 PM »
Calcium chloride is pretty toxic too.

Stonebroke

Offline mike_van

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1525
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Kent Ct. USA
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #46 on: June 07, 2009, 06:17:54 PM »
Calcium chloride is pretty toxic too.

Stonebroke
              How is saltwater toxic? 
I was the smartest 16 year old I ever knew.

Offline stonebroke

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2003
  • Age: 68
  • Location: warnerville NY
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #47 on: June 07, 2009, 08:36:51 PM »
Salt by itself is toxic. You can use it to kill weeds. Calcium Chloride is not sodium chloride anyway.

Stonebroke

Offline shinnlinger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2076
  • Location: Canaan NH
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #48 on: June 07, 2009, 09:30:50 PM »
 a few years ago I was clearing some trees when I ripped a valve stem off.  NOt wanting to change a tractor tire in the woods I B-lined it for the barn, cutting across a field and the lawn.  I made it in time, but you could see my dead path all summer where the chloride hit the ground.

Still, I would take that  over automotive anti-freeze.  If an animal drinks it it can kill.  I might be off my fryer greese kick now and focused on used RV antifreeze.  If the price is right I am on it.
Shinnlinger
Woodshop teacher, pasture raised chicken farmer
34 horse kubota L-2850, Turner Band Mill, '84 F-600,
living in self-built/milled timberframe home

Offline Chico

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
  • Location: NE Ga Orig from LA ( lower Ala)
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #49 on: June 08, 2009, 11:36:08 AM »
sorry wrong post
Chico
My Daughter My sailor MY HERO God Bless all the men and Women fighting for us today If you see one stop and thank them

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5767
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #50 on: August 01, 2021, 11:12:28 AM »
Your JD 4310 is similar weight and HP to my NH TC33D (and probably about the same vintage as well: mine is a 2001). For my use, the choice between tractor and ATV is a tractor, no question. I do know a specialty logger who uses an ATV with a Logrite log arch to get in to areas he can't reach with the tractor (he used to be a horse logger). So it can be done, but you are more limited in the size and amount you can take in one trip.

You definitely want to fill the tires. It helps with traction and stability. Mine was filled with Calcium Chloride when new. It was the only thing available in my area at the time. Rim Guard was just coming out, but no one here had it. If I ever have to replace my tires, or if it springs a leak, Rim Guard is what is going in it next time.

I won't use antifreeze - the stuff is toxic, and unfortunately like candy to dogs and other pets. Even RV antifreeze has problems: it's not "non-toxic", it's just a good bit less toxic than regular antifreeze. (Food grade antifreeze is what is used in in heat exchangers and other systems where a leak might put it in contact with drinking water. That is NOT the same as RV antifreeze.)  As for methanol: many tire shops will not work on tires which they know to have methanol in them, even if diluted with water (and if they due, it's a safe bet their insurance companies would have a cow if they knew about it). See this warning about methanol from Firestone (note, the warning is from about 10 years before Rim Guard came out, so they indicate that Calcium Chloride is preferred, and that glycol based antifreeze is "approved".)

When filling, you want to fill enough to cover the top of the rim when the tire is standing up. You don't want absolutely full, because that is like driving on a rock-solid tire. The lack of flex is hard on you, hard on the tractor, and hard on the tires. You should not fill only half full or less than half. The "slosh factor" when you stop suddenly can cause problems with the tractor lurching.  Keeping the tire filled just above the rim minimizs those problems. It also helps protect the rim from rust (no oxygen in contact with the rim = no rust).

Do set your tires on the widest setting you can live with. Some folks add spacers, if there is little or no adjustment possible otherwise.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5767
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #51 on: August 01, 2021, 12:18:29 PM »
Other tractor related equipment:

In addition to the 3 Pt logging winch, I eventually added a belly pan to protect the underside of the tractor. Adding one was not too expensive for me, since it mounted easily to the backhoe subframe I already had on the tractor. I had a local fab shop do the work, after I had seem some work he did on a larger tractor for a full-time logger. I tore the hydraulic filter for the HST off my tractor when it was 3 days old when a flat rock flipped up in just the wrong way and snapped off the filter and the mounting flange. I figured that was a fluke, happening out in the open field. In the woods, I mostly stayed on prepared trails and used the winch to pull trees out of the woods. However, as the years went on, I found myself in more and more off-trail situations, so finally decided to add the belly pan.

What actually finally prompted me to take the tractor to the fab shop was a branch falling off a tree, bouncing off the ROPS, and grazing my shoulder on its way to the ground. I was not even logging, just out checking the trails. I figured the forest was giving me a warning, so I added some falling object protection above the operator station, and limb risers from the front of the tractor up to that. Since it was in the fab shop anyway, I added the belly pan. (He normally does a completely enclosed operator station and engine guards when he sets up a tractor for forestry use. I decided that for the time being, that was overkill for my needs.)

A few years after that, my wife gave me a quick-attach system for the FEL. (I had cheaped out and went with a pin-on bucket when I bought the tractor.) The first thing I bought was a forestry grapple (Sundown GR40 - similar to a Frostbite and a couple other brands). These are much lighter weight than other grapple designs: the grapple weighs about the same as the bucket it replaces. They are designed specifically for moving logs, and they do very well at that. In addition, the narrow profile when not carrying a log makes it easier to maneuver in the woods

  

A few years later a branch poked through my grill while using the grapple to move some brush. It stopped just short of punching in to my battery and radiator. I knew it was likely to happen at some point, and again I figured I got off with an easy warning. I went back to the fab shop, and he made me a grill guard. I can access whatever I need to under the hood with the guard in place, but it is also easily removable.

    

The tractor kind of has a "Mad Max" look going now.

You may find you want a solid "work in the woods" trailer if you haul a lot of logs. I prefer that to dragging them all the way back to the house. I used a home made one for years, but it ws wide enough that it was a problem at times maneuvering around tight corners. I finally found a used CAM Woodsman dump trailer that is a good match size-wise for my tractor - and at only a little over 4 feet wide - is narrow enough to snake around in the woods. Many were made with a connection to run off of tractor hydraulics. This one has the optional self-contained hydraulics with a pump operated off a deep cycle battery, so I can also use it behind my pickup truck.

  

And then if you really want to go overboard: I bought this forwarding trailer used from someone a few hours down the road from me. I had always wanted one, but could never justify the cost. This one had low hours and was in great shape. It had the hydraulic winch option and self-powered hydraulics. It's too small for someone into commercial logging, and too expensive for typical landowner use, but a perfect fit for my tractor or behind my Tacoma pickup. I still can't justify the cost, but got it anyway (a guy needs to have his toys...)

  

A lot of people underestimate what can be accomplished with a small tractor. I do occasionally wish I had bought the next frame size larger (at the time, that would have been a TC40). However, there are also times I just could not get in to some areas with anything larger. It has worked out well for me, whether back in the days I was just using a couple of lengths of 20' chain to pull out logs, or today with all the extra gizmos and doo-dads.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Online Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5787
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #52 on: August 01, 2021, 12:29:39 PM »
Thanks for that rundown John. Since you picked up that forwarding trailer I have thought many times about sending you a PM to see how it worked out for you, if it saved you time, and how often you used it. One of those is on my drool list, but I can't justify the cost either.  ;D 
 I still keep my eyes open for one hoping to find one in need of some repair. Is your rigged for over the road use? Looks like those are the wrong tires for that.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5767
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #53 on: August 01, 2021, 02:47:13 PM »
Actually, the tires are street legal (Super Swampers). The original owner had them put on when he bought it. He had them add electric brakes, and the stock smooth implement tires did not have enough grip for the brakes to do any good in anything other than ideal conditions. (He had a Kubota tractor similar in size to mine, and was afraid a full load would push him around too much when going down hill. He rigged a cheap automotive brake controller and controlled the trailer brakes using the manual control feature. Since the controller was not weatherproof, he had disconnects to allow easy removal when not in use)

The trailer has no lights, so would not be legal over the road anyway, when pulled by a truck (pulling by a tractor, it's just looked at as another farm implement, so doesn't even raise an eyebrow around here).

Rumor has it that someone has been known to pull it around the back roads in my area behind their truck. 
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5767
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2021, 03:06:12 PM »
As far as how I use it and how much I use it:

For firewood it has changed my workflow. I used to winch logs/trees out from the woods and cut them up right by the side of the trail. Then I would either split them right in to my trailer, or load the rounds and bring them home to split there. I still do some of that, but now some of it gets brought home in 10-12' logs and cut to length there. I can't say that operation saves me much total time, but it is more convenient: I have a supply that I can chip away at as time permits (between rain storms or while waiting for an online business meeting to start.

It's definitely been handy for saw logs. Keepers them cleaner, and I can easily deliver them to my friend with a sawmill.

It's also been very handy when folks in the area have a donation to our WoodBank. I just swing by with the trailer behind my truck and grab it.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Online Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5787
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
    • Woodsman Forest Products
Re: Arch skidder vs 3 point skidder
« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2021, 04:41:14 PM »
Well it sounds like it filled a hole for you in several places. Adding lights is no big deal and the brakes are a big plus. Around here is is not unusual to see a skid steer, tractor, toolcat, and the occasional rubber tracked excavator go down the road either, but leaving our road is tough because there is just too much traffic with no shoulder that you would have to navigate to get anywhere else. Some of us resort to 'midnight runs' to get stuff moved. Which reminds me, my buddy down at the far end of the road has been moving 1 or 2 loads of steel roof trusses from where he bought them at the top of the road from another guy. Every Sunday afternoon/evening he goes by with a load of  50' trusses on a 40' trailer. The load of 60' was really 'interesting to watch' and he got it hung on the turn trying to get it back into his staging area. :D :D :D ;D ;D
 Good luck with that trailer, you got a winner there.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
three point grapple skidder

Started by moosehunter on Forestry and Logging

14 Replies
4263 Views
Last post August 27, 2005, 05:03:12 AM
by mike_van
xx
Grapple skidder arm pivot point?

Started by Satamax on Forestry and Logging

2 Replies
1101 Views
Last post June 22, 2018, 03:27:12 AM
by Satamax
xx
99 748gii dual arch skidder

Started by Tthinc 35 on Forestry and Logging

5 Replies
505 Views
Last post December 02, 2019, 04:35:25 PM
by Tthinc 35
xx
Where to find roller for skidder arch

Started by mjeselskis on Forestry and Logging

11 Replies
3666 Views
Last post June 03, 2011, 07:55:04 PM
by Taylortractornut
 


Powered by EzPortal