The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Workshop First Aid  (Read 965 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline firefighter ontheside

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
  • Age: 47
  • Location: DeSoto MO
  • Gender: Male
  • I like trees.
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2021, 03:58:01 PM »
As Doc said, the goal is stop the bleeding and not just to catch it.  If you apply a bandage and it soaks thru, do not replace it.  Go over the top with more bandaging.  As blood begins to clot in the original bandage it will not soak thru as easily.

With the kinds of injuries we can cause to ourselves with sawmills and wood shops, a tourniquet is a must.  If you search tourniquet you will find many suitable tourniquets with a windlass that you wind which applies pressure.  Practice putting it on with each hand by itself as you may have to do that if you injure an arm or hand.  After you put it on for real due to an injury, do not take it off.  As Doc said, some training is good.  Not every injury needs a tourniquet.  Direct pressure may be all it takes.

Another very useful dressing is known as an Israeli bandage, which can also be had on Amazon.  Its a good dressing that can apply pressure.  As with the tourniquet, some practice is warranted so you will know how to use it if need be.  Learning to use it while you're bleeding would be less than fun.

We teach stop the bleed here at the firehouse.  Its a good program.  
Woodmizer LT15
Kubota Grand L4200
Stihl 025 and MS291
2017 F350 Diesel 4WD
Kawasaki Mule 4010

Offline Texas Ranger

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 7642
  • Age: 80
  • Location: Livingston, Texas, God's Country
  • Gender: Male
  • Texan, by God and by choice.
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2021, 05:30:31 PM »


We teach stop the bleed here at the firehouse.  Its a good program.  
Army said stop the bleeding, protect the wound, and treat for shock till help arrives
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Offline Texas Ranger

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 7642
  • Age: 80
  • Location: Livingston, Texas, God's Country
  • Gender: Male
  • Texan, by God and by choice.
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2021, 05:33:33 PM »
Something often overlooked for sawmill safety equipment is an eyewash station.  I had someone get sawdust in their eye and all we had was bottles of water.  I bought a couple of portable units but found out that the shelf life is only 2-3 years and, fortunately, I haven't needed them.  I am considering eyewash cups that you can use with distilled water the next time.  Hey Doc(s), are those effective?
I keep one of the plastic squirt nasal wash bottles full of a saline solution for eye wash.  Hold eye lids open and squirt with saline.  Helps a bunch.
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Online doc henderson

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7858
  • Age: 61
  • Location: Hutchinson, Ks
  • Gender: Male
  • Evil Prevails when Good Men Standby and Do Nothing
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2021, 05:53:36 PM »
Tom, garden hose is ok, but cold water can be uncomfortable.  if i had to at home i would jump in the shower.  you can use flush syringes if you have access.  they  sell 1 or 2 oz bottle of eye wash.  eyeballs are something that people tend to be skittish about, so a cup that you push on your face may be helpful for some.
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 27074
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2021, 09:14:05 PM »
Too late, already got my finger in the table saw with saw stop.  Cutting chicken coop stands when my glove started to unravel about 8 inches from the blade... glove started to go towards the blade and I pulled so hard that I lifted the table saw up... well it hit my thumb and the blade braked.  Could have been very bad..  Took some bone fragments out.. was able to stop the bleeding with liposomal lecithin (cleaner then quick-clot).  Slow drip of serum but hey, I'm thankful I still have my thumb.  


(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

A good and important rule around saw blades, is to not (like never) wear gloves. 
Sorry to see that injured thumb. 
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline firefighter ontheside

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
  • Age: 47
  • Location: DeSoto MO
  • Gender: Male
  • I like trees.
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2021, 07:26:54 AM »
I never, like ever, wear gloves in my shop.  I'd rather have splinters than get my hand pulled into a saw.
With my sawstop, Its best for my finger to contact the blade instead of a glove.  I've heard of people wearing rubber gloves that fit tight.  That would probably be safe.  Might prevent some splinters, give some extra grip, but not strong enough to pull hand into blade.
Woodmizer LT15
Kubota Grand L4200
Stihl 025 and MS291
2017 F350 Diesel 4WD
Kawasaki Mule 4010

Offline WDH

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 31999
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Perry, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • April 1998 - August 2008
    • Share Post
    • hamsleyhardwood.com
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2021, 09:19:51 AM »
Dont wear gloves when using the jointer.  Just saying for a friend :) :).
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5-111, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline bannerd

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 117
  • Location: Malone, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • Madman
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2021, 11:07:10 AM »
Without the saw stop I can tell you... my hand would be a lot worse.  However it works, it took the blade away and that is what I ended up with.

I thought about it and honestly the most danger was not having a clear head.  I've been doing way more thinking than I normally do and honestly that is the worst thing to have when doing any wood work.

Offline WDH

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 31999
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Perry, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • April 1998 - August 2008
    • Share Post
    • hamsleyhardwood.com
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2021, 02:01:15 PM »
That Sawstop saved you from catastrophic injury. 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5-111, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline kantuckid

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1525
  • Age: 77
  • Location: Eastern KY
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2021, 02:21:33 PM »
Here's a more mundane woodshop tip: Get a hold of one of those first aid kit splinter removers. They are in most all kits. I stole mine from my HS job years back as there were a bunch in the kit anyway. They are a small SS pointed thingy that's ideal for splinter removal. Works better than a needle by far! I keep one taped to a toolbox at all times and another at the house. Pops em right out and will help cut in some on the bad ones!

Another tip- That sticky gauze mesh like they use to hold gauze on an injection site, etc. works great to keep blood off of your woodworking projects and is also useful when sanding on the lathe. I talked the blood donation lady out of some when she asked me what size T-shirt I wanted last donation.

I once toured a nearby cabinet factory and many/most of the workers there were using it if they were sanding. I even saw it in use today in a video of handmade suede slippers showing a hand stitching operation. It's also useful to act as the bandaid  itself when your at work.

 R.e. gloves- I am currently T&G'ing 2x6's and do wear gloves using my router table. The bit throws vicious chips which become ballistic missiles that play havoc with your hands. In fact,  I also wear a sweatshirt as my forearms were a mess! Senior skin doesn't handle impacts so well and arms looked like Id been tortured.
I did see some gloves at HD the other day that will be my next bunch. They are the coated thinnish ones that are black with blue trim.  
Kan=Kansas;tuck=Kentucky;kid=what I'm not

Offline firefighter ontheside

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
  • Age: 47
  • Location: DeSoto MO
  • Gender: Male
  • I like trees.
    • Share Post
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2021, 08:03:33 PM »
I got some splinter removers from @doc henderson at the Pig Roast.  Havent used them yet, but I'm sure I'll get the opportunity soon.
Woodmizer LT15
Kubota Grand L4200
Stihl 025 and MS291
2017 F350 Diesel 4WD
Kawasaki Mule 4010

Offline Dan_Shade

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5681
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
  • Gender: Male
  • I don't want to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • Shade Custom Sawing
Re: Workshop First Aid
« Reply #31 on: October 26, 2021, 09:02:44 PM »
What type are they? I have a bunch of splinter out, they work well. 
Woodmizer LT40HDG25 / Stihl 066 alaskan
lots of dull bands and chains

There's a fine line between turning firewood into beautiful things and beautiful things into firewood.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Host a timberframe workshop?Updated-Changed to log builder workshop

Started by fred in montana on Timber Framing/Log construction

16 Replies
3662 Views
Last post February 02, 2011, 07:52:57 PM
by fred in montana
xx
KU workshop

Started by Jim_Rogers on Timber Framing/Log construction

9 Replies
1490 Views
Last post September 11, 2015, 09:39:39 AM
by Jim_Rogers
xx
NE workshop

Started by Jim_Rogers on Timber Framing/Log construction

15 Replies
2042 Views
Last post September 13, 2015, 01:31:46 AM
by Carpenter
xx
My New Workshop (not really.....)

Started by Phorester on General Woodworking

10 Replies
1829 Views
Last post October 27, 2021, 05:09:04 PM
by Tom King
 


Powered by EzPortal