iDRY Vacuum Kilns

Sponsors:

Watcha Makin'?

Started by Old Greenhorn, May 20, 2022, 07:58:21 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Larry


Lots of parts for a simple chair. I glued up the seat, legs, and substructure this morning. Tomorrow I hope to glue the arm bow with all the spindles.  
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

Brad_bb

@DWyatt Looking forward to seen the final assembly.  Not sure from the pic, they look kinda short?

@Larry  Is that a Windsor chair?  did you scoop out the seat?  Hopefully it won't end up like the ones in the beginning of the movie The Patriot, where they keep collapsing the first time he tries sitting on them, Doh!  Not sure how you made that, it's beyond my abilities right now.  Maybe detailed plans?
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

DWyatt

@Larry , this is my first time doing any sort of waterfall so I'm not sure if I have the best method or if I got real lucky. I crosscut the pieces at 90° first using my miter sled on the table saw. Then tilted the blade 45° and removed the bulk of the waste and finally took a finish pass, removing the final 1/16" or so. The two passes on the 45 are important because there's a lot of stress in this crotch wood. 

@Brad_bb  you are correct, we sit on the floor at my house ffcheesy ffcheesy ffcheesy Actually, i have the legs built and they just need to attach to the tops. The tops only extended approximately 8" down the front and back. 

Magicman

I am no Bench Whisperer and hardly do any woodworking anymore, but I did roll a bench out of my shop this morning.

IMG_5946.JPG
It is Honey Locust with Rite Legs.  The seat is a simple live edge slab and the back is bookmatched cookies.

HoneyLocust.JPG
The slab, cookies, and stretcher, (which I decided to not use) have been air drying for about 6 years, so they should be dry enough to use.

IMG_4932.JPG
This is where the cookies came from.

IMG_4942.JPG
A cookie the day it was sawn.

IMG_4939.JPG
The "water wet" slab.

The finish is nothing but many applications (8-10) of 100% Tung Oil applied sometime weeks apart.  The first application was dark colored and the remainder were clear.

Knothole Sawmill, LLC     '98 Wood-Mizer LT40SuperHydraulic   WM Million BF Club Member   WM Pro Sawyer Network

It's Weird being the Same Age as Old People

Never allow your "need" to make money to exceed your "desire" to provide quality service.....The Magicman

aigheadish

Beautiful MM! 

I have some honey locust (the thorny ones, right?) that my wife is itching for me to take down. One has lost all its bark, one has a pretty good sized rot hole in the bottom, and the others are all dead or dying. Like 4 or 5 of them in a group. Looks like I may have to harvest some of it.
New Holland LB75b, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Husqvarna GTH52XLS, Hammerhead 250, Honda VTX1300 for now and probably for sale (let me know if you are interested!)

Magicman

Honey Locust, although it is not rot resistant, it is beautiful wood.  The honey golden color, to me, has no comparison.

IMG_4937.JPG
The customer sold this one that day for $350 green off of the mill.

IMG_4993.JPG
Another nice one.

IMG_4992.JPG
And then there was fence wire but still a pretty slab.

IMG_4930.JPG
Another picture of the crotch being loaded onto the sawmill.  This is where my book matches came from.

LINK when I sawed it
Knothole Sawmill, LLC     '98 Wood-Mizer LT40SuperHydraulic   WM Million BF Club Member   WM Pro Sawyer Network

It's Weird being the Same Age as Old People

Never allow your "need" to make money to exceed your "desire" to provide quality service.....The Magicman

Larry

A chair was born today.


Still needs minor clean up, sanding and a finish.

Brad, this type of chair is similar to a Windsor but called a stick chair. I lightly saddled the seat more for a good visual impression than anything.

Fine Woodworking magazine showed up in my mailbox this evening and has a article by Christopher Schwarz building a Irish stick chair which is quite similar.
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

tule peak timber

Very nice Larry ! What will you be using for a finish?
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

doc henderson

Nice work Larry as usual, but did you trim the legs on the sawmill?    ffsmiley
Timber king 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor powered by a 12 volt tarp motor

WV Sawmiller

Larry,

  Your chair reminds me of master woodworker Mel Gibson except yours holds together. ffcheesy

https://www.facebook.com/IFC/videos/the-patriot-chair-building-101/10154408271901477/
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2011 4WD F150 Ford Lariat PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Stihl 440 Chainsaw, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once

Larry

Quote from: tule peak timber on June 14, 2024, 05:34:33 AMVery nice Larry ! What will you be using for a finish?
Plan to mix up some Maloof finish for it. Buff it in with a white Scotchbrite.
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

tule peak timber

Yes sir , that is a good system :sunny:
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

RetiredTech

 I'm not in the same class as many others here. But here goes. My wife wanted me to build a house for her outside cat. She calls the cat Mew. I don't know why, but I thought about a hollow walnut stump behind the house. So I cut a section that looked like it would do and cut a flat side for the bottom on the sawmill. The other parts just a plywood bottom and some old pallet slats that I cut into board and batten siding. I think it turned out good, I call it DaMew Hut. My wife likes it but I think Mew is still undecided.







Philippians 4:8

Branson 4520R, EA Wicked Root Grapple, Dirt Dog Pallet Forks
Echo cs-450 & cs-620p , Husqvarna 136, Poulan Pro, and Black Max Chainsaws
Partially built bandsaw mill

Magicman

Put it's food in there and it won't have a choice but to at least visit.  ffcheesy
Knothole Sawmill, LLC     '98 Wood-Mizer LT40SuperHydraulic   WM Million BF Club Member   WM Pro Sawyer Network

It's Weird being the Same Age as Old People

Never allow your "need" to make money to exceed your "desire" to provide quality service.....The Magicman

SwampDonkey

Put it facing south and Mew will be curled up by that door in the cooler season.  Food will entice, like MM suggested. Adding a window might help entice, more light inside. Vertical piece of non yellowing plexi at the back?  :sunny:
"No amount of belief makes something a fact." James Randi

1 Thessalonians 5:21

2020 Polaris Ranger 570 to forward firewood, Husqvarna 555 XT Pro, Stihl FS560 clearing saw and continuously thinning my ground, on the side. Grow them trees. (((o)))

thecfarm

As long as the wife is happy with it.  :wink_2:
What did you use to weatherproof it?
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

RetiredTech

Quote from: thecfarm on June 16, 2024, 08:37:12 AMWhat did you use to weatherproof it?
The off white is left over latex house paint from building my generator shed. I bought a quart of brown latex for the log part. I painted it all white to begin with, but it was just too white. I wanted to trim around the entrance with some light blue I had, but my wife said no because it's a female cat.
Philippians 4:8

Branson 4520R, EA Wicked Root Grapple, Dirt Dog Pallet Forks
Echo cs-450 & cs-620p , Husqvarna 136, Poulan Pro, and Black Max Chainsaws
Partially built bandsaw mill

aigheadish

These dang putters...

I think I mentioned that the putter I made broke, from the shaft to putter head. And, as version 1 it was too light anyway, so I wanted to try again.

However, I'm not sure I wanted to try again, and again, and again, and again...

I had a putter head I was pleased with, after cutting too big a hole for the insert and shaft I have on the previous one. I learned my lesson about cutting the shaft hole just larger than the shaft, then coming in through the bottom with the slightly larger insert hole. I finally got the guts to hog out the bottom (for added weight) and drill out the through hole where the insert would go. Everything went reasonably well until I drilled the larger hole for the insert. It didn't line up very well with the shaft side of the hole (I just thought maybe it's better to start on the underside with the larger hole, drilled to depth, then come in through that side with the smaller drill bit indexed to the center of the larger hole?). Upon running my bolt into the insert I gave it a little too much, thinking the threads on the bolt could thread the wood, but I ended up blowing through a bit of the wood on the top of the head. Oh well, I can sand that out. Next I decided I wanted to bury the insert a bit further into the bottom of the putter head.... and snap, deep crack through the whole thing.

A couple things I'm finding:

- I have a drill press and I'm attempting to drill a nice straight hole, through the putter head, at about 20 degrees. I haven't tried tilting the drill press stage but that may be my next attempt (I did find my stage was about 1.5 degrees out of level, not sure why I hadn't checked that before and it explains a lot of my results!). It feels like I may need to make a jig of some variety to index the putter head so I can get the exact same hole and angle. With the strange shape of the head I'm not positive what kind of jig would work.

- I'm not sure the best way to get these inserts to bite without the hole being too big. I didn't look to see if I have a corresponding tap that is the same size as the insert, that was probably a mistake.

- I, apparently, got really lucky on my first putter attempt. Granted the design was a bit easier, it only took me 2 tries. This second attempt has taken me at least 3, maybe 4.

- I'll probably have to change the material, maybe switching out Bubinga for Maple. I don't know if I have enough Bubinga left, without cracks in it.
New Holland LB75b, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Husqvarna GTH52XLS, Hammerhead 250, Honda VTX1300 for now and probably for sale (let me know if you are interested!)

tule peak timber

A new sprinter with walnut tops and a custom carbon fiber spice rack out the door this morning.
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

rastis

Quote from: tule peak timber on June 19, 2024, 01:42:35 PMA new sprinter with walnut tops and a custom carbon fiber spice rack out the door this morning.
Looks very similar to the tops I did for my friends Sprinter, except his was maple

Andries

Beautiful work from the WOC!
Rob; two questions;
- Is the blond wood juvenile/sapwood reasonably stable for that kind of use? In this glaciated and no-walnut part of the world, I'm always hearing that walnut sapwood is to be avoided.  
- Also, for a inset sink countertop, do you use a high penetration epoxy or finish to seal the endgrain from water?
LT40G25
Ford 545D loader
Stihl chainsaws

tule peak timber

Hi Andries,
I always use some sapwood in various designs to make the heartwood look more dramatic. I've never had an issue with stability.
On an inset sink countertop; I use penetrating epoxy on all surfaces, top, bottom, sides, ends etc. then more epoxy for pore fill, defect fill etc. Then I sand everything right down to the woods surface again and build up coats of Awlcraft or Awlgrip, depending. These are marine topcoats that are some of the best in the industry for water, sun and abrasion resistance. In the case of this Sprinter outfit, I then sanded the Awlcraft and applied a hardwax oil with a 2000 grit soft pad orbital and it comes out looking basically naked, but very well protected.
Attached are some pics of a 200' wall that I sprinkled a lot of sapwood in as part of the design. I love sapwood and pith!
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

Andries

Holy moly, are those walls walnut? Impressive.
There's a few board feet involved in that project!
I love the look of the sapwood too, the contrast and random patterns make those walls look like fine woodwork rather than a synthetic faux wood.

LT40G25
Ford 545D loader
Stihl chainsaws

tule peak timber

Laying up a ridge beam for the shop extension. Clear vertical grain doug fir, defect cut, planed and sized. Sort of a poor man's LSL, sort of....
persistence personified - never let up , never let down

doc henderson

Rob, that looks great.  is that a urethane glue?
Timber king 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor powered by a 12 volt tarp motor

Thank You Sponsors!