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Red elm

Started by Bruno of NH, March 01, 2024, 08:47:58 AM

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chet

One of the Elms I used to see around here was Winged Elm. Been many years since seeing one now.
I am a true TREE HUGGER, if I didnt I would fall out!  chet the RETIRED arborist

doc henderson

Bruno, with all the discussion about species, I do not know how what you have will compare.  We have so much here that people are just happy to have it not go the landfill.  I have never paid for elm.  I have barely ever paid for walnut, as we do not really have a logging industry here.
Timber king 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor powered by a 12 volt tarp motor

Larry

I know just a little about red elm. It is highly sought out by chair makers because of its strength and most of all resistance to splitting. When I get some it moves fast.

A little side note. I had this gadget show up on my PC a few days ago. It's called Microsoft Copilot which is a AI program. I decided to ask it a few questions about elm and in a few seconds got lots of great information. Uses, how to identify, and all kinds of other information that I think is accurate. I spent 15 minutes in the rabbit hole learning. I'm impressed.
 
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

doc henderson

have a friend John RN wanted some years ago to make a yoke and harness parts for oxen he was training.  same reasons.  strong and grain resists splitting.  wanted to make the oval that goes over the head to rest on the shoulder for pulling.

A yoke of oxen harnessed to pull a plow. www.pic2fly.com | Oxen ...
Timber king 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor powered by a 12 volt tarp motor

Don P

I've had a couple of people ask for elm for that use over the years.



This is another, the big horizontal upper gear there is the mortise wheel, it has cast in square mortises that the elm teeth insert into to create replaceable cushioning teeth in the cast iron drive train of a late 1800's gristmill. They are embossed with a makers mark. We found these and more in the dirt under the wheel where these worn out ones had been replaced.


moodnacreek

I dismantled a cattle body off a 1972 f 500 to dispose of it.  Except the plywood [tinned] roof it was all rough sawn hardwood. Most of it was elm. The crossmembers under the floor where hard maple .... creosoted. They had no rot. I would never use maple for that.  In the book 'the wheelwrights shop' elm was used heavily used in wagons and other farm implements. They liked to dry it for 8 or 9 years and store it near their furnace.  I have read of a 3rd type of elm that is rot resistance but no nothing of it. It is in this country.

Don P

Red is the most rot resistant that I know of. Elm was the hubs of hell and many wagons. Around the end of WWI the forest service was asked to find a substitute for Ash as they were afraid the auto industry was going to deplete that supply. Just like with sports equipment in my years on this marble, maple was the next choice.
Quote from: chet on March 02, 2024, 12:07:46 PMOne of the Elms I used to see around here was Winged Elm. Been many years since seeing one now.
As long as we are in common name purgatory ffcheesy , another common name used here for that was Wahoo. Absolutely nobody knows that now. And so it goes.

moodnacreek

Quote from: doc henderson on March 02, 2024, 12:16:42 PMhave a friend John RN wanted some years ago to make a yoke and harness parts for oxen he was training.  same reasons.  strong and grain resists splitting.  wanted to make the oval that goes over the head to rest on the shoulder for pulling.

A yoke of oxen harnessed to pull a plow. www.pic2fly.com | Oxen ...
I was told those 'hoops' where white heart hickory quartered and bent heart out.

moodnacreek

Grandad use to say in his younger days kids chewed the inner bark of slippery elm.  For Don: upstate ironwood is called hatmatack and don't forget pepperidge wood if you think elm is hard to split  ffsmiley

chet

Quote from: Don P on March 02, 2024, 07:04:16 PMRed is the most rot resistant that I know of. Elm was the hubs of hell and many wagons. Around the end of WWI the forest service was asked to find a substitute for Ash as they were afraid the auto industry was going to deplete that supply. Just like with sports equipment in my years on this marble, maple was the next choice.
Quote from: chet on March 02, 2024, 12:07:46 PMOne of the Elms I used to see around here was Winged Elm. Been many years since seeing one now.
As long as we are in common name purgatory ffcheesy , another common name used here for that was Wahoo. Absolutely nobody knows that now. And so it goes.

Yer wrong there Don,  I did know dat.  smiley_smug01   I'll admit, yer da first I heard call it Wahoo.   Pretty obvious why it's called winged elm, but can't fur da life of me figure out why it would be called Wahoo.   ffcheesy
I am a true TREE HUGGER, if I didnt I would fall out!  chet the RETIRED arborist

Wlmedley

My first experience with elm was I cut a couple at my mothers house that were starting to die and decided they might be good for firewood. Tried to split them and maul was constantly stuck.At this time they had just came out with the Monster Maul and I bought the biggest one they had.That did the trick and I split all my wood with it for the next 25 years.Probably why my shoulder hurts so bad today.
Bill Medley WM 126-14hp , Husky372xp ,MF1020 ,Homemade log arch,Yamaha Grizzly 450,GMC2500,Oregon log splitter

Larry

About 25 years ago I got a commission from some civil war reenactors to saw out all the parts for a cannon carriage. Their plan was to build the carriage and have some local Amish make the wheels as they did a lot of that kind of work. The Amish flat out told them no way would they make wheels for a cannon, I guess shooting people is something they don't believe in. The reenactors came back to me for wood for the wheels but the hubs had to be red elm as they said nothing else would work for that much weight.

About that same time I had a old horse drawn cultipacker that I wanted to pull behind my grain drill. The wood bearings were rotten so I replaced them with red elm. Used it for a long time until I bought a new drill.

 

Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

Don P

Quote from: Wlmedley on March 02, 2024, 08:52:24 PMMy first experience with elm was I cut a couple at my mothers house that were starting to die and decided they might be good for firewood. Tried to split them and maul was constantly stuck.At this time they had just came out with the Monster Maul and I bought the biggest one they had.That did the trick and I split all my wood with it for the next 25 years.Probably why my shoulder hurts so bad today.
I've still got mine but the pull starter broke  ffsmiley. I still have their barrel stove as well, I think its been through 5 barrels.

Bruno of NH

I made the deal on the red elm.
May have paid to much.
We will see.
Its very rare to find this in New Hampshire. 
It coming from an old farm on the Connecticut River.  I miss some other good logs from this property. 
Black walnut and hickory .
Lt 40 wide with 38hp gas and command controls , F350 4x4 dump and lot of contracting tools

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