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Author Topic: Building my own old school "setworks"  (Read 1072 times)

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Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2021, 05:17:21 PM »
Yes, I'm using the N/O contact and its held closed by the cam until it falls into the notch. 
I dont have my circuit in front of me, its at my shop, but I recall that unless I had a separate set of contacts for the light, (there is only one "zero" light for all setpoints) that portion of the circuit would make all circuits on the output side of my selector switch common.
Each switch is only active as determined by the selector switch....
In my trade ( hydraulics ) there are always multiple ways to accomplish something. Some better than others, but not all bad. I'm sure electrical circuits are the same. 
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2021, 05:50:49 PM »
OK, I just sketched it out for proof of concept.  It actually make for very simple wiring.

Positive to your selector switch (fused).  Selector switch to each micro switch common lead (7 wires now, 11 before).  Join all NC micro switch leads to the indicator light that goes to ground.  Join all NO micro switch leads to motor control (solid state) power relay positive lead, other lead to ground.  Main (fused) power to (solid state) power relay to motor to ground.

Power goes from battery, to selector switch to micro switch.  If riding on cam, motor runs.  Power back feeding along the NO contact buss goes nowhere else as the selector switch stops the flow.  Micro switch rides the cam and drops into slot.  Power now goes to the NC contact, lights the light and back feed on the NC buss is halted like before.

You just need a power reversing switch (DPDT) after the power relay and a on/off switch (on power relay input) to disable the motor when adjusting to "zero" with your crank (leave power on to selector switch so light can light up).  you would need a momentary switch to bypass the micro switch (selector input to NO buss) to start the up/down process.  There would also need to be a halt switch (NC in the power relay input circuit) at each end of your travel.  The bypass switch would allow you to jog back if set up right.

In use, I would expect to see motor switch off and then crank to zero - light comes on.  Make cut and return.  Set direction switch (probably down), set motor switch to "run" or "enable" and press bypass button.  Motor would start up, light would go out.  Continue until notch - motor stops and light lights up.  The light becomes more of an "on target" indicator.

Hmmm, might have to make one of these for my mill!

John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2021, 10:20:04 PM »
As I mentioned before, I dont have my electrical schematic with me, but next time I'm at my shop Ill make sure and bring it home with me so I can share it with you. You can then look it over and if there is a better way, I'm all ears.
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2021, 10:52:30 PM »
you would need a momentary switch to bypass the micro switch (selector input to NO buss) to start the up/down process.



I plan to use a single shot time delay relay to get around this. It will be set just long enough to allow the micro switch roller to get out of the slot and will automatically reset before the next round of adjustment is needed.
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2021, 05:17:01 PM »
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After much trial and error finally found a cam profile that works. I used a 1/4" ball nosed end mill, .050" deep. 
Also started to add sides and ends.
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2021, 08:35:32 PM »
I never understood 'automatic setworks'  I'm thinking you turn the movement on and a limit switch turns it off. So there is a limit switch for each pre-set or thickness. And an override feature jog around and get to a starting point to do a 'stack' of like thickness boards.   On circle mills this can be on a wheel or a vertical slide. It seems like a electric brake gearmotor would be needed but it could also be hydraulic .  I guess the endcoder/ computer set up is the modern way and that is really beyond me.

Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2021, 09:57:18 PM »
Yes, t
I'm thinking you turn the movement on and a limit switch turns it off. 


Yes, thats what it will do. I manually initiate the saw to go down. It will continue down as long as I hold the switch. When the limit switch is tripped, the motion will stop.
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline Crusarius

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2021, 08:05:20 AM »
Going through an awful lot of work to still have to hold the button. I would want to be able to hit the direction key and walk away. 

Another thing I planned on mine was to put a limit switch on a magnet and be able to place it wherever I want on the mill. That way when I am ready to load the next log I can set the switch to the height I want the head and hit go. Then by the time I get the log loaded the head is at the right position and should take minimal movement to get to my first cut point.

My head takes over 2 minutes from last cut to top of travel so the last feature would be very nice.

Offline fluidpowerpro

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2021, 12:13:34 PM »
Thats not a bad idea. I think for now I'll hold the button. If everything works reliably, it wont be hard to add some latching contacts later.
Change is hard....
Especially when a jar full falls off the top shelf and hits the top of your head!

Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Building my own old school "setworks"
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2021, 12:47:02 PM »
Going through an awful lot of work to still have to hold the button. I would want to be able to hit the direction key and walk away.

Another thing I planned on mine was to put a limit switch on a magnet and be able to place it wherever I want on the mill. That way when I am ready to load the next log I can set the switch to the height I want the head and hit go. Then by the time I get the log loaded the head is at the right position and should take minimal movement to get to my first cut point.

My head takes over 2 minutes from last cut to top of travel so the last feature would be very nice.
That's what time delay relays will do. You can have delay off or delay on and they are adjustable. That 2 min. up down travel time would be unacceptable here.


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