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General Forestry => Timber Framing/Log construction => Topic started by: Jim_Rogers on January 12, 2012, 10:02:33 AM

Title: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 12, 2012, 10:02:33 AM
In August of 2010 I held a workshop here at the sawmill yard to cut joints for a frame for a client.

This landscaper lady has her frame just about completely ready to raise.

We hopefully will raise it on Saturday January 14th starting at 10 am.

It will be an old fashion hand raising with just a gin pole for lifting the plates.

She and her workers have be cutting joints and getting things ready for several weeks lately.

They had just about everything done and asked me to come over and help them with the finishing up by making some long mortises for the curved braces in bent 2.

I did that in December.

This past weekend we continued with some of the pre-raising fit up of the frame.

What we do is fit each timber's tenon into the mortise where it will go when the frame is erected, to insure that it will fit correctly. Before we try that we bore the peg holes in the mortise timber. Then when we have the tenon in the mortise and it fits right we put the drill bit into the hole and turn the bit counter-clockwise to make a point in the tenon. After removing the tenon we offset the point a little to "draw bore" the hole.

This method causes the peg to pull the joint together when you pound it in.

Here is a shot of a wall nailer and it's peg:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF4886.JPG)

Her workers have done the bent fit ups and have that all done.
What I mean is after we test fit each tenon to each mortise, what I call one to one, as it is one timber to one timber, we then put the entire assemble together. A bent is like a giant "H" with braces from the post up to the tie beam.

Her frame has three bents. It is a version of the garden shed from Jack Sobon's book.

Now that the bents have been tested. We've been doing the walls.

The first wall we did was the back wall that will only have two windows, in it.

This came out quite nice.

Here are two shots of the back wall:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF4887.JPG)

Her daughter stood up on the wall at the sill corner and took this picture with my camera.
I then instructed her to just turn a little and take another:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF4888.JPG)

The timber on the left, that my sun glasses are sitting on, is the sill. The timber with the braces going up to it is the plate.

Yesterday, we fit up the other wall.
But at the end of the day it was too dark to take a picture of the completed wall sitting on saw horses and blocks above the foundation area.

Now that the walls have been tested, we know that all the joints are going to go together on raising day.

Next we'll put the sills down onto the granite blocks she has for the foundation.
And drop in the floor joists.

Her decking hasn't been planed and tongue and grooved yet, but should be this coming week.
In order to have a "temporary deck" we're going to put some 1x8 siding on the joists so that we'll have something to stand on while we raise the frame.

After the decking is done, hopefully on Friday if it isn't still raining, we're going to put the bents together and have them ready for Saturday morning.

Her daughter is suppose to bring a camera that will take stills and videos. So hopefully next week I'll have some more to show you.

If you are within driving distance and want to join us on Saturday, just drop me an email and I'll send you the address. It's within 3 miles of my sawmill yard.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 13, 2012, 04:30:54 PM
Well, we took the second wall apart today.

Put the sills down and I left my camera here on my desk. Boy was I pithed.

We dropped in the floor joists and put on some 1by temporary decking.

Then we assembled bent two, and bent three.
After a pizza break, we got bent one ready to go together. The client wanted to wait until we have the crowd there tomorrow to see the final bent go together.

We also put a rafter pair together with a collar beam to be read for the raising.
That was so I could show one of her workers how to do it.
He may do rafter pairs while we are doing something else. Don't know for sure if he'll do that or not.
We'll have a camera person on duty tomorrow taking lots of stills and maybe some videos as well.

More tomorrow.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: dukndog on January 13, 2012, 05:45:20 PM
Get those pics Jim!!!  Can't wait to see the progress and raising!!

DnD
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: canopy on January 13, 2012, 08:00:18 PM
I understand for precision one might wait and scribe the tenon peg holes as described, but why wait to drill the mortises? In fact, it would seem advantageous to drill the mortise peg holes before even making the mortise so there is no wood blow out into the mortise pocket.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Buck on January 13, 2012, 08:12:12 PM
PPPpplease! get the pics...
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: jamesamd on January 13, 2012, 10:51:41 PM
I really wish My Son and I could come and help Jim but work will not allow that to be.I wish You all,a safe and successful raising!

My Son and I had a great time at Your workshop and the experience bonded Us closer together. Meeting a couple FF members as well, was a big plus.Tell Lillabeth, We'll be there in spirit.
Jim
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 17, 2012, 07:51:25 PM
I understand for precision one might wait and scribe the tenon peg holes as described, but why wait to drill the mortises?

Good question, the reason why I do it is that in the past we bored the peg holes at their correct location through the mortise, as we cut them. But the frame took months to finish, maybe even 18 months. During that time the timbers that were first completed continued to dry. During this drying process, I noticed that the peg holes distorted. That is they were not round when we went to drive in the peg.
This caused problems with the pegs. We didn't want to shave the pegs and make them smaller. And we didn't want to try and "re-bore" the holes. So to solve this problem with frames that may take a long time to process, I developed this idea to wait and drill the mortise peg holes when we do the frame fit up.

When we do the frame fit up on timbers that have aged some, the fresh holes work out great and there isn't any problems with the pegs fitting.

Also, the peg holes may not distort, it may depend on the type of wood being used.
This is just something I do to make it work for me.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 17, 2012, 08:26:50 PM
Today, I received some pictures and videos that the host's daughter took during the raising.

Over four hours she took 500 pictures and 9 videos.
Some were short videos only a minute or two some were longer.

There were lots of the people there that she knew and not of the actual raising event.
I may go through the pile and move out the ones that show the people and not the raising itself and see how many are left.

I'll start an album of pictures for understand raising process. But I can't do alot at any one time.
I'll try and add some everyday for a while and then we can discuss them.

Here is the first one:
(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08541.JPG)

This is a shot of me giving some information about how we pre-fit up the two bents that are all ready to stand up, just off camera to the camera person's right.

Here is the last photo of the group with the frame up.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09033.jpg)

And here is a nice shot of the frame similar to the frame drawing:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09041.JPG)

Here is the drawing:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/Drawing_of_frame.JPG)

I think it looks pretty much like it should.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 07:31:14 AM
Here is a shot of the three bents.
Bent #1 is not assembled but the tie beam is on the pony saw horses ready to go together and have the tenons poked to then draw bore the holes.
To the right of that is bent #2 which is assembled and nearly in the correct position to raise.
To the right of that is bent #3 which is assembled and on horses outside the frame.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08542.JPG)

Next we see that half of the bent is assembled:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08544.JPG)

During the assembly of the bent it was necessary to have it stationary.
One way to do that is to secure it with some "Butt clamps":

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08550.JPG)

The men in the middle may look like they're taking a break and drinking coffee, but they are both doing something very important.
They are sitting on the tie beam holding it still.
The fellow in the red plaid hat is a Forestry Forum member who drove over to help out and we thank him for doing so.

Behind her brother, you can see the bent all assembled and ready to be lifted up.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08560.JPG)

At the ends of the sills where the bent will stand are some "kickers" which are 2x6 planks timberlok screwed onto the sills and braced with a diagonal so that when the bent is being raised the foot of the post won't slide off the sill and this works very well to do that.

I hope you enjoyed this installment.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 07:47:40 AM
Next we see me demonstrating how a board will be used as a temporary brace to hold the bent vertical until the plates are put on.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08574.JPG)

We use duplex nails so that they can be easily removed when we want to take the temporary brace down.

Now we see that the rope to help pull the bent up is attached.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08577.jpg)

Also, a rope is attached so that the bent can be held vertical and not pushed completely over. It's kind of a safety line.
The two young men in the foreground are the sons of the man in the background. They drove down from NH to help us raise the frame. And we thank them for that.

Here I am holding a "push stick" that we use when the tie beam gets up and over our heads. We cut several and they were both 4' and 6' in lengths.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08578.JPG)

This next shot:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08580.JPG)

Shows us sliding the bent over and back to get it in line with the pockets on the sills.

Bent #1 Up

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08582.JPG)

Here you can see that bent #1 has been raised.

The men are holding the ropes to hold it still, the safety rope is being held as well.
And the push sticks are in use.
The temporary brace is being attached to both sides of the bent at the same time by two men with claw hammers and boards that have had the nails pre-started and ready.

More later.

Jim Rogers   
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Thehardway on January 18, 2012, 09:02:16 AM
Wow, I now know that my calling in life was to be a butt clamp!  I can do that job real well and find it very rewarding, especially with a bologna sandwich and a jug of sweet tea. ;D  Great job Jim.  It looks great but more importantly it will serve the owner(s) well for centuries to come.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: piller on January 18, 2012, 04:32:18 PM
Nice Job!  Enjoyed the pictures.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Bill Gaiche on January 18, 2012, 08:15:59 PM
Really nice Jim. Thanks for sharing. bg
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: dukndog on January 18, 2012, 09:02:09 PM
Great job Jim. Thanks much for the pics. Looks a bit cold there on the raising!!
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 09:16:15 PM
Great job Jim. Thanks much for the pics. Looks a bit cold there on the raising!!

Yes, it was a bit chilly that day. High temp was 27 F

Thanks for your comments.

More to come.....

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 10:28:10 PM
I really wish My Son and I could come and help Jim but work will not allow that to be.I wish You all,a safe and successful raising!

My Son and I had a great time at Your workshop and the experience bonded Us closer together. Meeting a couple FF members as well, was a big plus.Tell Lillabeth, We'll be there in spirit.
Jim

Here is a shot of jamesamd and his son at the workshop in August of 2010:

 (https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC00028.JPG)

His son was always ready with a quick funny saying or something like this:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09987.JPG)

And sometimes he'd catch me off guard and I'd "say what?:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC00032.JPG)

But they did nice work and their joints all went together.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC00057.JPG)

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 10:40:02 PM
Ok, so where did we leave off?

I know bent #1 was up and braced off, after checking for plumb:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08588.JPG)

Next, some kickers were installed next to bent #2 post foot locations and the ropes were again attached to the tie beam.
Also, to prevent a trip hazard the diagonals of bent #1 kickers were removed.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08602.JPG)

Now that the bent was ready it was positioned for the lift:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08603.JPG)

Once up it was braced off as well:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08605.JPG)

More to come,

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 18, 2012, 10:59:43 PM
As with all plans, something sometimes gets forgotten.

I forgot to put in the back wall nailer before we raised up bent #2.

So we had to lean it out to slip the nailer in:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08613.JPG)

Once it was in place we pegged it off:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08621.JPG)

And we added a temporary brace anyway:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08623.JPG)

You can see the "kicker" at the bottom of the post on bent #2.
This was moved down to the next bent. There was one for each side.

The next back wall nailer was remembered and installed:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08629.JPG)

And we had to make a "support ladder" for the front wall as it had two nailers. One below the window and one above it.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08644.JPG)

A couple of boards or planks are used to construct a temporary support to hold these nailers up.
The small boards that go from one vertical support board to the other are like "rungs" of a ladder.
So that's how this support system got it's name.

The rungs are attached 3/4" or 1" lower then the actual finish height of the nailer, so it just hangs down a little.
Then when the bent is stood up, the nailer is lifted up just a little to slide into it's mortise.
If the rung was at the correct height and the nailer was by accident too high then we'd have to fight to get the nails pulled out while the bent was leaning. Not a safe thing to do.

We have used these "support ladders" many times. After the bent was up we just pulled the duplex nails from the rung boards and disassembled the ladder.

Here is bent three up:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08653.JPG)

You can see the support ladder in the background, with the two nailers going through the middle of it.

Next we get ready to lift the plates up and on top of the post's top tenons.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 19, 2012, 09:13:18 PM
As mentioned the next step was to set up the gin pole.

We constructed the gin pole a few years ago, and have used it to raise the plates on several timber frames since we made it.

The pole is just a 6x6 and I think it's 16' long.

 (https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2028.JPG)

This is a picture of it when it was new back then.
You can see I put a threaded rod through the pole about a foot down from the top, for the chain to go around that holds the hook from the top block.

The bottom has a tenon on it to go into another 6x6 and we added braces to help make it stable, from side to side.
Others here on the forum have constructed their own gin pole from these pictures and it is something that is easy to use.

Here is a shot of the bottom:

 (https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2029.JPG)

Basically it's a giant upside down "T" with braces. The braces help make it stable from left to right, and with all that weight it makes the bottom end heavy, and wide for pressing down onto whatever you set it on. Usually we set it on the decking of the frame so we know it's solid and supported.

I was advised, years ago, to not lean it over more then 20 from vertical. This keeps everything safe and not overloaded.

In order to figure this out, that is the 20 lean, I drew the gin pole and put it into my frame model in my drawing program. I placed it onto the deck and leaned it over 20 and arranged it so that the pick point (the threaded rod at the top) was directly over the tenons on the three posts. That was so that the plate would lower down onto the tenons directly without any swinging it out or in to line it up.

Here is a shot of the drawing:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/Gin_Pole_with_plates.jpg)

Being that this is a very accurate drawing program, I could then measure the distance from the post to the gin pole base and see that to be leaned over at a 20 angle that the base had to be 5' 6" off the post.
Using this measurement it is easy to setup your gin pole in the correct spot and when it leans over the tenons it at the right angle.

Before we raise the pole we put on all the rigging.

The top gets a chain for the hook on the block:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2032.JPG)

The the block and tackle set up is laid out:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2031.JPG)

The stationary block is put at the top, the moving block is put at the bottom to be attached to the plates we will raise.

Once the entire setup is attached it is secured to the pole so we can pick up the pole and move it into position:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2047.JPG)

Above is the bottom of the pole ready.

Here is a shot of the top:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2048.JPG)

When the pole is up and leaned over with the back line and two guide lines tied off it would look like this at the top:

 (https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2049.JPG)

To redirect the pull line to a horizontal position we use another block at the base of the pole. To insure that the gin pole base can't slide on the deck we put a chain around the pole and the nearest post.
This chain also works to hold the "re-direction" block, as shown here:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSCF2050.JPG)

After the pole is raised the plate is set onto some saw horses to make it easier to attach the lift line and block to it.

At this raising all this work was done, but the crowd of helpers were mostly in the way and the view of us doing this "set up" work was blocked by these people, so not all of this work got photographed.

More later.

Jim Rogers



Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 20, 2012, 09:07:01 PM
Before we could raise the gin pole we needed some temporary decking put up where the loft will be.
The day before the raising, I brought over, on my trailer, some 2x14x16' an 2x16x16' planks, enough to go fully across the tie beam to create the second floor decking.
We slid some of these up over the end tie beam:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08681.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08682.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08683.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08684.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08685.JPG)

Now that we have something for men to stand on we can raise the gin pole.

more to come

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 20, 2012, 09:15:54 PM
The gin pole has all it's rigging on it:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08720.jpg)

And now the crew is ready to put it up.

To understand how it was going to go, I stood where they would move it to and showed them how it would slide between the temporary decking through the doorway in the frame wall:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08732.JPG)

It is important that all who were going to carry the gin pole understood where it was going to be moved to.

Here is a shot of the crew ready to pick up the gin pole while others pulled out the saw horse holding it while it was rigged up.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08733.jpg)

Here is a shot of it up next to the north wall:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08735.JPG)

After the base was placed where it should be, with the pole slid over against the middle tie beam, the back line and two side guide lines were secured to the post bases of the three bents already standing:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08751.JPG)

We often use the frame itself for the points to tie off the lines. It is easy to do and doesn't require any fancy anchors. With the "T" base we probably could do without the side guide lines but I would rather be safe then sorry.

More later.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 20, 2012, 09:29:53 PM
With the gin pole up and ready, the plate was brought in and put onto a pair of saw horses so that we could attach the lift line to it and then the hook from the block and tackle.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08756.jpg)

Before we could lift the plate up we had to get the braces in place that go from the post to the plate, and the door posts and header into position:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08760.JPG)

Sometime, or most times we put a coin under a post in the mortise in the sill. We usually try and put a coin in that has the year that the frame was raised. We looked through several of the crew's pockets, including my own and we couldn't find a 2012 coin. We didn't know if they have even issued any yet. We found a nickel from 2010 and that was the year of the first workshop when we started this frame so we decided to use that coin.
We put it under the door post:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08762.JPG)

The two door post were installed and the header was pegged off:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08770.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08774.JPG)

Everything seems to be ready now.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 20, 2012, 09:47:25 PM
Now everything seems to be ready:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08779.JPG)

The crew has picked up the pull line, and are standing by and ready:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08782.JPG)

The plate was raised and lowered down onto the post tenons.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08793.JPG)

Now due to the fact that the gin pole can't be exactly in the middle as the bent is there, usually the plate hangs a little bit off balance and low on one end.
This end is the first end we put the first post tenon into. Then we move down the plate lining up and sliding the tenons into the plate, working from one end to the other.

As the plate is being lowered down by the block and tackle, and sometimes an added hit with a commander, the tenons are aligned with their mortises:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08822.JPG)

We had a little trouble with the plate getting it in line with all the bent post tenons, and had to put a "tag" line on one end to help pull it into line.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08832.JPG)

Once this was done the plate dropped right on.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: VictorH on January 21, 2012, 12:17:23 AM
Jim,  Thank you for taking the time to share this.  I am really enjoying each segment and am learning a few things!

Victor
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: John S on January 21, 2012, 11:34:13 AM
Jim, thanks also for the time and effort you have put into this post and the forum in general.  You are educating a lot of people, especially me.
John Snyder
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 21, 2012, 01:31:43 PM
Thanks for your comments, Victor, and John.

After the tenons were in line and down onto the post some we pegged them off:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08841.JPG)

Remember to always site through the peg hole before putting in a peg. If the hole hasn't been bored through then don't drive in the peg, you'll blow out the back side of the mortise. This is one of those things that they say "don't ask me how I know...."

Once one corner post was pegged we pound down the other corner post and this pulled all the middle joints down and they were pegged off:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08852.jpg)

After that side was done, it was time to do the other side.
To do that you disconnect your back line, side guide lines, and chain and stand the gin pole straight up.
Once it's vertical, you rotate it around 180 so that you can lean it over the other side and do the same thing again.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08867.JPG)

We found it was easier to lift the loop in the side guide line and back line up off the top of the gin pole to re-thread the lines down through the decking gaps to the posts on the door wall.
This was easier then handing all the line up and over the tie beam.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08871.JPG)

Once the gin pole was in place and tied off with the back line and two side lines and chain we lowered the lifting block down to the second plate which was placed on saw horses next to the wall:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08888.jpg)

The lift line was attached to the second plate as well as a "tag" line to hold onto the plate so that it wouldn't move out of line or hit the pegs as it was raised. I think we used two tag lines one on each end of the plate.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08893.JPG)

More to come.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 21, 2012, 01:44:56 PM
After the second plate was ready, we had to get the two braces that go from the posts to the plate in place:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08896.jpg)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08898.jpg)

And:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08907.jpg)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08908.jpg)

When we ready these braces we don't drive the pegs way in. We drive them just enough to catch the back side of the mortise. This leaves the brace a little loose so we can move it as little as we need to when the plate is being lowered down onto the tenons.

Every man on the loft decking has to have at least one peg in tool belt or pocket to be ready when we need them:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08915.JPG)

This side went much smoother then the other side:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08920.JPG)

More later.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 22, 2012, 11:51:36 PM
Now that we are done with the gin pole it's time to take it down. The pole is again stood straight up and the lines are untied. The chain is released and the lift block is lowered and tied off to the pole as it was when it was first set up.

Then the pole is passed down:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08926.JPG)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08927.jpg)

It is set back onto two saw horses, so that the rigging can be removed and it can be disassembled for storage until the next time we need it:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08932.jpg)

Shortly thereafter the rest of the temporary decking is lifted up and placed onto the tie beams so that the loft area is now full from plate to plate so that the crew can use it to stand on and erect the rafter pairs.

While we were waiting for the rafter crew to assemble the pairs and brace them off with a temporary collar beam/board, I instructed the second floor crew to add some safety "kickers" to the ends of the plates. These are just some 1by boards duplex nailed onto the ends of the plates and down the post a little to prevent the end rafter pairs from falling off the ends of the plate:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08937.JPG)

Then the first rafter pair was lifted up on one gable end:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08948.JPG)

After the pair was set into their step lap rafter seats the level was handed up and the pair was made plumb. To secure the rafter to the plates we used some 6" Timberlok screws, 2 each side. To hold the rafter pair plumb we put a 1by board from the rafter pair down to the plate on a diagonal angle, again with duplex nails.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08949.JPG)

More to come.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 23, 2012, 12:10:37 AM
Here the loft crew is attaching the diagonal board to the rafter pair:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08950.JPG)

And to make sure it is strong enough we put one on each side:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08956.JPG)

The next rafter pair is ready:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08962.JPG)

And:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08964.JPG)

After the second pair is set down into it's seat on the plate, another brace board is attached to the underside of the rafter pairs. It was suggested to me that these be put on the underside instead of the top side where I usually put them so that they would be out of the way of the roof decking. They can easily be removed after the roof decking is started. I can learn something new as well.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08967.JPG)

The rafter crew is busy getting more pairs ready, down at the other end of the yard:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08970.JPG)

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 23, 2012, 12:30:24 AM
The distance from one pair to the next at the seat, in the plate, should match at the ridge if the pair is plumb:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08975.JPG)

Here several pairs have been erected:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08994.JPG)

Another pair is raised:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC08997.JPG)

The crew is busy carrying finished pairs as other continue to put them together. Team work for sure.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09003.JPG)

Bracing off:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09006.JPG)

The last pair, the other gable end, is set:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09010.JPG)

This side is looking good:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09013.JPG)

They are checking for plumb and all is good on this side:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09016.JPG)

The last timberlok is driven home:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09021.JPG)

And the whole crew is assembled, below.

Our host tops off the frame with a green bow at the ridge:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09031.JPG)

And the happy crew has their picture taken:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC09033.jpg)

Basically "The End"

Jim Rogers

PS. Total time from beginning to end "four hours".........
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 23, 2012, 01:05:16 AM
I have two additional stories to tell about a raising.

One is at the beginning and one is at the end.

The beginning story is when everyone who is going to help on the raising is there we play what I call, the "name game".

How this works is that everyone stands in a circle. Our circle had 19 people in it.

I start the game.

I say my name. Then the guy standing to my left says, he is Jim, my name is Dan. Then the guy next to him says, his name is Jim, his name is Dan, my name is Dave. This continues around the circle until it get to the last person who is stand to my right. If we have two people with the same name then we add something like Mr. Mike to the second Mike or Dave P to the second Dave, or we call him David. Something like that.

Now after we have been around the circle once and everyone knows everyone's name, we switch sides and make sure we don't stand next to the same person again, on either side. We start with me and we go around the circle again, every calls out everyone's name one at a time.

By the time we have done it twice, which in this case took almost 15 minutes, everyone know everyone's name, for sure.

This does a lot of things. First everyone is introduced to everyone.

We don't have to yell out, "hey you, look out!!!!" We all know his name, and we can shout "hey, DAN, look out......!"

This helps a lot when you need to tell someone to "look out"....

Also, with everyone being on the same page, we are now a team. And we work as a team to get the job done. It builds team work.

This group of 19 was one of the biggest groups I have seen this name game done with. But I know of others who have done it with 25 or more. It works and when you have a raising do it and it will make the job go much smoother.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/Name_game.jpg)

The name game......

The second story is the story of the "topping off " of the frame. Usually the green bow used to top off the frame is of a branch of a tree of the same type of wood that the frame was made out of.

And it is usually done by the host or owner of the frame. But sometimes others do it. I'm sure some others on this forum have some other reasons why or who should do it. And maybe they'll share them with us as well.

We usually say something nice at the time we pound in the nail holding up the green branch/bow.

I usually suggest that they "thank the mother nature" for the wood to make the shelter. And to "thank the old masters" for teaching us the craft of timber framing. And to "thank the creator" for the ability to learn this craft and to pass it on to others.

Also, to say, "Bless this frame, and all who worked on it, and all who enter it, forever and ever."

These are just some of the things I like to say at the end of a fine day of raising a frame.

I hoped you enjoy this story and feel free to ask questions about it.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: oklalogdog on January 23, 2012, 06:40:14 PM
Good job Jim.  I can learn much form you and these photos.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: scouter Joe on January 23, 2012, 07:41:57 PM
Thanks for the effort to tell us the story of this raising and all the pictures . Nothing like a raising to bring out community and team work . Thanks again scouter Joe
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: canopy on January 23, 2012, 08:54:05 PM
Great read and even exciting due to all the photos. That's interesting the rafter pairs with collars went up by hand rather than gin pole. I could see those weighing many hundreds of pounds each.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: dukndog on January 23, 2012, 10:24:33 PM
I say great story and pics Jim!! Thanks for sharing, and I think I will try that "Name Game" soon!!
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on January 25, 2012, 11:07:22 AM
That's interesting the rafter pairs with collars went up by hand rather than gin pole. I could see those weighing many hundreds of pounds each.

When you are planning a raising, you have to take the load of the timber into consideration in order to figure out what equipment you're going to need.

These rafters were 4x6x 9'4" which figures, at green weight, of 54.5 lbs each. They were over 18 months old so less then "green weight".
The collar beam is a 4x6x7'8", at green weight, of 45 lbs.  So the total when new was 154 lbs. Again as they have aged some we could round it off to 150 lbs for a pair of rafters with a collar beam attached.
The rafter pairs that have only a 1by board for a temporary collar beam weigh even less.

At a timber framing school, I was taught that each person, can on average, pick up 50 lbs without straining themselves. So it would mean that three people can easily carry and lift these rafter pairs with a collar beam no problem.

In the past when we did a larger frame we would past the rafters up and put them together on the frame.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DCP_3593.JPG)

This is what we do.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DCP_3594.JPG)

Also, in raising a bent we figure the load of the bent.
In the picture I want to show you, you'll see the bent being raised at the workshop where the first bent of this frame was cut.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/DSC00047.JPG)

This bent consists of two 8x8x 10'8" post, each weighing 166 lbs each. A tie beam weighing about the same 166 lbs. Two braces 4x6x50" weighing  24 lbs each and a nailer which is a 4x4x10'8" which weighs about 42 lbs. Total weight of the bent is about 588 lbs.
Now we aren't completely lifting this bent up. We're standing it up from the top of some saw horses with the feet of the post resting on the sills.
They taught me that this means 2/3 of the weight of the bent are at the feet and not being lifted. Which means the lift is 588 / 3 = 196 lbs. Divide that by 50 lbs per person and you will need at least 4 people to raise the bent. The picture will show you we did it easily with 6.

When you have heavy timbers you have to figure your loads and then decide on where or not if you'll hire a crane or build and use a gin pole.

Before we made the gin pole we put sheds together by just passing the plate up onto the deck and then have the second floor crew just lift it up and set it on the post tenons. This can be done completely by hand. But you need many hands to do it.

And we'd put the rafter pairs together up on the frame second floor deck. We'd put a plank over the plates to use like a table or saw horse. Then we'd put the feet of the rafter near where they will set into the plate. And then assemble the pair of rafters. (Again I have pictures of this see above). After the pair is assembled we just roll them into place.

Good question and thanks for asking.

Jim Rogers

 
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: reride82 on January 25, 2012, 02:00:22 PM
Jim,

Thanks for the very thorough and diligent walk through you always do on your projects . I really enjoy reading about your projects and the advice you give to others on this forum. I didn't know about timber framing before this forum, and now would like to try it in the future. I'm sure I'll have questions  :P

Levi
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: FRANKZ on March 06, 2012, 02:01:40 PM
I have a question about the rafter spacing, and collars ties, on the building you raised in this thread.  I am assuming that the building is the 12' x 16' "Sobon Shed.  In the photos it appears that the roof rafter spacing is on 4 foot  centers rather that the two foot spacing recommended by Sobon.  Also there appears to be additional collars ties in your shed.  In his book Sobon acknowledges that his shed is overbuilt so is the 2 foot rafter spacing necessary?  Are extra collars ties beneficial?  I am in central Maine so snow load is a concern.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on March 06, 2012, 02:29:49 PM
Frank:
I have had several discussions with Jack on this subject.
When you're going to use 2" tongue and groove for the roof decking it can span the 4', I am told.
If you're going to do 1" boards and not tongue and groove then you need to do 2' spacing as the boards can't span the 4' distance.

Your location my require a different spacing and that would be based on your actual snow load for your area.

The collar ties you see in the frame are special. First of all there is usually two. One on each gable end for the siding to nail to.
In her case she wanted a functioning beam to lift loads up the back side of the building on the rear or right hand gable end.

A drawing of this look like this:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/beam_over_door-sm.JPG)

And the frame work would look like this:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10095/Beam_over_door_framework.JPG)

You can see to support the lifting beam there is two 4x4 posts on either side of the door. They sit on the tie beam, which is well supported and if it sags we can always put in a center support post under it from inside later on.

That supports the end collar beam for the light loads she'll be lifting with her block and tackle; up to swing into the loft deck through the small loft doorway.
This lifting beam would want to see-saw from the load. In order to hold the interior end down, I put another collar beam in, at the top of the lifting beam.
That means for this lifting beam to rotate on the gable end collar beam, it will have to raise the next rafter pair up, including the roof decking. I think the rope would break before that would happen.

Each rafter pair was screwed down to the plate with two timberlok screws on each tail down into the plate and each screw has high shear value. Equal to a 3/8" lag bolt.

I hope this has helped you to understand the roof system shown in the above pictures.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: addicted on March 06, 2012, 03:22:17 PM
This is a great lesson Jim
 You wouldn't happen to have a good reference for gin poles would you? I saw the guild sells a rigging book, but I was unable to tell wether it covered gin poles. The reviews I found on the book talk mostly of knots. If you or anyone else have any advice on books covering gin poles it would be greatly appreciated. Also the block and takle you use looks alot like the campbell double sheave block. Do you like them? What is the working load limit and have you come close to lifting that amount with them?
Thanks for your help
Rusty
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Jim_Rogers on March 06, 2012, 03:37:42 PM
Rusty:
I have written and posted a lot of gin pole stuff here on the forum.
Including I think the label off of my blocks.
Please do a search and see what you can find, first.

I don't know of any books on gin poles but I do have some shots I scanned in out of other books.
I can't however post any of them due to copyright stuff.
So you'll have to read what I posted first.

Then if you have any more specific questions ask again in a new thread. And if I don't know the answer, I'll try and find it out for you.

Jim Rogers
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: FRANKZ on March 06, 2012, 07:08:06 PM
Jim,  Thanks so much for your courteous and thorough answer.  I especially appreciate the drawings.  I plan to install a metal roof, with 1x material perpendicular to the rafters, so I will go with the 2 foot spacing, and install the two collars ties at the end of each gable.
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: addicted on March 06, 2012, 09:49:23 PM
Thanks Jim
  I think I found most of your threads on gin poles. Great stuff. 
Thanks Rusty
Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: Brian_Weekley on March 06, 2012, 11:23:37 PM
Here's another great online reference--the military manual for rigging.  Loaded with all kinds of info:  covers ropes, knots, slings, pullleys, jin poles, reference tables, etc...

http://www.petrospec-technologies.com/Herkommer/knots/FM5-125.pdf

Title: Re: Pre-raising frame fit up story & raising story
Post by: addicted on March 07, 2012, 08:21:09 AM
Thanks Brian
that's a great resource.
Rusty