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Author Topic: Need some help beam milling  (Read 436 times)

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Offline Colin52

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Need some help beam milling
« on: April 20, 2021, 08:45:50 PM »
I have a Haddon lumbermaker and husky 365 that's doing well, but thereís a few things Iím hoping someone has tips to improve.  I am a bit frustrated with nailing and remailing the board to logs(the nail either bends or comes through the board when I try to pry it or the board off), screws are hard to deal with because the head fills with sawdust.  I was thinking of some kind of clamping option for the board.  

I can do pretty well freehand if I have a line to follow, but a chalkline doesn't seem to mark well on bark, and if I drawknife a line it's wet and slippery and doesn't hold a mark well.  I was tempted to get a grease pencil but it also seems hard to follow a line because the sawdust covers it.  

Held at the right angle, the regular chain I'm using works quite well, but I asked the local husky dealer if they had ripping chain in stock, and they said they did and sold me something called "super rapid" Stihl chain.  Iím trying to figure out now just what I bought and how to sharpen it, because there's some flatness involved.  Trying to get my phone to cooperate so I can link a photo from a gallery I havenít figured out yet.

Anyways, with the lead times on sawmills and being able to cut in place, I'm liking this type of milling well enough.  I'm not at all sure this super rapid chain is a ripping chain, but all the advertising is about how aggressive and kickback prone it is, so it sounds dangerous and powerful.  I'm interested to report back how this chain performs compared to a standard husky chain.  I'll have to take a likely log, probably will be hickory or white oak, and compare the time it takes to rip down each end with the different chains.  I don't know enough to know if there is any change in "resistance" when sawing towards the former top and bottom of the tree or if it would be enough to throw off the results.  I haven't tried it but I would have to reattach the lumbermaker anyway so it should be possible to run up the log in the same direction, only the saw would be hanging out in space rather than over the board.  

Thanks in advance for your advice and tips!

Iíll add that Iím often working in one of my little valley's where I don't have signal, but I'll be back to read and reply whenever I can.  Thank you,

Colin

Offline Nebraska

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2021, 10:30:22 PM »
When I use my lumber maker I use screws to attach the the guide board to the log. Pre drill the holes if need be.  It's one of the reasons I own a sawmill. It works but it's slow.  

Offline Colin52

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2021, 01:54:18 AM »
Thank you. Do you find you have to do anything special to make that work?  Iím using regular decking screws, e and a half inch, original plan was to use my brace and bit to put them in, sans power where I'm at, but the head got clogged and was very hard to clean the sawdust out of the socket for the driver bit.  Tried the one with the octagonal as well as Phillips.  Then went and got an impact driver when they were tough to remove, but that just stripped it and it wouldn't budge.  I'm not sure why that's being so tough because it seems like the natural thing to do.  

Offline Colin52

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2021, 01:56:10 AM »
I almost got the sawmill, and if it weren't for the three month lead times and the terrain, as well as lack of atv I would have probably done it.

Offline Don P

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2021, 07:19:41 AM »
For recessed head screws and allens I twiddle a piece of wire around inside the recess and blow it out before sticking the driver tip in. Seems fussy but is quicker than dealing with a stripped head.
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Offline Colin52

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2021, 03:11:20 PM »
For recessed head screws and allens I twiddle a piece of wire around inside the recess and blow it out before sticking the driver tip in. Seems fussy but is quicker than dealing with a stripped head.
I'll try the wire thanks!

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2021, 03:45:48 PM »
if necessary, switch to hex head lag bolts and predrill your guide board and lag holes with a battery drill.  keep a ratchet and socket.  obviously the guide board will need registers bored by forstner or spade bit to flush the heads below grade.  


any chain will cut quicker if passing the log at an angle to noodle it slightly with the grain.  its hard work no matter how you chainsaw your boards out. give that saw lots of idle breaks to blow the heat out, and be sure youre running it full throttle.  these carbs dont meter well at part throttle.  i would run more than 50:1 ratio on the oil too. 
Psalm 37:16

Offline Colin52

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Re: Need some help beam milling
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2021, 04:00:03 PM »
if necessary, switch to hex head lag bolts and predrill your guide board and lag holes with a battery drill.  keep a ratchet and socket.  obviously the guide board will need registers bored by forstner or spade bit to flush the heads below grade.  


any chain will cut quicker if passing the log at an angle to noodle it slightly with the grain.  its hard work no matter how you chainsaw your boards out. give that saw lots of idle breaks to blow the heat out, and be sure youre running it full throttle.  these carbs dont meter well at part throttle.  i would run more than 50:1 ratio on the oil too.
Thanks, I'll do that.  I've been resting it every once in a bit while cutting, but haven't figured out how to gauge how much.  I didn't know about full throttle though, I was trying to tone it down a bit so as to not overwork the saw.  You learn something new everyday!


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