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Author Topic: Making it through another year '21-'22  (Read 22789 times)

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Offline Tacotodd

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #440 on: November 27, 2021, 09:54:54 PM »
Tom, I can see your quotation now, “I can’t believe I drank the whole thing”.  ;) :D
Trying harder everyday.

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #441 on: November 28, 2021, 07:16:47 AM »
No Todd, I didn't drink the whole thing, just a little, but now I remember why I don't drink that stuff very often. ;D Everything is a little fuzzy and my back still aches anyway. :D ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #442 on: November 30, 2021, 08:45:22 PM »
Well Sunday we woke up to everything being white which was not really in the forecast (imagine that) and I got a call that CJ wasn't going to finish up his wood that day. Just as well, mu funk carried on, but I thought I should restart the shop stove before the building cooled off too much. Well I noticed a lot of smoke backing out of the stove, much more than would be normal with a cold chimney. By the time I realized I had to do some cleaning I had a half a load of logs in there. I had been doing other stuff, like splitting wood and house chores and the fire just limped along. SO I let it go along figuring Monday morning I would do the deed when it had burned out. Monday I took the chimney apart and cleaned it, but found a couple of spots where the acid had eaten through the steel. Nothing real structural, but leaks none the less and it would be stupid to put it back together. About that time I realized that every woodstove shop in a 3 county area if closed on Monday. I checked into and thought about ordering online, but then it might be a week before I got the pipe section I needed. Better to wait until today, and sure enough I found a shop that had my pipe in stock about 1/2 hour away. SO I finished the job today and as I type this the shop finally got up to 50 and is slowly climbing.

 So for the rest of Monday I did 'office work' because it was way too cold in the shop and overcast and nasty out enough that I wasn't going to the mill. I have this new property improvement client who contacted me for an appointment about a month ago. I am supposed to go meet with them this coming Sunday. which I conformed yesterday and set a time. In the meantime over the last month I have been doing a little research on their property here and there. They provided a good start, gave me the first owners name and some info on him. He had a sawmill, tavern, and other businesses on the property such as barrel staves established about 1798. He was a JP in the town, and the town was chartered around 1808. They knew most of the owners up to them. In my searches I discovered there are 9 boxes of records for the first owner in the State research library.

 So yesterday afternoon I began to get into it and found county soil surveys with detailed information on the various soil types around their property. there are detailed interactive maps online where you can find the different soil composition plots on a specific parcel. It is fairly complex (I don't do this stuff) so I decided to break it down for them because it speaks to how they might section their property for different uses. I made a lot of screen shots with each soil types and descriptions of each type. I organized it into a report of sorts (the soils section is 'appendix A') and listed their expressed plans, some discussion material, as well as a list of questions and some discussion about how to formulate a plan going forward. If nothing else, it provides something to refer to for questions and scribble notes on. I don't want to overload these folks with a lot of verbal information. Putting it in writing for them gives them something to re-read and think about. Right now it stands at 28 pages before I get there to start looking at trees, ground, and terrain. On 100 acres, there is a lot to consider in accomplishing their plans. All property clients are different. some know exactly what they want and they just need a hand, others need help figuring out what they want and how to get there. These folks seem to have an idea what they want, but are not sure the best way to get there and I believe they are looking at a 10-15 year plan. I am just trying to see them get off on the right foot with an awareness of what's possible and what is not practical.

 Anyway, the work so far has been interesting and I am already way over the 6 hours I usually figure for these first visits. In no way do I make money on these things, but they are very interesting and a lot of fun for me. They also keep me out of trouble. ;D

 BTW, in my research, I found that this original landowner, according to county records was an "Orthodox Quaker" and was granted a Tavern License. Now I never knew that there was such a thing and as an "Orthodox Quaker" or what that means. I did see that there were many others in the same period who were named as Quakers of many different variations. I also did not think Quakers were the types that would run Taverns. Again, this was around 1800. Anybody have any knowledge of this? Quakers were very populous in this area between 1675 and 1850, but they seemed to be many small groups rather than several large ones. 
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #443 on: November 30, 2021, 10:14:33 PM »
Tom,

   Sounds like your plans may be like my old boss used to say "Give them something to criticize." Its not really that negative. They don't know what they want but when you give them something the gray areas now start to become black or white and they can say what they like and what they don't and you can adjust from that. Many people just can't get the ball rolling but once you give it a nudge they can keep pushing it. Good luck with them Sorry about the snow. We had a few widely scattered snow flurries last week but nothing close to sticking yet and that is fine with me. I am covered up with little 1-2 day jobs around here and December looks like a real busy month if the weather permits. It is messing up my hunting schedule I did not go today as I knew I did not have time to work one up if I did shoot another. Stay safe.
Howard Green
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #444 on: December 01, 2021, 07:14:32 AM »
Well Howard, I hadn't thought about it, but I guess you are right. I seem to have dropped back into my old habits as a project planner in my previous 'life'. I would always make a list of every consideration and possible concerns when doing major machine installations. Everything went on the list and I would solicit concerns from everyone involved. Everything went into the pot from truck size requirements, over the road permits, bridge heights, door sizes, power requirements, floor weight capacities, technical issues and training on the new equipment, required support tooling, storage, and on and on. Then we would meet and either discard an item, or include it in the plan or discover new sub-items. After that everything went into a Gantt chart which listed the required time and materials and placed it in the timeline where it had to be so as not to interfere or hold up other tasks. This also helped identify items that could be handled in parallels with the same resources, saving time and/or money. When that was massaged around and balanced, it produced a workable timeline. (Then the boss would just demand that it happen in half the time  :D).

 So yeah, I have found that to be a reliable approach to start a major project that has always worked for me. If you sweat every small thing out in advance, the likelihood of having a large issue pop up at the worst time is greatly reduced and when that does happen, you are almost always in a better position to handle it.

 I always enjoyed the project management part of my job and I think I was pretty good at it because I got a lot of the major ones thrown my way over the years. Maybe, without realizing it, I am bringing those skills into these new projects as you say. I never realized that until now. Thanks for pointing that out because I was trying to think of a way to reduce the stress on this for the clients and not make it seem so daunting because that can be a scary thing and turn folks off. It is supposed to be a fun thing when you are forming up your retirement and legacy property and I hope to keep it that way for them. There will be unpleasantries along the path for them, but they should be expecting those and be able to deal with them if I have prepared them correctly.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Nebraska

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #445 on: December 01, 2021, 07:40:50 AM »


 So yeah, I have found that to be a reliable approach to start a major project that has always worked for me. If you sweat every small thing out in advance, the likelihood of having a large issue pop up at the worst time is greatly reduced and when that does happen, you are almost always in a better position to handle
Prior planning prevents p poor performance!
Sounds to me like an enjoyable project. You will give those folks a few paths to take to enhance the legacy of that property for the next generation.

  
How often do you have to clean that chimney? I thought those catalytic stoves burned enough cleaner than standard stoves to to really reduce the  buildup issue.  Just seems you've only burned a little more than I have (just short of a cord = me) Just got me wondering  now.

Offline aigheadish

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #446 on: December 01, 2021, 08:31:13 AM »
I agree it sounds like a neat project and learning about new areas around is always cool. I'd love to dig up the history of my "neighborhood". I assume, fairly positively, that it was just woods or farmland up until maybe the mid-1900's (first houses on the road appear to have shown up in the late 1960's maybe, other than a farmhouse or two). I've gone back and looked at historical Google Maps but that doesn't always show much. 
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #447 on: December 01, 2021, 05:45:14 PM »
Yes guys, this is a neat and fun project. I base my one time fee on 6 hours expended as a consultant (no physical labor or tools involved) and I have to agree with those who keep telling me I don't charge enough. I've got about 8 hours of research in writing in so far. Originally I had been working on small plots of just a few acres, this one is 100 and has a real history going back to around 1780. The soil considerations all play into it also. As I am not a trained forester, I have to work a bit harder to do the research. I also confess that I easily fall into interesting rabbit holes about prior owners and land uses. (I now know what an 'Orthodox Quaker" is.)
 So I spent a few more hours last night working up an appendix that discusses various ways to manage their project to consider. This morning I put another 3 hours into and appendix with regard to working with contractors and how to build a relationship. Much of that was learned form listening to all of us hear discuss good and bad clients as well as a local experience I have picked up over the decades. It stands at 35 pages now as a 'pre-field survey report' and I am about to send it off to them. I am concerned that it might be like drinking from a fire hose for them and it will be interesting to see how they accept it. I am thinking they should have time to read and think it over and develop good questions before we meet. Whichever way it falls will be interesting to see. My instinct tells me they will recognize it as useful work.
 It matters not to me. I have been enjoying the research quite a bit and learned quite a few things. My hope is to help them get started ont he right track, but as we all know, it takes two to tango. ;D
 -----------------------
 Today I got the shop up in the low 50's after a good overnight fire and didn't go out to work there until 1pm when I stoked it up and started cleaning and putting things away. Clearing the decks, in a manner of speaking. I did get the temp up to 59°. I did a lot of overdue vacuuming upstairs and put a bunch of tools away from too many little jobs already forgotten. I also did a few small out side chores, new batteries in one of the motion detector lights out back of the shop and other little doo-dads that needed doing. I should have gotten firewood stacked but I copped an attitude.
 Tomorrow is another one, maybe I will have a better plan. These days I check the weather in the morning before I decide. 
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Andries

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #448 on: December 01, 2021, 06:55:29 PM »
OG: Same here, what to do with my day is decided over breakfast while looking outside at the thermometer and the strength of the wind. It’s the kicker that says: an insider or outsider kinda day? 🤔 Then I balance that off with the better half and get a reading on the emotional weather report. 😏
.
Thinking of all the research you put into a report for the clients. It might be helpful for them if you included an Executive Summary. It should describe the results you’ve come up with, and the most important part, what their next five actions to achieve their goal would be. Those five hopefully overlap with what you’d like to do on their acreage. Less than a page long and bullets for the top five. 
That way, if they want to just decide next steps and getter done, they can. If the want to dive down the research rabbit hole with you, they have references and thirty five pages of deep thoughts to think on. 
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #449 on: December 01, 2021, 07:57:11 PM »
Andries, that's a very professional idea! Not sure I can pull that off. :D Actually, seriously, I like that and will do it after I do the field survey. I can't be sure of course, but I don't sense these are the kind of folks that would only read the executive summary. They have too much invested and are planning a legacy property through several generations. They will go over all the details. Perhaps not now, but in due time. These strike me as intelligent folks.
 I did send them the preliminary stuff and also added some 'reading caveats' lest they try to read too much into what I've written before we have met. I wanted them to have time to absorb some of it, but told them "If it's boring, skip it".
 We'll see how it goes over.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #450 on: December 03, 2021, 08:53:22 PM »
.....
  
How often do you have to clean that chimney? I thought those catalytic stoves burned enough cleaner than standard stoves to to really reduce the  buildup issue.  Just seems you've only burned a little more than I have (just short of a cord = me) Just got me wondering  now.
@nebraska, sorry, I meant to address your question before and it slipped my mind (not much room in there).  The cause was clearly my poor burning habits. During the winter months, with a nice supply of wood I burn for heat and keep the stove at relatively good working temps. Yes, it might be choked down overnight to hold the fire, but in the morning it gets stoked back up to bring the shop temp up. When that happens I hear the creosote just tinkling down the chimney. Those combustors require that the stove hit a certain temp before they kick in and the catalyst goes to work , and you can tell when it does, because it starts to glow red and a LOT of heat starts to come off that section of the stove (650° or more). My 'issue' was burning it low all the time because it was warm outside and I just needed a steady dry heat. The combustor never got to working temp and a lot of junk went up the chimney and cooled off. Now, I have a stick I use to give the chimney a whack once or twice a day which knocks that stuff down like icicles. On a conventional stove design it would all fall back into the stove. But this stove has a full smoke shelf and the junk falls on that and piles up (does not burn off). The pile gets higher and restricts the outflow. I can tell because when I open the door smoke rolls out continuously, also it can never really pull a good enough draft to make a good fire. So that means I have to let it burn out and at least pull the bottom chimney section out and clean out the pile inside the top of the stove. During a steady burn season this almost never happens. So I had cleaned the chimney in the late spring, just because and I noticed one of the 45's was getting whimpy and failed when I tried to put it back together. I ordered two and replaced one, knowing the other would go next time. This time as I was replacing the second one I saw the pin holes in the lateral 4' section so had to get one of those also. These issues are one of the reasons I am contemplating the purchase of an indoor wood furnace with a bigger firebox so I don't have to choke it down so much at night, but of course I will use more wood. That (firewood), for this year anyway, is an issue. Not enough hours in the day or gallons in my tank. I may augment with oil this year. I never fired up the oil burner all last year, not once. Now I am thinking a few bucks in that tank might save me a lot of work in firewood.
_______________________________________ __
Well, I have been bouncing around on a bunch of things the last couple of days. I ran the mill for a little bit yesterday, did something dumb in the process and will likely do my penance on that thread in a little while. I burned up some pretty ugly logs that just needed to be gone from the pile, lots of sweep and knots, etc. But I managed to pull some boards that are saleable on existing orders and some that will go into the shop roof. It could have been worse. We had BIG wind overnight and it was still windy enough this morning and I decided not to go run the mill in a whirlwind of sawdust. So I stayed home and worked a little more on that property evaluation report (37 pages now), stacking another half cord of wood and I did a quick check of the neighbors property's for downed trees. My neighbor across the road where I did all the TSI work was in fine shape, nothing to report. But the other neighbor got clobbered with a single tree.


 
 
Simple tree removal, but.... Her house is fed power by a set of primaries. This tree is being held up by what's left of those primaries. She has three poles coming down from the road to her house, on the last pole is a step down transformer for the house feed. That pole and equipment is fine thankfully, but the tree put enough stress on the lines to snap them into brillo pads. The middle pole in the string took the heat. This is 6' off the top of a 65' pole.


 
The cable and phone lines are intact. We could move the whole thing a little further down on the pole, but code requires a 65' pole for primaries. I called her to let her know what I had found. She already knew of course and had called Bill in the morning and he was working on it. So I called Bill and we coordinated. He was trying to get hold of the line crew that would be working on the job and working out the details with them to try to save the gal some money and get her back up ASAP. All that wire is her responsibility. So I kept my eye out for the crew but had to make a run to the store (I'm out of beer and I am not doing that Jack stuff again for a while) when I jumped in the truck and was pulling out, 3 utility trucks drove past, so I followed them while I called Bill but got his voicemail. So I walked up the the foreman and introduced myself. Before I could finish my first sentence, Bill pulled up driving his bucket truck home. We all walked the job together. Bill politely tried to politely wangle to figure out how we could get her back up with the least impact (did I mention Bill was very polite?). She has plans to bury that line completely, but with all the rock we have to get through that is a big expensive job. That pole is about 3,500 bucks and when the line is buried, it's (the poles) camp firewood, at best. Try as we might, the foreman had to recite the code and primaries require 65' poles. Bill is going to have to check his stock on poles to see if he has one, when the sun comes up. At any rate, we have a plan, the line crew was sympathetic and even gave us a replacement insulator for one that busted when it hit the ground. Saves us rooting through stock for one or a trip to the supply house.
 It kills me to see her having to deal with this. She is having a tough enough time going through her cancer right now as a single woman and didn't need this. We really want to make her life easier if we can, at least on this front. So tomorrow we will regroup, the line is locked out and we are good to proceed. We are all cool with the line crew and they gave us a few 'cues' on where we could save a little on stuff that will never be looked at. We'll hit it in the morning and see what we can get done. Bill may call in a few guys to help move it along. As long as the lines are down, we will likely drop a bunch of other trees that were marked to come down anyway. Ironically, the one that caused all this was not marked. Go figger.
 My table client came this afternoon and picked up his table, he continues to be pleased. :) So that's gone. I wasn't too happy when he said he was going to hide it in his shed until Christmas after I had been heating the shop for 3 weeks just to keep the thermal cycling low on that thing. Oh well, it's his now. :D
---------------------------------------------
So let me ask you folks something because I want to know if I am nuts or not. (Wait, don't answer yet, even if you can. let me ask the question(s) first.)
 So I did a beer run this evening and because I am only buying my cheap beer I don't want to go all the way to town and I just go to the local food store. Now this used to be a local family owned food store until Hannaford bought it up, fired most of the staff and changed everything to fit their corporate scheme. Now there are always long lines at the checkout because they don't have enough clerks and I never recognize any of the staff in there. None are towns folk whereas you always knew more than half the staff as neighbors and the kids of your friends, etc.. It's sure not the same, but whatever. The prices are a lot higher and they don't carry the stuff we used to buy there anymore, they have a lot of stuff we don't buy. But the place is a mecca for the weekenders who don't know any better and think they get good prices there. They also never venture far enough to find the good food stores down in town. Anyway, I walk in the door and see this sign on a bread rack:


 
My first thought is "what the He** is THAT supposed to mean?!"
Now, the bread on this rack comes from a bakery 2 hours drive from here, so NOT local in my book. In addition, we have several local bakeries that make good stuff and one of which makes VERY good stuff and is 15 minutes drive from this store and employs about 40 local folks. Their baked goods ship to some of the best shops and restaurants in NYC and we USED to be able to buy their bread in this store, but no more. Now they truck it in from 100 miles away (and call it 'local'). So  THAT really set me off. What kind of BS is this? The second thing that bothered me is what does that DANG sign mean? Is this playing up to the city people and telling them 'If you buy THIS bread, you become a local'? What kind of nonsense is that. Yes, we get it, city folks who own preparty here want to feel like they 'belong', but can they be so gullible as to think buying this bread makes that happen? Who thinks this stuff up, some pinhead sitting in an office 200 miles away?
 So my question(s) is(are) this(these): would this burn your bottom you if you saw it? Am I being a crotchety old curmudgeon? Am I overreacting? Should I continue to fuss over these things and call them out when I see them or just let it go or as my wife says "get over it"? Really this annoyed me so much that as I am tying this I am thinking I may go back and have a talk with the manager and at least let him know what B**S*** looks like. Am I all wet on this? I can say that even though I was thinking about picking up a good quality loaf of nice multigrain bread, I passed on the whole thing when I saw this.
 AH, tomorrow id another day and I guess I can pretend to be a lineman for a day, I always wanted to try that. ;D :D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Nebraska

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #451 on: December 03, 2021, 10:08:09 PM »
Great just fat fingered a post off into never never land....Thanks for the answer..

Anyway Tom yes that sign bugs me as well....

My idea was to leave a snarky sticky note stuck to that shop like a local sign saying "yeah some where else" or "at Lovetts Bakery" (insert correct name)...
Just a little mild act of disobedience. Just leave them every so often  


I use an add on wood furnace as  a supplemental heat source.  My chimney is insulated stainless steel inside a masonry chimney that rises through the 
center of the house so most of it holds heat and if I do a good job burning, it  doesn't  creosote up just some at the very top.  I have a chimney thermometer  I watch and it keeps me on track keeping the flu warm enough..  It's just a farm store add on but the wood furnace  has served us pretty well.  It a model that was made by US Stove Co.
It has a pretty good sized fire box and burns the sawmill waste just fine as long as it is reasonably dry.

Bless you guys for helping that lady out!!
If I had a 65 ft pole in my pile you'd be welcome to it.

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #452 on: December 03, 2021, 10:35:51 PM »
You know Nebraska there are neighbors and there are neighbors. This gal (I am guessing in her 50's but I am likely wrong) has all the 'markings' of just another 'weekender', yet she is not. She is a corporate lawyer working on music licensing for major clients her company produces. I am sure she is doing 'OK' financially. So you think you have a picture of how she 'fits in' but you'd be wrong, as I slowly learned. Her Dad and uncles were all loggers in Oregon where she grew up. She is no stranger to real work and has no issues shopping for a good splitting axe and stacking up her own firewood. When she does actually ask for help, it's because of a missing skill, not an unwillingness to do the work. She had a woodstove installed, but laid all the tile around it herself and asked if I could help her find the right kind of molding to trim it off. So I happily milled and machined up some nice ash that came from a tree she could have seen out her sliding glass doors when it was there. She liked that a lot. She not only showed up at a redneck party at Bill's that has a bit of a 'rough reputation' but she had a blast meeting folks and getting on with them. She gets it, embraces it, appreciates it, and soaks it in. She has been to more places around here learning the history and opportunities in the last year, than I have had time to see is 35 years. Yeah, she gets it.
 So yeah, when somebody like that could use a hand, it's a no-brainer. Drop what your doing and let's get this done. If she could help, she'd be right in the middle, but we need her to stay in a warm apartment/condo/thingy  and watch her health until we have the heat and lights on for her. and the house is up to temp. We want to keep her around. She is on a chemo break right now and intended to be up this weekend, but I told her to stay home. Folks like her are easy to care about. I don't feel like helping out with this as a favor, its an obligation. But that's just me.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Nebraska

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #453 on: December 03, 2021, 10:59:10 PM »
Tom I hope I'm not way off base but...

No I disagree it's an obligation  not to you or her. Itsan obligation to the generations before us that raised us and taught us the right way to treat each other. It's respect.  She was raised by people with a sense of community back in Oregon.  That's why she fits in yours.
:)

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #454 on: December 03, 2021, 11:06:33 PM »
Of course you are not off base, we agree, and I think I said that, or did it read wrong? This is what you do for people wo are part of your community. That's how I think anyway. maybe we both missed something here or I expressed it incorrectly.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Hilltop366

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #455 on: December 03, 2021, 11:08:10 PM »
Am I being a crotchety old curmudgeon?


Get off my lawn!! smiley_old_guy

:)

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #456 on: December 03, 2021, 11:10:38 PM »
Am I being a crotchety old curmudgeon?


Get off my lawn!! smiley_old_guy

:)
Yeah well, somebody has to remind folks about how things are done right.
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

Offline Tacotodd

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #457 on: December 04, 2021, 09:53:52 PM »
Tom, you’re doing the RIGHT thing for helping her out! Cancer is no joke. Hard to have a remission but easy to relapse into a bad spell. She sounds like good people and would help you guys if she thought that she could be of PROPER service, but you and the guys made the right call.👍 Good for ALL that were involved and her for remaining cognizant of the possibility of that relapse that COULD happen. Chemo is not fun on the best of days. If in doubt all that we half to do is talk to brother Ed about his cancer journey. Just wish that I could be there to help you guys. If nothing else I could serve as an example of what NOT to do. After all, I’m willing to try new stuff out but I’m not real sure just how much help I would be. (I’ve always had a heathy respect for power lines and left them alone. Just always seemed safer to me that way.) My hats off to you guys for going that extra mile for your neighbor. She’ll not soon forget it either!
Trying harder everyday.

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #458 on: December 05, 2021, 06:55:41 AM »
Well It was  a long day yesterday with more equipment than people. Self loading log truck, skid steer, bucket truck, compactor, and a few other odds and ends. We worked past dark and Bill kept asking "can you tell me if that line is straight?" and I'd reply that I couldn't even see that line. :D
 We took down the offending tree, which was the smallest of the day and 5 others, 2 white pines, 2 WO and a big ask. Except for one WO, the others were all around the 22" class. All dead and previously marked. Most of it loaded and some left for the homeowners firewood. (Smaller stuff that could be bucked and split easy, I'll do that later.)

 We got the birds nest of cables squared away, pulled the broken pole, set the new one then started the tedious job of getting it all strung back up and getting the right tension on the cables. It just takes time. It is 95% done. We came up short on one pickle to make a splice and a short piece of alumaclad to make a connection. We wound up leaving the bucket truck and skid steer there to finish up today.
 Unfortunately I can't help them today because I have that land consult visit to do. I came home last night, took the wife for a quick dinner a the diner we like, then came home, loaded up the Mule and hooked up the trailer, tended both stoves, took a shower, finalized my paperwork, and went to bed. I was beat and my bad foot was just getting it's feeling back.
 Up early today and walking out the door in 5 minutes for the hour drive. Here I go again. ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 562, & 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, but almost.

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Re: Making it through another year '21-'22
« Reply #459 on: December 05, 2021, 09:44:02 AM »
Tom,

   Glad you guys could help your neighbor lady. I often find some of the hardest work I do and greatest reward I get are often the ones I never collect one dime for doing.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"


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