The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => General Board => Topic started by: Forester Frank on November 13, 2000, 02:04:10 PM

Title: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: Forester Frank on November 13, 2000, 02:04:10 PM
Need Help.

Need a table or reference for buffering capacities and pH values of various tree species.

If anyone can help I would appreciate it. Thanks.

Forester Frank
Title: Re: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: Ron Scott on November 13, 2000, 04:23:19 PM
Frank,
Try the USDA-Forest Service Forest Products Lab in Madison Wisconsin. Their Wood Technology Unit may have such info.
Title: Re: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: Forester Frank on November 14, 2000, 03:28:53 AM
Thanks Ron. I'll give that a try.
Title: Re: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: Gordon on December 23, 2000, 08:34:45 PM
What tree has the best overall buffering capacity?
Thanks
Gordon
Title: Re: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: Gordon on April 03, 2002, 04:47:15 PM
Here is some buffering being done close to my house. Well it's the next state over.

http://www.naturalresources.umd.edu/Forest_Water.html#biosolids

Just page down some and there are links on the right handside of the page. I thought it was some interesting reading and added it to the Link Directory. That is if they let it in. ;D

Here is another link along the same lines.

http://www.unl.edu/nac/afnotes/spec-3/

Gordon
Title: Re: Buffering Capacity and pH of wood species
Post by: L. Wakefield on April 03, 2002, 04:59:30 PM
   Excellent reference. Are you interested in the buffering capability of the entire plant in the living state- or for some reason interested in how wood fiber interacts with, say acid rain if exposed to this?

  The question reminds me of watching my maple trees in WV in the rain. Sometimes the rainwater as it ran down the trees would look a bit 'foamy' as it pooled in uneven dips in the bark. I wondered about acid rain at that time, especially as the rainwater tasted somewhat acid to me. It's hard to tell if it's run down your face first, as contact with skin or sweat may change things. But I had wondered if I was seeing some type of reaction in progress.

  I suspect any buffering with the living tree in situ would involve the soil biohabitat at a very essential level.  lw