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Author Topic: How much rot do you allow?  (Read 1732 times)

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Offline Ianab

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2021, 05:47:21 PM »
I really think consistency is key to offering any product.  If you have less than desirable cords, market them accordingly, and if you have high quality cords do the same.  Figure out your own 'brand'; what you want to be known for. 


Agree with your post. 

I sell a bit of firewood, as a hobby more than anything. It's advertised as "dry", and "mixed". Pine and cypress are acceptable firewoods here, but I make sure I mix in a bit of good hardwood in every load. There will be some mill offcuts, some split rounds, some round limb wood from tree cleanups. And it's all decently dry. That way I don't have to sort the different types and have 3 different prices. 

Most of my sales are repeat customers or word of mouth, so customers must be thinking the deal is fair. 

As for the different BTUs for the wood. If you are selling "Mixed hardwood" then you can throw some soft maple and birch in there, as long as there is some White Oak / Hickory to balance it out. If you separate them, then you are back to having different prices depending on the BTUs. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline mike_belben

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2021, 06:18:06 PM »
What the market pays for firewood has more to do with the lowest priced sellers than the consumer education.  You just cant get $300cd if theres 5 guys selling for $160/cd.
Psalm 37:16

Offline Runningalucas

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2021, 07:34:17 PM »
I sell a bit of firewood, as a hobby more than anything. It's advertised as "dry", and "mixed". Pine and cypress are acceptable firewoods here, but I make sure I mix in a bit of good hardwood in every load. There will be some mill offcuts, some split rounds, some round limb wood from tree cleanups. And it's all decently dry. That way I don't have to sort the different types and have 3 different prices.

Most of my sales are repeat customers or word of mouth, so customers must be thinking the deal is fair.
I think the way you sell yours is great; actually adding in some higher btu's just as a mix 'bonus'.   My godfather was a single man hvac repair company for 30+ years.  He only had around 5 large customers, all repeat continual business.  His strategy was always a 'bonus', or in his words, he would do about 10% to 20% of his work free gratis.  Sounds like a lot, but not really, between those 5 customers, they allowed him to earn a very nice 6 figure income with no boss, and relatively wash, rinse, and repeat hvac repair. 
The skinny of it, find a niche, and do it with honesty,  integrity, and a can do attitude.
Life is short, tragedy is instant, it's what we do with our time in between that matters.  Always strive to do better, to be better.

Offline Skip

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2021, 07:55:55 AM »
I always tried to give them" a little more than they paid for " whether it was firewood or with the mill . It served me well. :) 

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2021, 07:56:41 AM »
I stopped selling the stuff decades ago and just burn it myself .Now here's where the chickens come home to roost .I have some stuff that had sat too long uncovered in the elements and it has degraded .It still contains heat it just takes more of it ,lots more .As luck would have it so far it's been a mild winter and with any luck by the time is does get cold I'll be rid of this stuff .I've got a fair amount of good dry white oak should we get a cold snap .White oak and ash  can take weather, hickory and maple don't do so well nor red oak and cherry .

Offline livemusic

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2021, 08:23:29 AM »
I stopped selling the stuff decades ago and just burn it myself .Now here's where the chickens come home to roost .I have some stuff that had sat too long uncovered in the elements and it has degraded .It still contains heat it just takes more of it ,lots more .As luck would have it so far it's been a mild winter and with any luck by the time is does get cold I'll be rid of this stuff .I've got a fair amount of good dry white oak should we get a cold snap .White oak and ash  can take weather, hickory and maple don't do so well nor red oak and cherry .
Al, interesting to see you say that hickory, maple and red oak don't take to being in weather very well. I have found that to be the case. Don't know I can say that about cherry so much around here. I am surprised that hickory and red oak don't do better, such as white oak does. Lately, I have found some black locust and am rather intrigued with it. Based on how good some dead ones are, even on the ground, I assume it will 'weather' just fine if not babied. Also found some water locust (lots of thorns like honey locust) and am going to try it as firewood.
~~~
Bill

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2021, 09:32:34 AM »
Some of it just takes weather better than others .For example catalpa which is fairly soft was grown in groves in  these parts for fence posts .Little odd patches that were hard to farm became an endless supply of fence posts .The fences as well as the catalpa patches along with the giant dairy barns are almost all gone now .  Corn as far as the eye can see in some parts .

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2021, 10:00:34 AM »
It's all a little different .For example white oak while not actually rot proof is resistant to same .What I'm burning now had been in rounds for 8 to 10 years and finally split this past September .It's dry as a bone and burns well .
The shag bark hickory was a wind blown and has some spalting which also burns well .The wood wasn't really rotten just lacks any moisture for about 3-4 inches on the outside of the round .
About 10:30 -- 11 each evening I load the bottom layer of wood in the insert using the oak and lay the shag over top of that .Over the night the oak coals up and the shag covers it with ashes .Rake it in the morning and if it had a forced draft blower you could forge a horse shoe in it .Toss in some oak and before the coffee is made I have a roaring fire .
This is actual ground hog day but a likeness of same has gone on the last 10 months, not much changes .Excepting during summer you don't have tend the fire . :)

Offline Blueknife

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2021, 10:14:16 PM »
Lately, I have found some black locust and am rather intrigued with it. Based on how good some dead ones are, even on the ground, I assume it will 'weather' just fine if not babied.
Black locust will last longer than pressure treated lumber, given the same conditions. Wish there was more of it around here. That's one thing I miss about the east.

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2021, 09:56:12 PM »
The hard truth of it is is if the salvaged dead fall has lain on the floor long enough it will have some rot .It might be worth chunking up or it may not .Most of my dead fall is worth the time .If it's water logged it will require some dry out time though .Cut in spring, burn in winter .Been doing it for decades .
  

Offline brianJ

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2021, 07:55:44 AM »
The pieces you pictured would go right in the sale pile for me, keeping in mind it's a roadside "campfire wood" type of situation. Originally, I began selling campfire wood as an outlet for marginal firewood that was rotting away in in a neglected woodlot belonging to a friend of mine, TSI if you will. Inspiration came from research, I believe on this forum, from a gentleman that kept a "knots, rots and butts" bin at his firewood sales area, which priced accordingly, he couldn't keep up with.



Scott B.
Bonfires are a regular feature for some guys at work.   It has worked out I am the source of the material.   Knots rots & butts is a lot of it.    There is always some of that in every tree.   
You guys know when you are working down a branch.   Still six inches cant waste that.   Four inches is even better since it don't need splitting.   3 inches even 2 inches Should I take one more piece or not?      Wonder no more lope off a 4 foot section good for the bonfire.      
Sure makes clean up easy and a tidy pile when Im done at the field edge.    The landowners like that look

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #31 on: February 12, 2021, 09:19:43 PM »
You might find it surprising because I did .I don't advise doing it but I let a pile of shag bark bark hickory get way from me .Outside, no cover for at least 7 or 8 years and yes the rot got to it .Because my supply is getting lower that I expected it to because of colder weather I'm burning it .Even dry as a bone and light as a feather it's doing just fine considering every thing .So for your own stuff don't bon fire it because it still has heat .
It's going to be nip and tuck this winter .I might have another month and I might make it without going to the woods or I might not .This will never happen again .

Offline cutterboy

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2021, 07:39:26 AM »
Al, you're right about this winter being a cold one. I'm going through a lot of wood right now. I put up extra wood last year and I'm happy I did. I'm in good shape.
In the fall and winter of 2019 I cut up a lot of dead birch and got carried away with it as some of it was pretty far gone. I'm burning some of that nasty stuff now. I figured I'd throw it in the stove just to get rid of it but it's burning better and longer than I expected and giving off some good heat. Just goes to show you...it all burns and gives off heat.

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: How much rot do you allow?
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2021, 08:11:47 AM »
It's surprising just how good degraded hardwoods do for a fire .I have a routine that seldom changes .I load the stove up at night throttle the air intake and go to bed right after the 11 PM news .Up around 5:30 AM .Rake the ashes to uncover the coals and toss in a couple of small pieces .Make the coffee and by then I have a roaring fire once again . The fire almost never goes out from mid November to mid to late March .


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