The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill  (Read 1613 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Freddie

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« on: November 19, 2019, 06:31:41 PM »
Hi,  I almost have my saw mill done after one year of building. I am now thinking of using an electric motor on it. Can someone tell me how many horse electric motor I would need on a mill that I can cut about 30 inch diameter logs.? Thank you very much for the help.       Freddie

Offline Brad_bb

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4609
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Joliet, IL and Indy
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2019, 06:59:32 PM »
Woodmizer offers a 10hp single phase and 3 phase for my LT15.  When you say 30 inch dia logs, are you referring to the max log diameter that you can break down, or the max throat width you'd be sawing (max slab width).  My LT15 can do up to a 28" log, but that means breaking it down to a 24" or less cant, because my max throat opening is 24.5".  My understanding is that they are offering the same 10hp motor on the LT15wide, which has a max throat opening of about 34.5".  
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline Dana Stanley

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 329
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Whitinsville, Mass.
  • Gender: Male
  • For fun and profit!
    • Share Post
    • Stanley Carpentry Construction
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2019, 07:10:54 AM »
10 HP single phase! How much amperage would that draw?
Making Sawdust, boards and signs.
Woodland Mills HM-126
Kabota B-7800 with backhoe and loader
Ford Ranger, Husqvarna 455 20", Mac 610 24", other chainsaws 14", 23 ton log splitter
Matthew 3:10

Online thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 31830
  • Age: 60
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2019, 07:18:29 AM »
Freddie,welcome to the forum. Electric is nice. Nice and quiet. ;D
What's the plan for the lumber?
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Online btulloh

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4198
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Midlothian, VA
  • Gender: Male
  • I never met an air conditioner I didn't like
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2019, 09:51:40 AM »
10 HP single phase! How much amperage would that draw?
A bunch! 60 amps @ 220v I think.  Plus start-up current.
HM126

Offline wisconsitom

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 559
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Appleton, WI
  • Gender: Male
  • Deep in the larch
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2019, 12:43:32 PM »
btulloh, because I dance around all of these threads dealing with electrically-powered bandsaw mills, I noted your power requirements for single-phase 10 HP.  This is of interest as I will be wiring a shed for power next year and want to make certain I've allowed for this future possibility.  I may at some point have an electrically-powered WM or equivalent mill sitting next to that shed.

So, the electrical needs for that shed will be minimal.  Just a few lights, etc. No big draw.  But if that sawmill shows up some time in the future, I'd hate to have not placed sufficiently robust circuitry in place.  So, to be clear, are you saying that a circuit being used to power one of these units-for the sake of this discussion, let's just say the mill is an LT-15 manual-should be of 60-amp capacity?  Please note, I don't think 3-phase is ever going to make it down that country road.

Thanks!
Far as I can tell, it's 6 of one, half a dozen of the other...

Online btulloh

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4198
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Midlothian, VA
  • Gender: Male
  • I never met an air conditioner I didn't like
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2019, 01:02:29 PM »
Id recommend at least consulting with a licensed electrician for your wiring. I was just winging that estimate based on running my 5hp motors on 30 amp circuits. Your requirements will depend on the specifics of your overall installation. My guess is that Woodmizer would have recommendations as well. 

A quick glance here Eng toolbox says a good rule of thumb is 7 amps/hp 230v. 

Ten hp/single phase is asking a lot, but clearly doable. 
HM126

Offline wisconsitom

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 559
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Appleton, WI
  • Gender: Male
  • Deep in the larch
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2019, 01:25:11 PM »
Thanks bud, that's helpful.  So, if this happens-and I know such matters are subject to change-I will most likely be in the softwood world most of the time.  A key goal of mine may be to make useful items out of thinned material from a plantation consisting primarily of red pine, white pine, Norway spruce, and hybrid larch.  In particular, a good chunk of larch wood is going to become available in the near future at that site.

At this point, I'm not into slabs and all that.  I mean, I like that stuff, but it's just not the lane I'm in.  I'd get more satisfaction milling dimension stuff, flooring, paneling, decking planks, etc.  Maybe bevel siding or board and batten.  Stuff I can use right there.  I have no particular plans aimed at commercial sawing for customers at this time.  That too could change, but right now, is not a priority.

So yeah, maybe a bit undersized, but I want to be able to take my time learning to saw manually, with an electrically-powered saw, using primarily softwood logs from my own property.  There is zero economic imperative here, other than my need to not go broke doing it!

This thread is just one whack at it.  My nephew the electrician will certainly be on board when this happens.  WM or equivalent vendor will surely be consulted.  But this information helps.
Far as I can tell, it's 6 of one, half a dozen of the other...

Online btulloh

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4198
  • Age: 69
  • Location: Midlothian, VA
  • Gender: Male
  • I never met an air conditioner I didn't like
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2019, 01:32:23 PM »
Sounds reasonable.  We all have different goals and theyre all valid. Thigs do evolve too, and then we adjust our equipment. It sounds like you have plan and youre ready to move forward. 
HM126

Offline Freddie

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2019, 05:46:08 PM »
 Ok guys, thank you for the information. It sounds like a ten horse single phase would work just fine. So, I looked up the price of a ten horse electric motor and discovered that they must be made of some precious metal of some kind. They cost more than I have in the whole mill. I have an eight horse gas engine that I think I will install on the mill. If that isn't big enough for my needs. I will look for a larger gas engine.
  I am new to sawmills. Does anyone have any recommendations as to should I but a cant hook or a peeve. Why would one be better than the other. Thanks again for any and all suggestions.                    Freddie

   Oops, I forgot to say that I am doing this just to have something to do. I would like to just saw some lumber for me and my neighbors. 

Offline scsmith42

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5590
  • Age: 61
  • Location: New Hill, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • He who dies with the most toys... WINS!!!
    • Share Post
    • Whispering Pines Farm
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2019, 05:59:22 PM »
Re motor sizing, it all depends upon what production rate you want to achieve.  

Personally for a mill that would handle 30 logs with ease, I would want at least 30hp electric.

The standard motor size for a Woodmizer LT40 is 25 hp.

If youre underpowered your blade will stall in the cut.  If youre underpowered your blade will not cut properly and may burn the lumber, especially if its an older log.  10hp will not let you mill very quickly on 30 logs, but would be fine on a 14 log.

What width bands are you planning to use?  
Peterson 10" WPF with 65' of track
Smith - Gallagher dedicated slabber
Tom's 3638D Baker band mill
and a mix of log handling heavy equipment.

Offline Freddie

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2019, 08:20:37 PM »
1 1/4 inch blades.

Offline Oddman

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
  • Location: Southern MO
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2019, 09:02:33 PM »
Figured somebody would mention 3 phase converters in this discussion. Seems an easy path to getting 3 phase power.

Offline Kindlinmaker

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 163
  • Age: 62
  • Location: Hudson Valley, NY
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Electric motor in place of gas motor on saw mill
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2019, 09:14:07 PM »
I run my LT15 10 HP single phase on a 50 amp circuit using a 50 6 ga. stranded wire extension cord from my shop terminating at a 50 amp throw switch with 50 amp slow burn fuses.  Another 35 of 8 ga. Stranded wire from the switch up into the saw. Put a line amp meter on once and the start-up surge was in the low 40s and the run under load was in the mid to upper 30s as I recall.  Have never tripped the breaker or burned a fuse.   I saw a lot of large yard hardwoods having to trim the sides off to fit between the posts on the mill. I might slow down the feed rate a bit on huge logs but not noticeably and less than I would slow crossing a big knot.  All that electric wire was initially expensive but I imagine it has given me a hundred fold payback over the years with electric vs. gas savings and $0 maintenance cost. Throw in neighbors 100 from my mill who tell me they cant hear me sawing inside their houses and I have never regretted the decision to go electric. 


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
How big of an electric motor for bandsaw mill?

Started by Dan_Shade on Sawmills and Milling

10 Replies
20111 Views
Last post May 09, 2005, 07:58:26 AM
by Haytrader
xx
clutch for electric motor mill

Started by sawmark52 on Sawmills and Milling

15 Replies
3645 Views
Last post April 27, 2011, 09:50:43 PM
by sawmark52
xx
Swing mill electric motor build

Started by still at it on Sawmills and Milling

6 Replies
1036 Views
Last post February 08, 2018, 01:01:40 PM
by still at it
xx
ideas for electric feed motor for homemade mill?

Started by markct on Sawmills and Milling

14 Replies
10236 Views
Last post August 29, 2008, 11:23:27 PM
by redprospector
 


Powered by EzPortal