The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: DR_Buck on July 24, 2016, 09:02:00 PM

Title: Cherry Flavored Cookies
Post by: DR_Buck on July 24, 2016, 09:02:00 PM
I almost posted this thread in the 'FOOD' board.   :D       I had a milling job to do large cherry slabs for a customer. The slabs were 8 ft by 2 ft at 12/4 and heavy. They're in the kiln now.    Customer also brought some stump logs (firewood) that they wanted cut into 3" cookies and kiln dried also.   I talked them out of the kiln drying but they still wanted cookies.    >:(     I hate sawing cookies, but at $70 an hour  :o   I'll saw them all day and still hate it.    8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/Cookies.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1469408120)
Title: Re: Cherry Flavored Cookies
Post by: WV Sawmiller on July 24, 2016, 09:21:27 PM
Dr Buck,

   How do you prepare the cookies before putting in the kiln? Do you coat them heavy with anchorseal or such? My experience with cherry is it is bad to check and I figured cherry cookies would almost explode if put in a kiln to dry? Please explain the process you are using.
Title: Re: Cherry Flavored Cookies
Post by: DR_Buck on July 24, 2016, 10:55:32 PM
Dr Buck,

   How do you prepare the cookies before putting in the kiln? Do you coat them heavy with anchorseal or such? My experience with cherry is it is bad to check and I figured cherry cookies would almost explode if put in a kiln to dry? Please explain the process you are using.


Didn't kiln dry the cookies.   I talked the customer out of doing that.    I won't kiln dry any cookies as there is a 100% chance of them coming apart, or at best splitting.  These are just stickered and stacked waiting for the customer to come get them.   They were also warned that they may split anyway.  No guarantee that they will stay in one piece.

Title: Re: Cherry Flavored Cookies
Post by: Satamax on July 25, 2016, 07:09:50 AM
I wonder if swamp drying could do the job.

To explain, the old boat builders in French Britany, used to dump oak trees or already cut pieces in the silt/mud of a brakish swamp. To rest for a while 5 to 30 years, before drying it. The sap would be replaced by minerals by then. And the drying would not lead to shrinkage so much.  Also, due to the high mineral content, the wood becomes extremely hard when dry.

The problem is the time before you use it is very long. And you get only one collor, dark brown.
Title: Re: Cherry Flavored Cookies
Post by: simonlow on July 25, 2016, 12:27:11 PM
linseed oil/turps twice a day should do the job for 'special' pieces.