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Obsessed w. Yellow-Cedar in eastern Quebec

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seedling:
greetings

I'm new here, this is my second posting, the first one appears to have timed out.

At 77 years of age, while doing research to plant 250 trees last summer, I became OBSESSED with the idea of migrating yellow-cedar to my supposedly hostile eastern Quebec near 58n66w (many samples ARE growing here but all too far for me to visit). Whatwith global warming and all, the lowest winter temps are now about -15c instead of -25c, and there are 3-4 secluded, protected, and wetter corners on my land where I think I might be successful. Last year I bought some seeds, half of them are out in cold-bed waiting for the snow to melt, the other half failed to germinate when potted. I'm NOT optimistic.

I'd like to clarify some basics before taking shovel again this spring, which I will even if the odds be absolute zero (I happen to be like that):

Is the weeping variety less viable, is it also shorter?

Does anyone know of a Canadian retail source for seedlings? I wanna avoid import red-tape with Agriculture-Canada, and wholesalers don't really wanna waste time with retail accounts.

The species seems to in danger, habitat is both dying out and being overrun while the seeds (according to my theory) can't migrate without help to other just as ideal habitats but too far away. Am I full of it?

Thanks for any help!

BTW how do I set to be emailed when my postings are replied to?

SwampDonkey:
With yellow cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis  or Cupressus nootkatensis due to findings in 2010 in molecular genetics), they need lots of moisture, not tolerant of heat, viable seed in mature cones is very low. I wish you success, but I would be prepared for disappointment. ;)

You'd probably have to make contact with these folks.

Forest Nursery Association of BC

seedling:

--- Quote from: SwampDonkey on March 02, 2021, 06:39:07 AM ---With yellow cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis  or Cupressus nootkatensis due to findings in 2010 in molecular genetics), they need lots of moisture, not tolerant of heat, viable seed in mature cones is very low. I wish you success, but I would be prepared for disappointment. ;)

You'd probably have to make contact with these folks.

Forest Nursery Association of BC

--- End quote ---
Thanks for the input, the link too. The coastal bedrock under my land is broken in places with the inland end sometimes lower. Plus a ravine. In these locations there are healthy trees in microclimates partly because moisture is finding an easy route to surface. The other 90% of the land is in hay production. In the ravine fresh water seeping up is never frozen, not even at -20c plus there is a good yard of snow cover. In addition to mini forests in the 3-4 depressions the trees also provide wind protection. Closer to the sea dessication haunts red-pines 1 year out of 10, from which they recover the next year.  Finally I am prepared for failure but sofar I haven't been able to fail even, not with a live seedling anyway, I have yet to have a single viable shoot to plant :).
My plan would be to scatter seedlings at different distances into these micro-climate depressions and let them grow according to the suitability of conditions, if grow they would.

saskatchewanman:
When attempting to move species around, finding suitable seed sources and seedlings is often difficult. When extending a range in a changing climate, sourcing plants and seeds at the margins of existing distribution is a useful start. In other cases finding sources that came from a similar environment or latitude is a good strategy.

Plant enough individuals to sample genetic diversity. Planting a single tree that subsequently dies only tells you that individual tree was not suitable. How many... 100 or more is better. Also try several seed sources if possible. 

I see that PRT currently has 1100 surplus Yellow Cedar seedlings available in Campbell River BC. You could try them but shipping would be expensive

seedling:

--- Quote from: saskatchewanman on March 06, 2021, 11:21:37 AM ---When attempting to move species around, finding suitable seed sources and seedlings is often difficult. When extending a range in a changing climate, sourcing plants and seeds at the margins of existing distribution is a useful start. In other cases finding sources that came from a similar environment or latitude is a good strategy.

Plant enough individuals to sample genetic diversity. Planting a single tree that subsequently dies only tells you that individual tree was not suitable. How many... 100 or more is better. Also try several seed sources if possible.

I see that PRT currently has 1100 surplus Yellow Cedar seedlings available in Campbell River BC. You could try them but shipping would be expensive

--- End quote ---
Thanks for chiming in, I've written PRT already and to other wholesalers too, one of the problems is industrial boxes of 200+. Otherwise I agree with everything you say.
The guy who sold me the seeds wrote to say that what I planted in cold-bed last summer might just produce a few viable seedlings. One thing is sure, if any of what I plant here grows at all I'll try to get seeds from such survivors ..though my number of years remaining is like toilet paper, close to the end it rolls off awful fast :)
Are there any growing in your neck of the woods, I mean of the wheatfields?

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