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Author Topic: long term storage of dry goods.  (Read 4885 times)

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Offline doc henderson

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #40 on: October 02, 2022, 08:35:20 AM »
So...  How do the fruit raised squirrels taste?   :D :D :D
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Offline 21incher

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #41 on: October 02, 2022, 09:09:18 PM »
Like chicken 😋.  We find pick items that have multiple  uses that you currently buy. Like a sack of flour that can be used to bake bread, make spaghetti and noodles, make pizza crusts, make pie crusts, batted fish and many more things. Another good item is an assortment of dried and canned (goya) beans of different types that can be used for soups, ground for dips, chili,  even make a meal with  rice. Look for good dates on the cans and if you don't  use them donate them to your  local food pantry before they expire. 
 You also are in a good position being a Doctor that should  be able to barter for items if it gets  really  bad. With Japan, England,  and China  dumping US bonds possibly being followed  by other countries higher interest  rates can affect growers, farmers, and the supply chains that all rely on credit. I wouldn't bother with the mre type meals that last 25 years  because the government has enough  to go around if it gets  that bad. One thing we also have are some of those  life straws that can help purify water for drinking. 
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Offline taylorsmissbeehaven

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #42 on: October 03, 2022, 06:55:50 AM »
Like you said Doc, Im not a Prepper either. I do buy in bulk at Costco and sales at the grocery. We had a miller episode a couple weeks ago. Had pasta, flour, and rice packed in heavy zip top bags. It was no match for them. Only stuff that made it was in jars. Mary found some cool stackable containers on Amazon. Gonna give them a try when they get here. Your not saving anything if you have to throw a bunch away ::) 
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Offline kantuckid

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #43 on: October 03, 2022, 08:01:48 AM »
Like chicken 😋.  We find pick items that have multiple  uses that you currently buy. Like a sack of flour that can be used to bake bread, make spaghetti and noodles, make pizza crusts, make pie crusts, batted fish and many more things. Another good item is an assortment of dried and canned (goya) beans of different types that can be used for soups, ground for dips, chili,  even make a meal with  rice. Look for good dates on the cans and if you don't  use them donate them to your  local food pantry before they expire.
 You also are in a good position being a Doctor that should  be able to barter for items if it gets  really  bad. With Japan, England,  and China  dumping US bonds possibly being followed  by other countries higher interest  rates can affect growers, farmers, and the supply chains that all rely on credit. I wouldn't bother with the mre type meals that last 25 years  because the government has enough  to go around if it gets  that bad. One thing we also have are some of those  life straws that can help purify water for drinking.
Like chicken-not hardly! Unless your talking dark meat as squirrels are dark meat. The younger they are, the more tasty but honestly they are a pure pest for us. I kept a shotgun on the dining room table all spring having declared full out war. Their wariness and ability to breed won out. it's not unusual up here on our hill to 2's and 3's running all over the place. 
For some weird reason, they decided to begin to chew on my log homes front extension log corners to hone their teeth. They haven't made structural damage but have wreaked havoc. Our home is a sort of "monkey island" in the woods for mostly greys and a few fox squirrels and even some half breeds. 
I ate them out in KS in my youth (mostly squirrel pie) but much preferred rabbit legs & quail.
 
Bartering is mostly old school mentality and not seen much now days? Docs billing's are not done by an old time office worker or the docs wife, they are done via specialist who know the insurance routings and it's not something a doc matters much with? 
MRE's I know all to well and as long as our grocery has stuff to cook, perish that thought... ::) 
As we find ourselves being told we need to wean from fossil energy, the idiots might want to consider where our fertilizers come from? Can't grow much wheat on wind & solar energy. 
Grains: There are no longer sales in a grocery on flours or pastas, so on. A few prices are better than others but storage even when frozen is not a forever thing. 
Goya beans are VG but cost more than most any other brand seen on any USA shelf. We buy private brands always, exception is a select few items where quality varies. 
Many easy to prepare foods are in somewhat varied supply but mostly they come and go and we watch for the "come into stock days". One such item is SeaPak breaded butterfly shrimp. A $10 box makes 4 total, easy fast meals for my wife who's already done her share of feeding people. Potatoes are much higher but when you consider fast food taters and such they are so much cheaper that it's a non-discussion overall.
Interest rates are the larger concern than bonds for most of us? My kids retirement accounts are the worry for current reckless government spending. 
If Europe ever begins to start bearing the immense cost of Ukranian war weaponry, then it will get a bit more tenuous. We, the US taxpayers are carrying their water right now for Ukraine to stay in the fight.   
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Offline kantuckid

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #44 on: October 03, 2022, 08:08:35 AM »
Membership stores test my little brains ability to justify? Paying to be allowed to spend money at a big box store is totally illogical, not a privilege one should pay for? maybe a social club where you're keeping out the riff raff, so to speak, but a store you pay to spend in?  Much is a container too large for any sane purpose? Pickles in huge jars, boxes of stuff more like a military kitchen or NGO feed the masses place.
Please don't even try to make me think it makes sense. My SIL, who lives alone and is far, far from a bulk buyer, says it (Sam's Club) saves her money on gas but truth is she goes out of her way to buy it at prices higher than I pay to begin with.
Even if you have a business there are many sellers who'll sell to you w/o membership. I do know a couple in MX who own a motel where they had no other choices for supplies but thats not here where many exist. Big box stores are seeing direct web sales kill that mega store mentality?
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Offline beenthere

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #45 on: October 03, 2022, 10:45:25 AM »
kykid
It must work for them. People don't enter with theft in mind, or the gangs of kids that run through and wreck or steal things then run out quickly. People don't end up at checkout without at least the store credit card. Likely not like whatever wanders in to do mischief or harm in other store settings.
And the goods are quality.
Must work, because these stores do a ton of business.

But each of us has choices.

Looking up (google) how to keep bugs out of food, there are some containers that work. Plastic is not listed as one of them. Tupperware didn't look good, as well as plastic ziploc bags.
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Offline 21incher

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #46 on: October 03, 2022, 02:06:32 PM »
I agree with  been there. The main reason we belong to and shop at Costco  is the quality  of people  that shop there and the employees.  Even if their prices were higher then everyone  else we would  still remain  members.  We average $350 a year in cash back every  year that easily covers the $119 membership fee. I save approx $4k every time I upgrade  hearing aids. Gas and diesel  are over 50 cents a gallon less then everyone else plus an additional  4% cash back. It's a very senior  friendly place to shop with no screaming  kids or nasty people.  They double  the warranty on all electronics and appliances.  My 75 inch Samsung  smartTV came with a doubled warranty  plus 5 additional  years full coverage with replacement if it can't  be fixed for a total of 7 years for free. The Kirkland products  are held to a very high quality  standard and affordably priced.  Their fresh seafood we buy a lot of is flown in fresh and higher quality  then any other in the area. The savings  are great but what makes the 75 mile round trip worth it to us is the shopping experience and old fashioned atmosphere. .  
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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #47 on: October 03, 2022, 03:16:34 PM »
The only thing I see missing in most stores, even COSTCO, is Purity corn meal for making corn bread. :D We can get a cereal type corn locally, has to be cooked, but works just as well. No, we aren't members at COSTCO but shop once a year maybe on my cousin's account. I see no advantage on food. We have as good a quality of food in the big chains as they have there, and nothing to be saved dollar wise. My cousin goes in because she works near one in a hospital.  We also know someone that goes for propane. But she isn't saving because the gas burnt to get there, she's 100 miles from there. Makes no sense to spend $5 to make $3. :D I have a couple senior relatives near there to and they rarely go. Most seniors up here are not buying big loads of groceries even if there is a perceived savings. What I see big loads of is someone wheeling two carts full of soda pop. :D :D

I've seen no difference in the people shopping in Superstore or Costco, nor do I hold any grudges.  I've never seen a bunch of kids case a joint and run off with grub yet. Sounds more like something to see in a small corner convenience store in a city. Mom or dad with their pay check treating the kids with comfort food for the weekend, can't be all that bad.  :D

Costco up here is anything but old fashioned. ;D

Also the dried 25 year stuff isn't to live off of, it's for emergency. I'd say good luck depending on government to supply you. Depending on where your at, you may never see much of it. And if it came right down to it, it won't last too long. Governments have said for years there isn't that big of a backup supply, just a few weeks, certainly not 3 years worth. Maybe some people can live awhile off flour and maple syrup. :D

Our Superstore is the busiest grocery store, Sobeys is the other chain, prices tend to be a little higher over there.
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Offline bigblockyeti

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #48 on: October 03, 2022, 03:44:52 PM »
I think Costco is the number 1 retailer in wine & diamonds in the US (world?) because their model works.  Proximity is a bonus for us, it's 18 minutes and 11 miles to get there, many mouths to feed and butts to wipe further justify it.  As much as I like snacking my way through lunch on a Saturday, that's when I least prefer to visit as it's just too crowded and if anyone is likely to get run over in the parking lot, it's probably going to be on a Saturday.  We need a new sofa and loveseat, we've got ~$5K into ours now and the kids are beating the crap out of both, I can get a new sectional of comparable quality for $2K even in 2022 dollars but I'm holding out until the kids can stop continuing to detroy what we have.  I don't mind buying large quantities of something if we'll end up using it before it expires and the deals can't be beat when something goes on sale.  Gas used to be a solid $0.30 cheaper than everywhere else but now it's only ~$0.10 cheaper, likely the same % as fuel prices have fallen (not yet far enough).  We don't buy 80lbs of flour or 50lbs of rice but when frozen chicken breast goes on sale, I measure how much room is available in the freezer.  Some of their baked goods aren't super deals and can expire quickly, their cakes are great and offered for the price of the ingredients it seems.  Coffee beans are cheaper than anywhere else & paper products usually are too.  They have decent clothes for the kids and while the men's clothes selection isn't great, what they do have is quality stuff for less than even online.  When we move, the cooktop, BBQ, fireplace starter, clothes dryer & double oven will all be propane.  I can legally carry up to five 100lb bottles to the next closest Costco down the road (and we'll be further in the opposite direction) to get filled for less than half what delivery would be for a permanent above ground tank.  Even 80 minutes and 67 miles round trip will be paid for in savings with the 2-3 times per year I have to drive to the further Costco.

Offline Southside

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #49 on: October 03, 2022, 04:09:40 PM »
It's like anything else, you need to be aware of what you are shopping for.  Not everything is bulk sized, frozen lasagna for example - comes in a two pack, you don't have to cook both at once you know.   :D
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Offline kantuckid

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #50 on: October 04, 2022, 09:12:19 AM »
kykid
It must work for them. People don't enter with theft in mind, or the gangs of kids that run through and wreck or steal things then run out quickly. People don't end up at checkout without at least the store credit card. Likely not like whatever wanders in to do mischief or harm in other store settings.
And the goods are quality.
Must work, because these stores do a ton of business.

But each of us has choices.

Looking up (google) how to keep bugs out of food, there are some containers that work. Plastic is not listed as one of them. Tupperware didn't look good, as well as plastic ziploc bags.
In the grocery business I learned a long time ago that a sealed bag/container doesn't prevent buggy grain products.
 They are IN THERE, already. 
We don't have gangs of kids at my Walmart, lots of regular folks, many middle income and below here. Lots of old farts too :D
 Shoplifting in box stores: it happens both places and less so in non-bagging stores like Costco and Sam's club. Between bulk pkg and non bagging some shoplifting controls itself. Note that HD & Lowes don't have such stores. 
They all damned well have a loss prevention in place, that I can assure you of! 
Sure it works for them it's capitalism, not a secret plan. 
 Pretty tough to stick 175 pickles in a jar bigger than a whales head in yer pocket? :D  or score some stolen Cheerios in boxes intended for an institutional kitchen, etc., etc.. Choices abound, that part we agree on. Saving enough to pay to shop in a store always further down the road by an hour each way, I'll pass on them. Two people can only eat so much stuff, we are a long, long ways from justifying a Costco or Sam's Club membership dollar wise even if I did live there. 
Wine and diamonds, my two favorite buys :D 
If yer not making corn bread with Martha White Hotrize yer missing the boat. 

Does our USA guvment still stockpile butter, etc??  
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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #51 on: October 04, 2022, 01:56:22 PM »

Does our USA guvment still stockpile butter, etc??  
I thought it was cheese. And I thought the less fortunate didn't want anything to do with it. Who wants to eat cheese every meal? ;D I only want a little bite of hard chedder 5 year aged, maybe 3 times a week but not a meal's worth. :D It does make awesome home made mac-and-cheese though. Far superior to boxed stuff. ;D

Purity corn meal has been an old staple for eons up here. But substitutes we do have and work fine. Speerville is the brand name and it's stone ground and nothing added to it. Can't think it's too difficult to grind corn. :D :D
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Offline Raider Bill

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #52 on: October 04, 2022, 04:06:08 PM »

Does our USA guvment still stockpile butter, etc??  
I thought it was cheese. And I thought the less fortunate didn't want anything to do with it. Who wants to eat cheese every meal? ;D I only want a little bite of hard chedder 5 year aged, maybe 3 times a week but not a meal's worth. :D It does make awesome home made mac-and-cheese though. Far superior to boxed stuff. ;D

Purity corn meal has been an old staple for eons up here. But substitutes we do have and work fine. Speerville is the brand name and it's stone ground and nothing added to it. Can't think it's too difficult to grind corn. :D :D
No cheese made a better grilled cheese sammy than gubbermint cheese.
The peanut butter made a heck of folding choke sammy too.
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Offline 21incher

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #53 on: October 04, 2022, 04:10:19 PM »
Try using a heavyweight vacuum bag pulled to 24 or more inches of vacuum like I said. Nothing will live to chew it's  way out. If your house is infected with the critters they can eat their way in but that is a whole different  problem that you should  get an exterminator to professionally solve so you don't get diseases. Some add an oxygen absorber  to the bag before sealing  and some heat treat also at 140 deg for 2 hours also but it's not necessary to you remove all the oxygen. Freezing will not kill most bugs or eggs so don't  bother trying. If you don't  handle items correctly and constantly  keep an eye on what goes in and out you should not try to store anything. We have stored a lot of food and always bought  bulk over the years and never had one single problem  with bugs or critters.  Stick to cans if you're not going to invest time and energy to prepare  and monitor the process. If you have bugs living in your closets and walls get proper help because it's  not healthy  living  with  them.
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Offline kantuckid

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #54 on: October 05, 2022, 07:54:31 AM »

Does our USA guvment still stockpile butter, etc??  
I thought it was cheese. And I thought the less fortunate didn't want anything to do with it. Who wants to eat cheese every meal? ;D I only want a little bite of hard chedder 5 year aged, maybe 3 times a week but not a meal's worth. :D It does make awesome home made mac-and-cheese though. Far superior to boxed stuff. ;D

Purity corn meal has been an old staple for eons up here. But substitutes we do have and work fine. Speerville is the brand name and it's stone ground and nothing added to it. Can't think it's too difficult to grind corn. :D :D
No cheese made a better grilled cheese sammy than gubbermint cheese.
The peanut butter made a heck of folding choke sammy too.
Some years back they tossed that cheese off the back of a county truck here. We were given some chunks but honestly, I like real cheese, not American Processed pretend cheese. Yer right though, it makes an OK mac & cheese-wife uses Velvetta for GK's who live on that stuff. 
For many years my native KS had commodities as the food stamp program, not retail stamps. There was a "store" at the state fairgrounds in Topeka and other cities around where you filled yer cart with government foods same as school kitchens get-or used to get? Inew to guys who worked for the local gas company and were in lots of homes, they told stories of huge stashes for the foods going to waste. Hundreds of lbs of foods in basements piled high by people who'd take it and then not cook it. Lots of that stuff was also stolen from school kitchens. PB made a great deer bait for one e.g.. 
Hot Rize has the convenience of ingredients already in there, not some special grind. When I first moved here to KY, old timers all grew hickory cane corns for grinding. Pretty much a dead idea now except for a few Eule Gibbon types. :D  
Martha White-it is a SE USA staple food. Grind wise, there are coaser grinds that work better for Masa or other Hispanic ground corns-sort of Polenta style for some, mush for others. My fave is Jalapeo cornbread, peppers, onions and I love the stuff! This summer we began to eat our okra and maters spread onto split cornbread sticks. VG indeeed. 
In KS, my Mom made a more sugary, slightly cakelike cornbread unlike what I eat at home. Bit like Jiffy mix which we sold maybe 5-6 cases a week in KS store I worked in.  
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Offline kantuckid

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #55 on: October 05, 2022, 07:58:04 AM »
Try using a heavyweight vacuum bag pulled to 24 or more inches of vacuum like I said. Nothing will live to chew it's  way out. If your house is infected with the critters they can eat their way in but that is a whole different  problem that you should  get an exterminator to professionally solve so you don't get diseases. Some add an oxygen absorber  to the bag before sealing  and some heat treat also at 140 deg for 2 hours also but it's not necessary to you remove all the oxygen. Freezing will not kill most bugs or eggs so don't  bother trying. If you don't  handle items correctly and constantly  keep an eye on what goes in and out you should not try to store anything. We have stored a lot of food and always bought  bulk over the years and never had one single problem  with bugs or critters.  Stick to cans if you're not going to invest time and energy to prepare  and monitor the process. If you have bugs living in your closets and walls get proper help because it's  not healthy  living  with  them.
We used pros for bugs in a super market, it did help with bugs attracted to shelving but nothing to do with self contained infestation which is different. I suppose it occurs during growing, harvest, or packaging & processing. 
I worked in supermarkets for 5.5 years and saw people bring us buggy foods the entire time. Real happy housewife's :D
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Offline doc henderson

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #56 on: October 05, 2022, 09:30:43 AM »
I bought corn and peanuts to feed squirrels and put it on the back sun porch.  I think they made it into the house from there.  lots of cleaning but they come back.  got rid of a bunch of stuff.  they will not kill if you eat them, but not everyone like a little moth in there diet.
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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #57 on: October 05, 2022, 02:14:16 PM »
Here's the local flour mill. My dad sold them wheat for years when old Stew Flyshacker owned it. He was from Washington State and was also a forester. The corn meal is not ground fine enough for making corn bread without cooking it ahead. It's more of a cereal corn. But I'm not someone who eats corn that way. In fact no one in these parts ever did to my knowledge and I knew lots of depression era folks.  :D

I buy their spelt and buckwheat flours to make my own pancakes. A little baking powder added in by me, and an egg and milk. Olive oil on the cast iron griddle. ;D

https://www.speervilleflourmill.ca/natural-foods/
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Offline taylorsmissbeehaven

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #58 on: October 06, 2022, 07:15:12 AM »
Mary read somewhere to wipe the pantry down with 1 part vinegar and 3 parts water. We did so and had great results. Got a load of hard plastic containers from Amazon this week and will be using them now. Brian
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Offline beenthere

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Re: long term storage of dry goods.
« Reply #59 on: October 06, 2022, 12:34:05 PM »
Quote
We did so and had great results.

Not doubting, but what are you measuring/observing to get "great results"?  
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Last post August 28, 2016, 01:44:19 PM
by caveman
xx
long term storage

Started by 240b on Forestry and Logging

5 Replies
1482 Views
Last post November 15, 2011, 06:11:51 AM
by thecfarm
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Long term storage of Chainsaws

Started by paulpieter on Chainsaws

12 Replies
3651 Views
Last post December 18, 2009, 08:13:39 PM
by paulpieter
xx
Long term lumber storage

Started by Husky546 on Sawmills and Milling

22 Replies
1570 Views
Last post May 25, 2020, 09:36:48 AM
by luap
 


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