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Author Topic: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage  (Read 936 times)

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Offline mike_belben

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2021, 07:58:46 PM »
Im not an authority on who makes what or whats good and whats junk.. All i can say is more and more of everything is from china even if once reputed american brand names are stamped on it.  A lot of that is probably blatant illegal cloning too. 

 I havent had a chicom jug fail yet or be unuseable but some certainly worse than others.  The plating on a hutzl is pretty ugly compared to mahle or husky or stihl genuine.  Youll know the difference when  you put a burr to it and the chicom plating comes right off but the mahle is tough as nails.  


Whatever you do have fun with it.  I miss having one of those 50cc jonskys running.  Fast light limbers. 
Proverbs 19:11

Offline Real1shepherd

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2021, 08:16:36 PM »
It's become a different landscape now, Mike. The Chinese can make anything that the Germans, the Swiss, the Canadians, the Japanese and the US can make.....no doubt about it. But not only do you have price point manufacturing involved, you have politics and human rights issues.

Take Lemforder....once the best aftermarket and factory auto suspension parts maker in the world...German. One day they decided to move their operations mostly to China. Well, the Chinese made parts didn't ruin them, but they're definitely several levels down from what they used to make in Germany.

Is there a moral there? Probably....in that if China can make average parts quality against their price point garbage, maybe the world looks the other way. And the hope is that maybe someday, the world forgets about the quality stuff and chicom is all you're gonna get.

Kevin

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2021, 08:48:41 PM »
Ive had a few engineer friends that have been sent for the US company to china to oversee manufacturing issues. And ive heard that from them too.. China CAN make good parts if you stay ontop of them and are willing to pay.  
Ive also heard from them and others about a lot of spec for no chinese derived steels in a part batch.  I guess they are or were notorious for low electric furnace temps leading to non-homogenous alloying.  Deviation from batch to batch or hardness deviation from end to end, part to part etc.

Case by case basis i guess.  I hate that we are all going poor at home and having to send them our money for their substandard junk because its half price of the real deal that costs 5x more USD than it used to. Or the other side of the coin.. That the pittsburg ratchet is better than the craftsman, for less. 
Proverbs 19:11

Offline Real1shepherd

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2021, 10:11:01 AM »
Yes, that's the conundrum;keeping their feet to the fire on quality production and starting with the best steels.

If you're a manufacturer, you HAVE to send your best quality control people over there and oversee the whole process. And that requires your people to live over there.....which isn't the most attractive, freedom loving place in the world.

Harbor Freight ICON tools are beating and out spec-ing Snap On.....pretty sad when I have to consider HF for buying quality tools. Chicom parts are even finding their way into commercial aircraft....that's a scary thought when you think of their 'hit & miss' quality standard record.

Kevin

Offline steele109

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2021, 01:52:43 PM »
Hi I don't mean to step on anybody's toes by joining the conversation. There is a way to help the muffler bolt problem,buy a 346 muffler support bracket. Cut the outside leg off put on heat the saw up and retighten the muffler.Haven't had a screw back out since I started doing them this way.Now back to your regular scheduled program.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2021, 10:30:14 PM »
Good idea.  


You can also put a little crimp across the thread tops by wacking the bolts with a sharp chisel lengthwise.  Not too much, you dont want the steel to eat the aluminum threads.  Just enough for the screws to bind up a bit and kinda make it a higher thread fit class. 

 loctite them too.  
Proverbs 19:11

Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2021, 01:53:33 PM »
Well just an update. The parts came and I finally had time Friday to start putting it back together. I mentioned how that went in the 'did something dumb' thread. So I went out to visit Spike60 he he hooked me up with a replacement ring. When I got back to it on Saturday I put it back together I only had one screw left over. :D :D
 But it still doesn't have the compression it should. It has spark and is getting gas. I am not really a 2 cycle guy and I don't really understand how these things cycle through a stroke. My understanding is that the entire crankcase is pressurized, but I don't understand why. If that is the case, it may be leaking out the bottom around the crank seals. Is that possible? Well the goal here was to learn something and I guess I will learn some more. I'll let it sit for a little more, then tear it apart again.
 Any suggestions?
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2021, 02:27:53 PM »
When the piston rises it is compression above and suction below.  Just flip it upside down mentally, the piston rising toward the plug is a compression stroke above the piston and a simultaneous intake stroke below the piston.  Its sucking charge in.  The intake manifold aims into the crankcase BELOW the piston skirt.  The piston skirt length top and bottom makes up the valve timing. 


Plug fires, bang, piston descends from the plug, reveals the exhaust port then the tops of the transfer ports and now the bottom of the piston plunges down into the crankcase, forcing mixture from below the piston, up and around to the top.  Thats why pro saws have windows in the sides of the skirt.  The piston sorta has two tops.  


Its a 4 stroke with siamesed steps doing 2 simultaneous processes.. Hence a 2stroke.  Thats why they go bump bump.   Bump bump.  Bump bump like a harley.  Well.. A harley does it because of V rods and the jug geometry.  A saw does it because there are two different compressions.  One below, then one above.


When you cut the jug, your second bump gets harder.  When you epoxy the extra space in the block, your first one does too.


Crank seals are subject to positive and negative pulsations. Once up to speed a column of inertia will probably switch the aggregate atmosphere in the base to pretty much all pressurized.  Either there air ramming in or piston coming down.  No time for vacuum. Thats my guess. 
Proverbs 19:11

Offline Spike60

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2021, 05:46:28 AM »
An air leak from something like the crank seals would cause running issues, but it's not enough of a leak where you'd be able to feel a lack of compression like you do when pulling over a saw without a spark plug in it.

In my experience, the majority of aftermarket kits are low on compression out of the box. They don't have enough "squish" from the factory. Sometimes a gasket delete will raise it up enough to be useable.
Husqvarna-Jonsered
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2021, 08:12:51 AM »
Thanks Bob, I will give that a try first. I did note that the new gasket seems I tad thicker than the OEM, but never thought to measure it. I am thinking there may be another leak some where and I may not have found the original problem that you had diagnosed whenever you looked at this one. The owner said "something about the lower end" but he couldn't remember the details. This is just an educational project for me as I obviously don't know enough about them and could always use a little more schooling. I'll keep poking along, remove the gasket and re-check my other work and try again. I also have that one leftover screw which is short (1/2") and about the size of a #12 that I can't find a home for so I need to figure that out also. The shop manual could be better for this saw.  ;D
Tom Lindtveit, Woodsman Forest Products
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) Retired and trying to make a living to stay that way. NYLT Certified.
OK, maybe I am the woodcutter now.
I can work with wood, but I am NOT a Woodworker, yet.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2021, 11:17:15 AM »
the "easiest" if not only way to find a leak, is to build a rig to pressure and vacuum test the saw.  you need a blockoff for the exhaust and the intake with carb removed.  then a compression tester adapter to thread into the plug hole.  and a way to draw and meaasure vacuum as well as positive pressure to see that both hold.  you can submerge with pressure to find the leak obviously.  it is a chore.  i havent found my rig or blockoff plates from the move and have just said nah to starting over. 

innertube rubber scrap makes good gaskets to seal the metal blankoff plates
Proverbs 19:11

Online HemlockKing

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Re: Another Husqvarna 350 to salvage
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2021, 12:58:23 PM »
Ive had a few engineer friends that have been sent for the US company to china to oversee manufacturing issues. And ive heard that from them too.. China CAN make good parts if you stay ontop of them and are willing to pay.  
Ive also heard from them and others about a lot of spec for no chinese derived steels in a part batch.  I guess they are or were notorious for low electric furnace temps leading to non-homogenous alloying.  Deviation from batch to batch or hardness deviation from end to end, part to part etc.

Case by case basis i guess.  I hate that we are all going poor at home and having to send them our money for their substandard junk because its half price of the real deal that costs 5x more USD than it used to. Or the other side of the coin.. That the pittsburg ratchet is better than the craftsman, for less.
Sure the products are cheaper... but all the jobs are going over seas, not exactly great for your own economy stimulation except for big corps who sell out the work to some Chinese/North Korean children in a sweat shop. Ive been trying to avoid made in China for the last 5 years or so. Its hard but Im willing to pay for quality, not only that but I see China as a threat to our way of life over here. They are trying to expand influence, my government is infiltrated by Chinese money, they sell out their own people and land so China can exploit us and profit. The fisheries come to mind too, in the last 10 years they have all been bought up by Chinese wealthy. 


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