The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Feeding young specimen trees?  (Read 1402 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline scgargoyle

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1025
  • Age: 69
  • Location: South Carolina
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Feeding young specimen trees?
« on: February 10, 2016, 11:37:39 AM »
As part of playing around on our property, I have planted a few trees for diversity and because there are certain trees I like that I don't have on the property. So far, I've planted a beech, redbud, red maple (cultivar) and a Norway Spruce. All of them are surviving, but not growing much. Our soil is very poor red clay. Will it help much to feed the trees? I'd like to optimize growth, and give them the best shot at being good-looking trees. I'm old, and don't have time to just wait! :D
I hope my ship comes in before the dock rots!

Offline Texas Ranger

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 7861
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Livingston, Texas, God's Country
  • Gender: Male
  • Texan, by God and by choice.
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2016, 02:26:37 PM »
I would hazard a guess a yearly deep watering with water/fertilizer mix would not hurt.
The Ranger, home of Texas Forestry

Offline AfraidChocker

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • AfraidChocker: Get it, "A Frayed Chocker"
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2016, 06:32:20 PM »
In Maine the big big paper mills fussed around with fertilizing some of their forest land with urea with good results, but that was when the price of it was very favorable. I seriously doubt any one is getting good results with it now due to the high costs of urea.

I have noticed that there is no way I can keep up with the growth along our fields however; on the down hill sides especially. The question still remains, is all the fertilizer (cow manure and urea) going into the crop ground running down into the forest and getting really good growth, or has over time, the good soil migrated there over a few centuries of farming and that is what is causing phenomenal growth?
As a sheep farmer, I have no intentions of arriving at the pearly gates in a well preserved body, rather I am going to slide into heaven sideways with my Kubota tractor, kick the manure out of my muck boots, and loudly proclaim, "Whoo Hoo, another Sheppard has just arrived!"

Offline Lnewman

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 121
  • Location: Marion Twp, Butler County, PA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 01:12:57 AM »
How big are the trees now?
Stihl 170, 210MS, 290MS, 441MS and Hudson bandsaw

Offline AfraidChocker

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • AfraidChocker: Get it, "A Frayed Chocker"
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 07:05:07 AM »
One of the interesting things about forests and fertilizer is nitrogen fixation. A forester could explain this better than me, but having done a lot of forests-into-field conversions I have noticed this phenomenon. That is, after forest is cleared into field, without a LOT of fertilizer it is almost impossible to get good yield (tonnage to the acre). That is because of all the woody debris still in the soil. What is happening is, the breakdown of that woody debris robs the soil of nitrogen that cannot be given to the plant (mostly corn in my case). In order to beat that, I must apply a lot of fertilizer to overcome that lack of nitrogen to get any measurable crop.

At least for the first 7 years.

After about 7 years, the woody debris has mostly been consumed and that nitrogen is now fixed in the soil and ready to be absorbed. So after seven years or so, it takes very little fertilizer to get the same yield per acre, and that too lasts about seven years before the soil becomes depleted and higher amounts of fertilizer must be added to get the same results.

It is a unique cycle that you can really work with as a farmer. Knowing that in the first few years of a forest cleared into field, I will need lots of fertilizer, I can sow it into grass and just pasture the marginalized crop with little fertilizer inputs, then in the 7th year; knowing the nitrogen levels will be staggering, I could grow crops requiring high nitrogen like potatoes or corn. For the unaware farmer however, expecting great crops after forest conversion, many are dismayed at the dismal yield.

Now this is just fertilizer. Naturally it takes a lot of lime to get a former forest turned field from acidic soil to neutral soil for optimum growth.
As a sheep farmer, I have no intentions of arriving at the pearly gates in a well preserved body, rather I am going to slide into heaven sideways with my Kubota tractor, kick the manure out of my muck boots, and loudly proclaim, "Whoo Hoo, another Sheppard has just arrived!"

Offline AfraidChocker

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • AfraidChocker: Get it, "A Frayed Chocker"
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2016, 07:20:47 AM »
I just thought about this too.

I have a friend who is working with the Maine Forest Service to introduce blight resistant Chestnut Trees back into the state, and he too uses urea to fertilize his trees.

BTW: When I said I could not keep up with the trees on the edges of my fields, it was in reference to saplings and pole trees that grow up and throw their limbs out into the fields which can bust out tractor windows or encroach on crops. I was in no way implying that these trees grow to marketability that quick.

They do grow quicker then their in-the-woods siblings, but it can be attributed to many things: better soil, sunshine, or fertilized roots from cow manure or urea.
As a sheep farmer, I have no intentions of arriving at the pearly gates in a well preserved body, rather I am going to slide into heaven sideways with my Kubota tractor, kick the manure out of my muck boots, and loudly proclaim, "Whoo Hoo, another Sheppard has just arrived!"

Offline thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 33258
  • Age: 61
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2016, 08:00:16 PM »
On the limbs growing into a field,because they can!!!    ;D I keep up on about a 1000 feet and than another field up in the woods. One year I got back the limbs and gave them to the goats. They like the maple the best. After a few days of doing this they would get all excited to see me coming with the brush.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline Dobie

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 56
  • Location: nw PA
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Feeding young specimen trees?
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2016, 12:00:12 AM »
I know of people who plant legumes such as clover or alfalfa to help fix nitrogen in the ground around trees.  We do this in our apple orchards and saw a very good results with our young trees.


If you have a rototiller and till in the clover once or twice a year, you should get an extra 200 lbs of nitrogen/acre per till.  The clover will come back up and you just repeat.





Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
when do we prune young trees ?

Started by roger 4400 on Ask The Forester

10 Replies
2521 Views
Last post May 31, 2010, 08:14:03 PM
by Pilot1
xx
Are these young pawpaw trees?

Started by wareagle on Tree, Plant and Wood I.D.

4 Replies
663 Views
Last post June 11, 2022, 08:03:37 PM
by wareagle
xx
trees and bees, can it pay to plant cover crops in young forests?

Started by eastcoastbeek on Alternative methods and solutions

38 Replies
5574 Views
Last post April 07, 2018, 07:59:22 PM
by ESFted
xx
Feeding the 'pet' Eel

Started by Ianab on The Outdoor Board

19 Replies
4853 Views
Last post October 15, 2018, 07:29:14 PM
by Southside
 


Powered by EzPortal