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1
General Board / Re: Making it through another year '21-'22

« Last post by Old Greenhorn on Today at 07:02:30 PM »
Thanks for the thoughts fellas. I got a phone call today from the guy that is the owner/ creator/Director of the Woodstock Luthiers show. He is also a musician who has played with Michael countless times and we are all in that same circle of friends. He was really broken up as he just got the news today. He was in tears, which got me in tears and I think he may have been having a few drinks to soften the blow. It's a hard hit as the news gets out around a 4 town area.
-------------------------------
 Today I just buried myself in work. Was at it in the shop by 8:30, skipped breakfast until noon. The glue-up on the bench turned out just fine, but getting it to sit flat is always a challenge. The last two I was able to tweak in with some creative belt sanding. This one has a very slight twist in the top and with everything else being square and true, that twist shows up where the legs meet the floor. It was too much to sand out, about 1/4". So I laid out a line on one leg that should have matched the other leg. The question was, how to cut that line. So I did a little table length mod on my RAS and this is what I came up with.




 

 That allowed me to run the saw blade over the cut and line it all up, then add 2 more clamps, lower the blade, and cut it.
 Worked like a charm, just nailed it.  Accidents happen, right? So after that I put in an hour or so doing the final shape sanding for corners, etc, then did a 1st pass finish sand. It doesn't look bad.



 

 Then I set it up to do the fillet pours on the leg to seat joint. For these I have to get each 90° joint line level and dam the ends, then pour the fillet. I can only do one at a time. As it happened I also had one live edge to seat joints at the right angle, so I could get that one as a bonus on this pour. It's a funky setup.


 

 I can really only do one edge per day, but as I did this one around mid-morning, after I finish this post I am going to go out and see if I can get one more in tonight and save a day. But that has set there all day curing and I used the leftover epoxy to add to the bar and included part of that snake shed skin, about 4" with the head, in the 'pond' area. It will be 'submerged' when all is done. I don't know if it will even be visible as more than a blurry object.

 Then I turned back to stool legs and I used the jointer to square up the old legs I found before I took all the legs upstairs to the table router. I set up a 45° bit and made hexes out of all the legs. SO I wound up with a nice little pile.


 

 Then another flurry of looking for stuff ensued as I could not find my big 5/8" drill and thought somebody borrowed it without asking. Finally located it, tried it on a test leg and still not happy with the results. So I drilled a test hole in a block and took the leg over to the belt sander and started 'whittling it down' and making it round. Not too hard to get it to fit right and be square in the hole. Then I moved to the bandsander and did the transition radius to look a bit smoother. Since these are for short stools, I want the legs square and solid. I can clamp them square when glued. The test was a self declared success.

 I had wanted to get to the mill today, but I just got on a roll and wanted to keep it going. I'll get there tomorrow. Right now I am going to head and get one more joint curing.

 Tomorrow is...
2
The Outdoor Board / Re: Did You know - outdoor edition

« Last post by ellmoe on Today at 06:51:43 PM »
Going back to elevated hunting stands, I have determined to make one out of the old sawver's box from a now scrapped Frick Timber Tiger mill I had. It is the perfect size, metal body, with a solid roof, window openings on the sides and a door in the back. I'll have to replace the windows with some kind of sliders, but that should be all. I'll also need a machine to lift it in the air. I do believe it will be the only mill cab converted to such duty.
3
Forestry and Logging / Re: Some more NZ log trucks.

« Last post by Resonator on Today at 06:51:25 PM »
If those are company trucks I would guess fuel economy is a higher priority than horsepower. I drove for big fleets with lower HP engines and restricted speeds, where I knew I'd get there, but I wouldn't get there fast. ;D
4
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by chet on Today at 06:46:00 PM »
More so than frozen logs, snow and cold, it's the lack of daylight hours this time of year that gits me.   :(  
5
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by ladylake on Today at 06:41:22 PM »

 Ho do we know when a log is half frozen?  Steve
6
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by Resonator on Today at 06:39:08 PM »
Looking at the WM site, 4°, 7°, and 10° are all close in price, I may try a couple individual blades and see if it makes a difference. 
Has anyone tried carbides on frozen logs? They cost 3 times as much, but they say it can "withstand the hardest of hardwoods and provide a very smooth finish".
7
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Woodlands sharpener = uhg…

« Last post by MattM on Today at 06:29:58 PM »
You cannot have this sharpener push on the tooth being sharpened it needs to push as it sharpens so if you do that you will just grind the pusher. You should have it pushing the tooth to the right of the one being sharpened. In your picture it looks like you have it two teeth to the right.

Something else that I found helped make the Grindlux sharpener run more smoothly is to take a file and get rid of the sharp edges on all the sheet mettle that the blade touches and make everything smooth.
Do this to the blade clamp and the support arms.

Also don't determine how much to grind by the woodland YouTube videos or other YouTube videos. Most people posting videos on YouTube for this are new to sharpening and try to make it seem like they're experts. Do the lightest grind possible and do multiple if you have too. It's a pain at approx 18-20 mins per band just grind time, but it's what you have to do if you don't want to ruin bands.

Make sure there is no pitch or dirt on the face or gullet of your teeth, this will make your sharpening very inconsistent as the push arm pushes against the buildup instead of the tooth.

If you want this grinder to grind more of the gullet then take off the little adjustable piece that the rod that lifts the head up and down sits on. Drill and tap a new hole to the left of the current hole and install the adjustable piece further to the left.

One last thing... The grinder comes with (or at least mone did) a little metal piece to show how to profile your stone. I didn't find it that good for grinding. You need your stone slightly round on the left side and the corner taken off the right side. Look up the videos by Cooks on how to profile their stones to get an idea on the shape. Even though there stones are a lot wider the idea is the same.

I had one of these for 6years, it's definitely a hobby sharpener but at the time it was the best I could get here in eastern Canada. Is slow as molasses and you definitely don't want to have to do more than a few blades on it at a time.... I've had many multi day sharpening sessions FML. Now with the BMS 250 I can do more in a half hour, including setup time than what I did in a day  8)
The push rod pushed on the tooth being sharpened, then backs up and catch the next tooth as the wheel comes down and grinds the face and gullet.  So it is pushing the tooth that is getting sharpend .  Steve
If that's the case they must've changed the cam profile on the woodland mills sharpener since I bought mine. On mine you couldn't push the tooth that was being sharpened as the pusher is pushing as the gullet is getting ground. That's what makes this sharpener so inconsistent compared to other sharpeners that push the actual tooth that is being sharpened.
8
General Board / Re: The Score Of The Day Thread

« Last post by SawyerTed on Today at 06:27:14 PM »
For whatever reason, I don’t often “score” a good deal on used or new stuff.  I usually come about items at standard prices.  But this time I think I did pretty well…

10 hp Woodmaster 718 10” planer/molder with rotary phase converter and a dozen molder blades/sets for $1,000. He threw in a router table and Makita router.  The 718 needs a few minor repair parts and some TLC.  Woodmaster still supports the 718 with parts. It has the mounts for the two routers for 3 side molding. 

A Rockwell 3 hp shaper with 3/4” spindle two fences and several cutter sets including 3 raised panel bit sets, a tongue and groove set, and a tongue and groove with bevel edge set.  At $600 I’m happy.  A good router and table would come close to that.  

The rotary phase converter can run either machine.  I probably don’t have the juice to run both at the same time (it is not likely anyway). 


 
 

 

 
9
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by Andries on Today at 05:45:51 PM »
Way to go MM, keep pushing back on that rocking chair talk. 👍
Resonator, a 10° band might be too aggressive in frozen maple with a 19 hp motor. Barbender has a Lombardini diesel with turbo 7s and I’ve got 26hp on 4° bands, in oak. @boonesyard might add to this discussion, with his LT50 experience near Fargo ND. 
.
Given a well aligned mill, a nice flat cut needs a match between blade speed and blade sharp-ness. Frozen wood dulls my bands faster. 
10
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by thecfarm on Today at 05:43:53 PM »
I sure am no expert, but sawed hemlock in Feb once. 10° blade did it for me.
11
Forestry and Logging / Re: couple pics... post what your currently cutting

« Last post by ehp on Today at 05:43:15 PM »
white red maple pays better than red oak, hickory or ash here 
12
Did you order it as chassis cab? What size is the fuel tank? 
Whats the GVWR?
13
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Woodlands sharpener = uhg…

« Last post by ladylake on Today at 05:17:46 PM »
You cannot have this sharpener push on the tooth being sharpened it needs to push as it sharpens so if you do that you will just grind the pusher. You should have it pushing the tooth to the right of the one being sharpened. In your picture it looks like you have it two teeth to the right.

Something else that I found helped make the Grindlux sharpener run more smoothly is to take a file and get rid of the sharp edges on all the sheet mettle that the blade touches and make everything smooth.
Do this to the blade clamp and the support arms.

Also don't determine how much to grind by the woodland YouTube videos or other YouTube videos. Most people posting videos on YouTube for this are new to sharpening and try to make it seem like they're experts. Do the lightest grind possible and do multiple if you have too. It's a pain at approx 18-20 mins per band just grind time, but it's what you have to do if you don't want to ruin bands.

Make sure there is no pitch or dirt on the face or gullet of your teeth, this will make your sharpening very inconsistent as the push arm pushes against the buildup instead of the tooth.

If you want this grinder to grind more of the gullet then take off the little adjustable piece that the rod that lifts the head up and down sits on. Drill and tap a new hole to the left of the current hole and install the adjustable piece further to the left.

One last thing... The grinder comes with (or at least mone did) a little metal piece to show how to profile your stone. I didn't find it that good for grinding. You need your stone slightly round on the left side and the corner taken off the right side. Look up the videos by Cooks on how to profile their stones to get an idea on the shape. Even though there stones are a lot wider the idea is the same.

I had one of these for 6years, it's definitely a hobby sharpener but at the time it was the best I could get here in eastern Canada. Is slow as molasses and you definitely don't want to have to do more than a few blades on it at a time.... I've had many multi day sharpening sessions FML. Now with the BMS 250 I can do more in a half hour, including setup time than what I did in a day  8)
 The push rod pushed on the tooth being sharpened, then backs up and catch the next tooth as the wheel comes down and grinds the face and gullet.  So it is pushing the tooth that is getting sharpend .  Steve
14
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by Magicman on Today at 05:07:20 PM »
before you trade in your rider seat for a rockin' chair
Funny you should mention the seat because...



FedEx just delivered this Brand New Operator's Seat yesterday.  I will install it Tuesday.   :)
15
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Useful sawmill mods

« Last post by Andries on Today at 05:06:59 PM »
Yikes, one tough little piece of wood next to the belt, and then the train wreck. 
Good to see you keepin’ after it Peter. 👌
16
We don’t have red maple here just silver maple which is mostly always wormy. Up till a few years ago
There want much demand for
Soft maple. Last few years it’s got way better for table tops. Wormier the better 🤦🏽‍♂️. Then it got even better for
Lumber. Now lumber market fell
Way off so it’s  back to table
Tops.
17
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by Resonator on Today at 04:47:02 PM »
Quote
Maybe move this topic to "Did something dumb today".   (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)  (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)  (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Seriously, you glaciated guys have my admiration. 
I still want to get way down south and see you saw Mr. Mississippi Magic Man before you trade in your rider seat for a rockin' chair. ;D
18
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Home made slabbing mill

« Last post by scsmith42 on Today at 04:44:07 PM »
Thanks for the info, if you don’t mind a few more ?
You seem to use a single v belt for the drive, is that enough, or would 2 be better?
What diameter pulley on the electrical clutch? And what size pulley on the end of the drive shaft?
Your sawchain tensioning system seems to be intended to put some tension in the bar to help with any downward bowing, have you thought of using a steel rail parallel with the rail.
Also seen free hanging welding magnets fixed to  hand winches, just to support guidebar as it enters the log, and to support the section of bar not in the log.
Have you used water free flowing on the bar, purely as a coolant role? And finally have you used some form of garden sprayer to oil the bar, so with a few pumps the oil pipe feed has a positive pressure to help with lubrication?
Sorry for all the questions, but if you don’t ask. You don’t learn
I had a Peterson wpf for a few years but have built a much heavier frame out of steel section
1. You seem to use a single v belt for the drive, is that enough, or would 2 be better?
One belt has been adequate.

2. What diameter pulley on the electrical clutch? And what size pulley on the end of the drive shaft?
The real question that you need to ask yourself is what chain speed do you want to have.  Calculate the pulley sizes in order to achieve the chain speed at a given engine RPM.  I started off with 6000 rpm chain speed, and had a real problem with chain stretch.  I'm down to around 3,600 rpm now but still playing with it.
If I had it to do over again I would eliminate the electric clutch and go with a manual belt tensioning design to disengage the chain.  Simpler, and less hassle to maintain.  I'm on my 3rd electric clutch...

3. Your sawchain tensioning system seems to be intended to put some tension in the bar to help with any downward bowing, have you thought of using a steel rail parallel with the rail.
Not yet.  If I were building it again today, I would choose a different bar that is wider.  The wider bar would resist sagging more than my narrow one, and allow a wider selection of drive sprockets.  However back when I built this one there weren't many choices for long bars.

Also seen free hanging welding magnets fixed to  hand winches, just to support guidebar as it enters the log, and to support the section of bar not in the log.

4. Have you used water free flowing on the bar, purely as a coolant role? And finally have you used some form of garden sprayer to oil the bar, so with a few pumps the oil pipe feed has a positive pressure to help with lubrication?
No to both.  The oil feed has proven adequate.  There are many, many hundreds of hours of use on the slabbing mill and I'm still on my original bar.

Sorry for all the questions, but if you don’t ask. You don’t learn
I had a Peterson wpf for a few years but have built a much heavier frame out of steel section
19
Sawmills and Milling / Re: Frozen Millers

« Last post by Resonator on Today at 04:43:28 PM »
Well here's the situation... I've had a few recent inquiries about doing sawing, and have at least 1 small job for a repeat customer to finish in the next couple weeks. I'd like to keep sawing at least until it gets really cold (well below zero), especially if I have customers calling.
When it gets 22° below, then they call for firewood. Those calls go like: "Hey you got any left!? I need it bad! I got cash!";D

I'm not worried about frozen sawdust on the boards, I run hot water and pine sol as long as I can get away with it. A little warmth and a drywall knife will fix frozen sawdust. ;)

What I'm shooting for is FLAT cuts, I keep a 4' level by the mill and check the cuts as I go. Worst logs I have are 20"+ sugar maple with the watery sap. I tried cutting one right above the pith, and it bogged the engine down and cut waves bad. Same size log in summer, no problem. I've found if I break them down into smaller cants, then the mill cuts much better (flatter). (Maybe the 19HP is more able to overcome the ice then). I read frozen logs will dull the blade much faster too, wondering if you guys have to change out more often it the cold?
One thing I did try was kind of the opposite of full freeze, I had a bonfire going and left some logs next to it for hours, turning them a couple times. It at least thawed the outer bark and sapwood, and got the ice and snow off.
20
Forestry and Logging / Re: White Pine

« Last post by Clark on Today at 04:39:12 PM »
That's how it is in the local market here too. #1 and #2 pine saw logs are both $400 and S/F down to 5" is $500.

gg

So what you’re saying is you are sitting on a gold mine?  :D

Clark
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