The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Ash?  (Read 406 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sum1

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Ash?
« on: January 06, 2021, 09:13:30 PM »
I grew up in an area with no ash trees so I'm not sure how to identify them.

Pictures are from Manitoba Canada. I'm thinking it's an ash tree of some sort? 

What's an easy way to identify black poplar(cottonwood) from ash in the winner time the bark kind of looks the same to me.

 

 

 

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 39091
  • Age: 53
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Ash?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2021, 04:18:39 AM »
That is a willow, I see willow leaves. Long slender, pointy. :)

Balm-of-Gilead, Balsam Poplar have sticky buds, that have an aromatic resin. Branch tips are very flexible and bend easy. Alternate branching. Twigs round in cross section. Leaves ovate shape base up to a pointed tip. Smooth grey-green bark young, becoming orange and furrowed at old age.

eastern cottonwood have slightly sticky buds, twigs not round in cross section. Triangular shape leaves. Grey bark young become deeply furrowed.

Ash have blunt terminal buds with 2 large leaf scars below, branch tips are stout and stiff. Opposite branching and open. Compound leaf with many leaflets up the main axis, with terminal leaflet. Brown bark, becoming rough at a young age.


One of my most cherished books.

Native Trees of Canada
No amount of belief makes something a fact. James Randi

Offline firefighter ontheside

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2394
  • Age: 47
  • Location: DeSoto MO
  • Gender: Male
  • I like trees.
    • Share Post
Re: Ash?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2021, 05:30:53 PM »
My thought was willow when I looked at the bark.
Woodmizer LT15
Kubota Grand L4200
Stihl 025 and MS291
2017 F350 Diesel 4WD
Kawasaki Mule 4010

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 39091
  • Age: 53
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Ash?
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2021, 05:38:19 PM »
Most our willow up around here are the size of small alders. Bark gets rough, but not big enough to get deep furrows. You get one once in awhile the size of small aspen, but no bark that rough, but same pattern to the bark though. The moose destroy them, quite literally before they can get very big. They will ruin an entire grove, breaking them in half. Young moose I think need it if I recall.
No amount of belief makes something a fact. James Randi

Offline mmtrees

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 20
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Brantford
  • Gender: Male
  • There's no time for later
    • Share Post
    • M & M Tree Service
Re: Ash?
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2021, 11:15:47 AM »
Salix alba 'Tristis' - Weeping Golden Willow?


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter
 


Powered by EzPortal