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Author Topic: Wiring a TF or Log Home  (Read 10851 times)

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Offline anvil

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2007, 07:38:29 PM »
Thehardsway,,

Thanks much for posting my pics..

Yup,, this is my new shop nearly done, believe it or not,  I send him some more pics that should show things a bit better.

anvil

Offline Thehardway

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2007, 08:30:26 PM »
Ok , here are the rest of the picture anvil sent me.
 



 



Norwood LM2000 24HP w/28' bed, Hudson Oscar 18" 32' bed, Woodmaster 718 planer,  Kubota L185D, Stihl 029, Husqvarna 550XP

Offline logwalker

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2007, 08:59:22 PM »
Anvil, that is an ambitious project. Are you going to be closed in by winter? And what is the story on the large bandsaw in the background. Joe
Let's all be careful out there tomorrow. Lt40hd, 22' Kenworth Flatbed rollback dump, MM45B Mitsubishi trackhoe, Clark5000lb Forklift, Kubota L2850 tractor

Offline beenthere

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2007, 10:31:48 PM »
Anvil
What can you tell us about the logs you are using, as shown in your pics? Did you use the muriatic acid treatment on them to get the weathered look, or are they old logs? 

Also, a comment about the low header and the size of the logs...just curious.  ;D

Where ya building at?
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline anvil

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2007, 01:03:14 AM »
beenthere,,

The logs ar ponderosa.. all materials came from the property,so I am dealing with what i have locally..  :D  part of the dream.  I peeled them about two years ago, so the color is natural, which is what I wanted. I do know how to color logs,, muriatic will lighten them, but if you  dissolve iron filings in the acid,, you can darken them as well. I don't want to do this,, but play with the colors as they are.. with some yellow logs on the top for accents.   

Hehe,, the low header is an optical illusion due to the size of the logs and rocks.  the height to the bottom of the header is about 8'6" and inside opening is about 12'.  the butts of the logs are around 20".

I am located just west of Colorado Springs,Colorado

logwalker,,

that it is,, an ambitious project,, It has been in the planning for about 4 years. I spent the first year hauling rocks and logs,, the next year I excavated the site and put in the footer. 

I was going to just blaze off the ground but hit three springs.  So I took it down 2'. then I hit another spring nearly dead center in the shopspace,,so put in a french drain on the diagonal and filled it with decomposed gravel.  I still had a water problem, so put another french drain at the top of the foundation and tied it into the lower one at the southeast corner.

the excavation was the prime expense,, the d&g came from the site.

Late last summer i started the stone work,,around august and had to quit mid november due to cold.  Then the winter snows came and i began to dig out. 

Oh,, yea,, the shop is 20' x 40' and a shed roof with a pitch to match an existing old shed just behind the bandsaw.

anyway,, i dug out the shop and logs and moved the goalpost logs into the center and began to put them together,, my first attempt at a mortis\tenon\cope combination.  everything has been done pretty much Egyptian style,,comealongs,block and tackle, a wood platform and 1" pipe for rollers.  the first side took me two months,,the second took two weeks,,and i think i could do the whole deal in a two - three week timeframe now. We erected the doorbucks in August,,and i jumped back onto the stonework. 

I ran into a time problem,, sheesh,, a very insistent, but patient customer with a job... So my good friend Mark came aboard to do the stack logs.  I am finishing the stone during the week, and when he comes up , we are doing the rest of the logwork. He is pictured setting the log on the other page.  Pay attention to his notches btw,, and see if you can figure out just what is going on...   ;) 

we will finish the last front log,, seen on the left with the tripod in place,,and the first fit in the pics on the other page.  Then we will put up the "Big Kahuha"!!  It is a 50' 24" butt that will sit on top of the goalpost,, then the four main rafters will be notched in with temp notches,, and a large tarp will be put up.  I will begin setting up my shop,,and we will have a place out of the weather to do the rest of the logs and iron. 

The plan,, is to be operational as a blacksmith shop in a few weeks,,and pretty much finished by the first of the year.  truth be known,, once I have my forge,anvil and power hammer set up,, time is not a priority,, but still looking to be pretty done by the first of the year. 

The bandsaw is pat. pending 1900 and a machinist friend rebuild it a few years ago.  It is a great tool,, has a 48" dia set of wheels and with  bit bigger motor and another pulley,, will work for metal or wood into the future,, but now,, it is a metal bandsaw,,and just sweet to work...

When i get my main computer back on line,  i will put up some pics of my other tools,, my camelback drill press is the same vintage,,and rebuild by the same man.

I cannot speak high enough of Mark,, just a fine craftsman.  We have been working on the design over many cups of coffee,,and a huge amount of BS,,, hehe,, and both of us are really excited over just how it is turning out. 

Logs are so cool,, and the details are beginning to emerge,, check out his pic,,and the knots on the vert buck and the log he is setting.  I am going to run the stone behind these four knots so they will be visible on the inside of the shop. 

This is my first major project where i am combining stone,iron, and log.  the iron is not easy to see,, as it gets buried,,but I have hand forged all the "J"bolts and counter sunk square washers as an example.  I made all my stone tools,, trowels, and whatever else the others are called,,  ;D,, I'm a blacksmith,,not a stonemason!!  but i am a toolmaker.

I cannot begin to tell you just how satifsying it is to use these tools on a daily basis,,and see this stonework rise from the ground...

I built a log house a few years ago,, nearly as nice as this,, not quite,, and came up with this design for the log dogs.  the design is not fluff and stuff but all very functional. I have used the typical square bar\rebar with welded on legs,,and they are just a pain in the butt!!  So this design makes them a joy to work,, the taper from the center,,and the curve make it so a light tap in the center sets the dog,,and creates a spring action to secure the dog in both logs,, one light blow,,and you are done,, tap it sideways,,and it pops loose. no more hit one end,,and the other pops loose,,or hit it in the middle ands both ends go wherever  they danged well want!! 

I have been saying for the last month,,that i will be done with the stonework in two or three weeks,, still got two or three weeks to go,, and its getting cold!!  I have a thermal blanket,,but don't want to put any additives into the mud.  so the pressure is definitely on... so back at it tomorrow.  today i picked up a couple hundred pounds of quartz,, to highlight the stone here and there on the last corner... 

anvil       

Offline scsmith42

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #25 on: November 10, 2007, 12:53:04 PM »
Anvil - that is a superb looking project.  The craftsmanship on those notches is really good.  Please keep us posted with pictures and details!

Scott
Peterson 10" WPF with 65' of track
Smith - Gallagher dedicated slabber
Tom's 3638D Baker band mill
and a mix of log handling heavy equipment.

Offline Don P

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2007, 10:30:54 PM »
That is some nice log, iron and stonework.. that's 3 nice materials  8).

This is a shot of what I did where some plumbing came down from a bathroom above.




The future is a foreign country, they will do things differently there - Simon Winchester

Offline scsmith42

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2007, 10:41:25 PM »
Don, that's a good idea.  I think that I'll copy it...

Scott
Peterson 10" WPF with 65' of track
Smith - Gallagher dedicated slabber
Tom's 3638D Baker band mill
and a mix of log handling heavy equipment.

Offline anvil

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2007, 08:51:03 AM »
scsmith42,,

Thanks,,and I will as progress is made. I am putting in the main breaker today.. progress

Don.  aswsome job.. Its nice when the end product looks like it ought to be there,,instead of how it was..

anvil

Offline bman

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2007, 02:04:28 PM »
Great topic Bob. I am coming up to start to figure some of this too.
I am doing full exposed posts/beams and likely SIPS so it is a wonder to me too. I will likely do my walls with vertical pine first.  I had it suggested that the wiring be bundled together and tacked at agreed height to the outside of the posts and they could notch out the foam/single layer osb SIPS to mount over it.
That seems ok but the part I need to start looking at is the hanging lights, ceiling fans, plasma TV, surround sound, etc.
I know there has to be 8 different ways to do it so thanks for starting this thread Bob !!
Mark

Couple of things to keep in mind; NEC states that cables and conductors that are bundled together (more than three current carrying conductors) are subject to derating factors (essentially lowers the load capacity of the individual conductors) and although I've seen it done a million times there are some anal inspectors that will call you on it. The other thing is to be very certain about maintaining the integrity of the cable sheath when routing around corners or thru/under shallow covered chases. If a screw or staple nicks a conductor it could still be electrically conductive but at a reduced ampacity. What this means is that if that wire carry’s your lighting load for say a couple of rooms then the damaged area of the conductor (reduced cross section) will be susceptible to over heating. Once it starts to heat it sets off a cycle of heating, increased resistance, more heat, more resistance until it reaches the flash point for the material it is fastened next to (timber frame?) Which is why you never want to make an electrical connection /splice/tap outside of an approved junction or switch box. I have had to trouble shoot numerous old installation that suddenly went dead only to find sloppy make up in a box some where that finally burned thru the wire nut. The j-box contains the failing connection and its escalating heat. Bad wiring practices at the turn of the 20th century is what led insurers to create the NFPA and NEC. They got tired of replacing burned down buildings!

Offline Thehardway

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Re: Wiring a TF or Log Home
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2007, 05:25:23 PM »
Bman,

Good observation.  Something that might save some people out there a lot of trouble or even prevent a fire (the original purpose of the NEC) is trying infrared thermal imaging technology which has become more affordable.  It is now very easy after a home (or elecctrical system)is completed to have a thermal scan done of the homes envelope and electrical system.  If done from both inside and out with all electrical systems turned on and in use this would help show things like heating connections or nicked wires.  I would actually like to see AHJ inspectors perform this examination on homes before a CO is isssued. This would actually be more useful in many cases than a visual inspection.   Lot's of things can happen to a wiring system btween the visual RI inspection and the final trim out inspection.  Nails, screws pinched wires, abrasions, bad wire nuts etc. as you mentioned.  Panel boards should be thermally scanned to show incorrectly sized wires or overloaded circuits, faulty breakers or bad lug terminations. This technology is now being used in commercial electrical maintenance environments to find sources of problems before they actually reach failure and result in outages or fires. We use it here at work with very positive results.  We have found bad connections and weak breakers before they actually caused problems.  This imaging technology will often show sources of heat loss due to poor sealing, insulation, etc. that can be fixed and reduce the owners utility bill as well.   Just an idea.
Norwood LM2000 24HP w/28' bed, Hudson Oscar 18" 32' bed, Woodmaster 718 planer,  Kubota L185D, Stihl 029, Husqvarna 550XP


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