The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems

Chainsawr, The Worlds Largest Inventory of Chainsaw Parts

Smith Sawmill Service



Author Topic: Grinder vs. file  (Read 9676 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5666
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #40 on: March 27, 2021, 09:34:59 AM »
My opinion only, the person doing the sharpening determines the quality. A good guy with a file will get a sharper chain than an average guy on a grinder while a good guy on the grinder will do better than the average guy with a file, I like and use a file.
They may be out there, but I have yet to find a "good guy with a grinder" who can get better results on round-ground/round-filed chain than a person with a bit of training and practice using a hand file with one of the better guides out there.
I have found guys with grinders who can do better than the average person with just a bare file, but then I've only met a few people who actually get consistently really good results with just a bare round file (i.e. can hand file time-after-time without having to take it back to the grinder every few sharpenings to "true things up", and can get consistently good results in terms of performance and durability.)
I'll grant that I am sure there are a number of you on here who I would add to the list of those getting consistently good results with a bare file if I had a chance to use some of your chains. My own results with just a bare round file are just what I would call "acceptable" - not great. I've not bothered to practice it much, and my eyesight is not what it used to be, so I stick with the guide.
I don't have much experience with square ground/filed chain. I like it for performance and durability, but I enjoy hand-filing, and figure I don't have much hope at getting good at hand filing square chain in the woods.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 421Altered

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Tifton, Ga.
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #41 on: May 23, 2021, 11:59:55 PM »
I have 2 Oregon grinders set up with the CBN wheels.  However I also hand file my personal chains in the woods or in my shop.  I take off the bare minimum when I grind a chain, so I get many sharpenings out of a chain.  My opinion is if you can hand file in the woods it saves time replacing  the chain.  I can do a touch up every tank in the woods and always have a very sharp chain that throws big chips, never sawdust.  But, if I replace chains and later grind them in my shop, I keep using a chain until it is throwing about half chips, and half sawdust.  I almost never hit the dirt with my chains and hardly ever find metal either, but, if I do, then it's to the grinder!!  I also sharpen chains for all of our volunteer's in our church chainsaw team.  All of those chains are sharpened on the grinder.  Too many to do by hand.  So to me both ways have their advantages and disadvantages.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5666
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2021, 06:41:21 AM »
I also sharpen chains for all of our volunteer's in our church chainsaw team. All of those chains are sharpened on the grinder. Too many to do by hand. So to me both ways have their advantages and disadvantages.
 

Much as I prefer hand filing, if I had a pile of chains to do like that on anything approaching a regular basis, I'd use a grinder.

I enjoy the break that comes with hand filing while cutting in the woods. It's a time to enjoy some quiet, and time to take stock of how I am doing. However, sharpening multiple chains in a row is no longer a break, it's a job. Definitely calls for some automation.

BTW - great idea sharpening for your church's chainsaw team. I'm one of the coordinators of our town's "WoodBank" firewood donation program. For safety reasons, we tend to limit the number of folks who do our cutting, and most of those are well-versed in chain sharpening as well. We also tend to keep that separate from our splitting and stacking efforts, where we have a larger crowd from the general community. Maybe I'll arrange for some sharpening services at out next volunteer day.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 421Altered

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Tifton, Ga.
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #43 on: May 26, 2021, 04:10:45 PM »
I also enjoy taking a break from chainsawing in the woods.  Drink some water, cool down some, and a little rest doesn't hurt this old body!!  Thanks for volunteering your time and saws to cut up firewood for your town's "WoodBank" donation program.  That sounds like a good program.  Our church is active in wind storm damage cleanup, tornado's, hurricane's, straight line winds,  mostly within 100 miles, however sometimes we go further.  I've found that volunteer's are among the hardest workers you will find anywhere.  Sometimes they do things that I would not even consider doing.  When I first joined, after a tornado, they were cutting 18" diameter pine trees into 12" long cylinders, and rolling them about 150 feet to the right of way! Another time, cutting 24" diameter oak into 24" long pieces, putting them onto a hand truck and rolling them to the curb!  Man you talk about tough!!  Since then, we have a skid steer that does the work!!  We can do many more yards much quicker and easier now!!

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5666
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #44 on: May 26, 2021, 05:40:45 PM »
Sounds like a great group, 421Altered. Our storm response here is not any organized group, but we do have a large contingent of folks who just make the rounds and help people dig out where needed.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline 421Altered

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Tifton, Ga.
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Grinder vs. file
« Reply #45 on: May 27, 2021, 10:59:07 AM »
People helping other people is what it's all about!


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Grinder Head Angles on a TECOMEC chain saw grinder--Same grinder as Oregon 511

Started by hydro2 on Chainsaws

5 Replies
4786 Views
Last post November 29, 2005, 01:15:23 PM
by rickk
xx
New chain file with raker file built in

Started by husky2100 on Chainsaws

6 Replies
1495 Views
Last post November 19, 2014, 10:13:06 PM
by husky2100
xx
The Best File

Started by woodburner on Chainsaws

15 Replies
2906 Views
Last post January 02, 2009, 06:45:16 PM
by Cut4fun
xx
file

Started by trapper on Chainsaws

8 Replies
713 Views
Last post April 20, 2019, 11:46:20 AM
by HolmenTree
 


Powered by EzPortal