The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: BigJim2185 on June 14, 2014, 01:07:33 PM

Title: Production schedule help
Post by: BigJim2185 on June 14, 2014, 01:07:33 PM
I am planning to build a timber frame home over the next ~5 years and I am trying to work out my build schedule.  I am hoping for some input as to whether the following lumber production plan makes sense.

This summer, mill, sticker, and store the following:
- Hemlock 2X framing lumber for all stick framed components
- Maple 2X and 1X flooring
- Pine/ cedar sheathing for walls and ceilings
- Cedar clapboard siding

Winter 2014:
Harvest white pines for frame

Winter / Spring 2015:
- Mill frame and cut joinery for summer 2015 raising

My thought was to let all materials milled this summer dry for a year (+/-) indoors, then plane and shape T&G on floors, ceilings, and sheathing prior to installation.  My logic is that this might eliminate warping issues that may arise if shaped prior to storage, at the expense of having to plane and shape hard, dry maple for the floors.  Does this make sense? Would proper storage eliminate warping issues to a degree that would keep T&G ready to go together after a year of storage if I shaped it as I milled it?   

I am having difficulty finding out how to store clapboard siding; should this be milled closer to time of use, or is there a good drying / storage method?     

As you can probably tell, Iím a beginner...all advice is welcome.  Thanks guys. 
Title: Re: Production schedule help
Post by: drobertson on June 14, 2014, 01:26:31 PM
Sounds like you have a great plan, not sure on timber framing, for some reason, I was thinking joints were made while green? Mainly for ease of the machine work,(by hand) I most likely am way off, but best of success to you, keep us posted with some pics of the project if possible.    david
Title: Re: Production schedule help
Post by: Bruno of NH on June 14, 2014, 01:54:57 PM
Big Jim
I wouldn't cut the hemlock framing lumber that early in you schedule it will be so hard you will have to screw it together .
Just my thoughts my home is framed with eastern hemlock.
Jim Bruno of nh
Title: Re: Production schedule help
Post by: BigJim2185 on June 14, 2014, 07:58:19 PM
Bruno of NH - The original portion of the house I'm currently in is a hemlock timber frame.  I have done a little work with old, dry, reclaimed hemlock beams, and I agree it is tough to work.  I hadn't considered that it would be an issue in stick form being shot with a framing gun. You think it would be too tough to shoot nails through?
Title: Re: Production schedule help
Post by: Bruno of NH on June 14, 2014, 08:24:43 PM
Big Jim
You might have a problem with splitting  in air dryed hemlock using an air nailer .
Bruno