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Small game hunting

Started by HOGFARMER, October 04, 2000, 02:38:58 PM

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HOGFARMER

Does anyone know of some good partridge or woodcock hunting spots on public land in lower Michigan, preferably mid-Michigan? I would appreciate the help.
Manual LT-30

Jeff

Bob, guess what? I know a place that has a lot of partridge, and it is right close to you! State land next to our 40 in midland county. Check your private messages on here.

Hey, keep posting

HOGFARMER

Thanks Jeff!  I will definately check that out.
Manual LT-30

Forester Frank

I would check with the closest DNR office to you. That can probably tell you of some areas where they have cut aspen. Grouse like a mixture of aspen age classes (height) for habitat. I have found the best luck in stands that are between 15-20 years old.

The DNR can direct you to stands that have been cut between 1980-1985. Be sure to ask one of the older foresters on the staff. Good luck!
Forester Frank

Jeff

Question:
When you guys (foresters) are setting up a management plan to attract wildlife, do you often recommend specific understory plants? The reason I ask is that over on my family's 40 in Midland county we planted some autumn olive because we heard the grouse like it. Well we heard right! you cannot walk past the stuff right now with out birds busting out of it. Would this be a plant that you might specify? Does it cause any problems when planted? (this seems to be kinda taking over it's area)

HOGFARMER

Jeff, I don't usually deal with Aspen at all, and when I used to, that is not something I recommended. I have heard that speckled alder attracts grouse too when it is growing in or around young aspen clones.  
Manual LT-30

Forester Frank

Jeff:

I know a lot of landowners that love the Autumn Olive, but the negative about it is that it is so invasive (as you described). I usually recomend native species. For Michigan that may include hawthorn, sargents crab, silver buffalo berry (a native cousin to autumn olive), several species of oak, beach plum, currants, dogwood, etc. Some plants are site specific (sandy soils, wet soils).

Attracting many types of wildlife is a priority for many of the landowners I run into. Give the above list a try.

JGG

Forester Frank

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