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Other topics for members => FOOD! FOOD! FOOD! => Topic started by: sawguy21 on December 26, 2018, 12:44:13 PM

Title: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 26, 2018, 12:44:13 PM
We had two Americans at Christmas dinner and got talking about different foods on each side of the border. I knew poutine, which I don't care for, is uniquely Canadian but was surprised to learn butter tarts, that sweet, sticky concoction we are all addicted to at this time of year are unheard of in the U.S. She doesn't bake so loves to come here to get her 'fix'. She also said she has trouble finding good fish and chips at home and had never seen a nanaimo bar which I suspect is unique to B.C. I wonder if there are other foods Americans have encountered for the first time here.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Southside on December 26, 2018, 12:53:49 PM
Your bacon is different than in the States and something about the pizza, but I can't remember what exactly.  Never have seen fondu in the US either. 
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Raider Bill on December 26, 2018, 01:34:14 PM
We have restaurants around here that only sells fondue called "The Melting Pot".
I remember back in the late 70's early 80's fondue sets were all the rage for christmas.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: LeeB on December 26, 2018, 01:40:02 PM
We have restaurants around here that only sells fondue called "The Melting Pot".
I remember back in the late 70's early 80's fondue sets were all the rage for christmas.
Wonder how many of them are still sitting on top of refrigerators gathering dust in the unopened box?  :D :D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Raider Bill on December 26, 2018, 01:42:53 PM
We have restaurants around here that only sells fondue called "The Melting Pot".
I remember back in the late 70's early 80's fondue sets were all the rage for christmas.
Wonder how many of them are still sitting on top of refrigerators gathering dust in the unopened box?  :D :D
Very true! I know the one I gave my Dad back in the late 70's was still in the unopened box down in his cellar when I cleaned the house out in 2010.

Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: LeeB on December 26, 2018, 01:47:43 PM
The perfect regift. 
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Texas Ranger on December 26, 2018, 01:49:01 PM
Years ago my dad's employer would have dad (pilot) fly him  and party to Canada for hunting and fishing.  Dad came back with one story where they would kill a bird, and hang it till the hide slipped before cleaning and cooking.  Never knew if I could believe some of the stories he would tell, but that one rang true.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 26, 2018, 03:31:42 PM
Your bacon is different than in the States and something about the pizza, but I can't remember what exactly.  Never have seen fondu in the US either.
I had forgotten about bacon, it is different from yours. I have not seen fondu for years, it was THE rage at dinner parties.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Don P on December 26, 2018, 05:00:33 PM
We had 2 sets that I remember, one was avocado green and ran on sterno the other harvest gold and ran on denatured alcohol. the forks had colored ends so you knew which one was yours. We used them with hot oil for meat, or cheese or chocolate for dipping stuff in. They were kinda fun. The next time I ran into fondue type meat was in western Iowa, they called it chislic... spiced deep fried chunks of beef, duck, muley and whitetail. Being from the land of "you can deep fry anything" I thought it was yummy. The main thing I've gotten from the Canadians I've met was, take it easy on the spices, I can make their food inedible to them pretty easily, don't know if that is an accurate depiction or just the folks I've dined with.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: rjwoelk on December 26, 2018, 05:16:14 PM
We have OhHenery chocolate bar.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: TimRB on December 26, 2018, 05:55:45 PM
I sure wouldn't mind if a plate of my wife's mom's Nanaimo bars showed up out of the blue somehow.

Tim
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on December 26, 2018, 06:09:36 PM
Lots of Oh! Henry bars around when I was a kid in the stone age
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: lxskllr on December 26, 2018, 06:11:30 PM
When I was a kid I had a fondue set I got at a yard sale. Probably around 1978. Seemed like more fun than it actually was. I think I only used it a couple times.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on December 26, 2018, 06:12:11 PM
I also recall peameal bacon in Ontario
Ate it once dont remember how it was to a central new Yorkers  taste
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Old Greenhorn on December 26, 2018, 07:39:56 PM
We had 2 sets that I remember, one was avocado green and ran on sterno the other harvest gold and ran on denatured alcohol. the forks had colored ends so you knew which one was yours. We used them with hot oil for meat, or cheese or chocolate for dipping stuff in. They were kinda fun. The next time I ran into fondue type meat was in western Iowa, they called it chislic... spiced deep fried chunks of beef, duck, muley and whitetail. Being from the land of "you can deep fry anything" I thought it was yummy. The main thing I've gotten from the Canadians I've met was, take it easy on the spices, I can make their food inedible to them pretty easily, don't know if that is an accurate depiction or just the folks I've dined with.
I hadn't thought of this in years, but when I was a kid, my Dad, My uncle George and a few of their buddies (4-6 total would leave every September to make the long drive to Newfoundland to hunt Moose. They would come home with several animals and each freezer was full for the year. I grew up on moose meat. But to the point, my Aunt Julia loved to cook and she began, over many years compiling her on recipe book of different ways to cook moose. She had some great ones and my Mom would use many of them. The best one EVER was moose fondue. Hot oil of course and sirloin tip of moose. It was like candy. We had it at my AUnt's house for the first time she tried it, and when the adults were full they retired to the patio for after dinner drinks. I sat there (11 years old) and ate everything that was left. I was in heaven. Oh that was so good I can taste it still today as I write. The other thing she made was deep fried eel, was was also like something from heaven. My Dad and his brother would take me eeling late at night out on the bay. I hated the catching (spearing) part with all those eels wriggling around in the bottom of the boat around my feet (I was about 10 years old). We would get back in around midnight and the next morning we would skin them out and soak them until my aunt did her thing. They were just like marshmallows. I would eat them until I could no longer move. Funny the things you remember.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Hilltop366 on December 26, 2018, 08:26:44 PM
We had fondue at my sister in law"s on Christmas eve, have been for the last few years. Around 14 people at the table with 5 or six fondue pots with beef, pork and chicken mostly, some years it is seafood with lobster, shrimp and scallops.
  
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Hilltop366 on December 26, 2018, 09:13:50 PM
How about a hot lobster sandwich aka creamed lobster sandwich?

Canada is so big and varied in land/sea scape and cultural background that what I think of as Canadian is probably more regional.

Now back to the lobster sandwich, I will post a link to an article of how it became popular here, the restaurant in the article was located right next door (to the north) to my grandparents small farm. I grew up about 700 feet to the south of the farm, my parents had a motel the restaurant was so popular tourist from all over would plan their trips around going there to eat year after year.

http://eastcoastliving.ca/2017/12/hot-lobster-sandwich/ (http://eastcoastliving.ca/2017/12/hot-lobster-sandwich/)
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 26, 2018, 09:15:21 PM
Let me know when you have seafood!!
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Hilltop366 on December 26, 2018, 09:21:20 PM
Sure but it's a bit of a drive!  :D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: 69bronco on December 27, 2018, 07:03:25 AM
We visited friends north of the border years ago and they had Raclette. Not sure on the spelling, It was a kind of large hot plate with individual little pans. There were platters of different meats and veggies and you cooked your own and melted Raclette cheese over the top. It was a sociable event and very enjoyable, I could never find Raclette cheese until recently I found some in Florida.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: GAB on December 27, 2018, 08:54:07 AM
All of my g'parents were born in Que., and my parents were born on farms that the north border of the farm was the U.S. /Canada line or international boundary.
Two of the dishes my mother would ocassionally make were maple syrup pie, and maple syrup dumplings.
I'm thinking these were originally Canadian dishes because one of the recipies had a french name.
For a batch of dumplings you start with a quart of maple syrup and you cook the dough in it.
Ah-yup it is sweet and mighty good and also very inflationary.
Gerald
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Bruno of NH on December 27, 2018, 09:29:24 AM
Tuterire meat pie my family made around this time of year
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 27, 2018, 12:22:02 PM
Home made maple syrup is scarce here in the west, no sugar maples. I love the stuff on corn bread which is actually relatively unknown here but very popular in the east.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: curved-wood on December 27, 2018, 02:19:07 PM
We visited friends north of the border years ago and they had Raclette. Not sure on the spelling, It was a kind of large hot plate with individual little pans. There were platters of different meats and veggies and you cooked your own and melted Raclette cheese over the top. It was a sociable event and very enjoyable, I could never find Raclette cheese until recently I found some in Florida.
We had a memorable raclette meal beside a lake and a wood fire. Took a chunk of raclette cheese hook with a large fork, face melt with the heat of the wood fire, scrape the smoked melted cheese on potatoes accompanied with deer sausages, homemade dill and a super Toscan wine. The type of meal that you add some sausage to finish your potatoes, add some cheese to finish the potatoes and add some more sausages to finish the potatoes.....I had to roll to reach my bed.    Thanks the Universe , God or … for those good moments. Why me ? I dont know, but I am grateful.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: rjwoelk on December 27, 2018, 04:29:07 PM
So my Dad came from the Russia, mennonite background, most folk call them crepes we called them Russian pancakes, egg, flour, salt vanila, milk, a very runny batter. they were as big as a dinner plate,  mom would have a stack of them at each end of the table.(8 of us kids) we would put brown sugar and cinnamon, or rogers golden syrup.  Now we use cooked rhubarb sweetened with brown or white sugar. This was a meal not dessert.  digin1 digin_2
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: dgdrls on December 27, 2018, 05:10:04 PM
Tuterire meat pie my family made around this time of year

mmmmmm!!
D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: lil171 on December 27, 2018, 10:37:24 PM
Not exactly traditional foods, but..... We have Ketchup Chips, but, the US has Reeses Pieces....
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 28, 2018, 01:14:04 PM
Do you not see Reese's Pieces? They are very popular here, I try to stay away from them.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: gspren on December 28, 2018, 03:39:35 PM
I believe the various food traditions are more regional than Canada-U.S., there are food traditions that vary from my home town to my wife's home town and they are only 30 miles apart.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: jimbarry on December 28, 2018, 03:52:09 PM
Eatmore bars... Americans don't know what they're missin' :) 

More uniquely east coast Canadian, is the donair.  A spicy meat, shaved and served on flat bread (pita wrap, aka soft taco shell) with a sweet white sauce that is flavoured with garlic. Along with options like onion, lettuce and tomato.  A few restaurants sell the meal, but we make our own.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20037/20180331-donair1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1546029961)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20037/20180403-donairmeat-8.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1546029957)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20037/20180403-donairmeat-3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1546029956)
 


More current, a twist on the poutine dish out of Quebec, us east coasters serve up donairtine (pronounced doh-nair-teen).

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20037/20181220-donairtine.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1546030262)
 

Recipe is on my web site if anyone is interested.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on December 28, 2018, 10:22:50 PM
The donair 8) They are not uniquely Canadian but boy are they good. Interesting that Eat More bars, molasses and peanuts, are not sold stateside and neither is Coffee Crisp which is one of the few candy bars I like.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Southside on December 28, 2018, 10:34:05 PM
Tim Hortons!!!  But a few have crept into Maine.  
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: lil171 on December 28, 2018, 11:44:09 PM
Do you not see Reese's Pieces? They are very popular here, I try to stay away from them.
Honestly, I have not looked for them for a while. I am not much of a sweets person, let alone peanut and peanut butter, so have not noticed. Now tomorrow I will be looking.....
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: rubberfish on March 09, 2019, 03:42:39 PM
We have the Kinder Egg. We win.  8)
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: K-Guy on April 26, 2019, 03:48:35 PM
Being that I live in the US now, one thing I miss in many restaurants is being able to get gravy for my french fries.In Canada it's normal but here only along the border.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: GeorgeFindlay on April 26, 2019, 05:40:34 PM
A traditional Canadian dish served during Christmas is, Tourtiere. This is truly a 'comfort food' on any cold winter's eve.

Tourtiere is 'French Canadian' meat pie composed of a 50/50 mixture of ground beef and ground pork cooked up in bacon fat with diced onion and an array of spices.

If you enjoy horseradish as a condiment, try it on tourtiere....Angel food!!!!!!!!!

Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Skip on April 27, 2019, 08:16:44 AM
WE do a lot of fries and gravy down my way . :)
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Magicman on April 27, 2019, 04:04:36 PM
I love gravy on my fries and I am 'bout as far from the "Northern" border as you can get.  ;D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 04, 2019, 06:59:24 PM
I couldn't discern one food for one country since the family is a mix of folks from both sides of the line. They eat what we eat. I couldn't come up with anything that stands out. Heck them Mainers like our Crosby molasses and King Cole tea, but we have to go to Maine to get molasses donuts made in New Brunswick. You can't buy a molasses donut in New Brunswick. But in our kitchens we made them, so there is nothing unique there. :D We both like soldier and yellow eye beans, those white beans in cans from the big canneries (Busch, Heinz and the like) ain't nothing we ate in a New Brunswick or Maine home. Next weekend I'm having my fill down in Patten, Maine as they cook them in pots placed in hot wood coals (bean hole beans) at the lumbermen's museum. They will be soldier beans, anyone want to bet otherwise? ;) I'm having my biscuit cooked on reflector ovens on the fire and molasses cake to. :D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: K-Guy on August 06, 2019, 11:41:11 AM
Being that my family background is also mennonite, I miss my mom's Hühnersuppe.
@rjwoelk (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=26761)  will understand. That is a German/Dutch chicken soup and other old country foods.

No my mom isn't gone but she's in BC and I'm in Maine.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: sawguy21 on August 06, 2019, 12:05:36 PM
 ;D My landlady is Mennonite, occasionally I get a treat left by the door. Sticky buns are my favorite but it's all good.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: rjwoelk on August 07, 2019, 02:27:55 AM
Yes all that good Mennonite food, Rolkucken and water melon.  We never went hungry.
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Elmlodger on October 02, 2019, 04:45:44 PM
I saw this thread and wanted to add, Oreos. You might think they'd be the same but their not. Test me, set a box from the States beside your Canadian ones and the Canadian ones will win every taste test.  
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Skip on October 02, 2019, 06:32:15 PM
American ones are made in Mexico  >:(
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: K-Guy on October 03, 2019, 08:28:25 AM
American ones are made in Mexico  >:(
You can't get more American than that!! :D
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: K-Guy on October 03, 2019, 09:26:34 AM
@rjwoelk (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=26761) 

I really miss mennonite sausage. I want to make my own, do you have a good recipe for these?
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: Andries on October 03, 2019, 10:36:17 AM
Kguy: Mennonite sausage or Ukranian sausage? ( no, not a political comment!)
Being an Alberta ķguy - which is the best?
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: K-Guy on October 03, 2019, 02:50:34 PM
@Andries (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=9307) 

I generally like all sausage except for hot ones but in this case mennonite. I was raised in a family that left the church before I was born. I love the sausage. 
Title: Re: Unique Canadian food traditions
Post by: rjwoelk on October 04, 2019, 10:38:06 AM
Kguy my dad used very lean pork, smoked in salt and pepper  to taste and smoked it. I have made sausage from pork and a lot from sheep. We had a lot if cull sheep every year so that is what we used.