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General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: ManjiSann on October 31, 2019, 09:14:20 AM

Title: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on October 31, 2019, 09:14:20 AM
Finished the milling jig and even though it was freezing cold I wanted to try it out. I layered up for warmth and off I went.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0225~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526277)

I started off on a small log to practice

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0227.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526319)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0228.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526331)

Ended up with some nice boards I can use for shelves or doors or something on an upcoming project

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0229.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526344)

That went quite well so I moved on to the bigger log I have. Getting it up on the saw horses on my own was a bit of a challenge. Put it on some stumps first then was able to lift one end at a time and slip a saw horse under.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0231.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526353)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0232.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526360)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0230.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526336)

Got it oriented for the first cut, attached my super accurate space age guide on it and started sawing.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0233.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526370)

Got the first flitch off (I think I used that term correctly  ??? ??? )  Rotate and again installed my amazing guide

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0234.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526364)

Cut and now I have my very first cant!

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0235.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526377)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0236.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526383)


Was able to get 5 nice 5/4 boards ranging from 7" to 9" wide and slightly under 4' long. Ripped the other edge off using the table saw. I stickered them in my basement as I have nowhere else to put them for now. I think it should work fairly well given how little humidity there is during the winter months, might even help raise the humidity in the house a wee bit :) I figure they'll dry down to around 1" and then I'll have enough left to plane any warp or grooves out and end up with very nice wood.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0238.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572526395)

Decided to keep the last flitch and dry it out. If it dries well I'm thinking I'll try and make a little bench for around the fire pit. I've seen some very nice benches by a few of the forum members so I was inspired, thanks guys!

All in all the jig worked quite well. I did find that the side I can adjust for length isn't square in the vertical so it causes problems when adjusting height. I'll have to weld a new side for that. Because of the funky angle it also causes a slight bow in the bar.

@BUGGUTZ (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=29852) posted some improvement suggestions in another thread I was asking about drilling the bar. I think I'll be implementing at least one of them. On the saw side I need a rail or skid that helps it move over the uneven surface of the bark. It's just a square tube right now and it hangs up to easily.

I think I will also be adding an auxiliary oiler. I'm not positive it's absolutely needed on this short of a bar but I am certain if I step up to a longer b/c that it will be required. May as well build one now and work the kinks out so when I HAVE to have it I'm not scrambling.

Also have to figure out why a couple of the screws on the saw keep vibrating out. Lost the screw for the chain brake again, good thing I bought several spares. The bolt in the nose also kept backing out so I need to sort that.

Brandon


Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: WV Sawmiller on October 31, 2019, 09:28:16 AM
   Looking good. Congratulations. I am surprised at the use of sawhorses. I thought with CSM the user just rolled the log around a bit to get it stable the sawed through and through. I was surprised to see you rotated and made a cant - again something I did not think was common with CSM. I thought the users typically just sawed all unedged flitches then edged them afterwards. Your process seems to be working well. Keep them posts a'coming.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Southside on October 31, 2019, 09:28:49 AM
Good job!!  Not sure I would want to have a running chainsaw mill on a round log, on top of saw horses though. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Brad_bb on October 31, 2019, 12:24:46 PM
Yeah, good job.  I did laugh when I saw your first log, think "Could you pick a shorter log?".  Haha.  Actually short ones can be more difficult to fixture and keep stable while you mill.  I've done some short ones, but they were crotches.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on October 31, 2019, 04:42:37 PM
looks like you are having fun, making stuff with what you have.  My dad used to peen the threads on a trouble bolt, or could use locktite.  not enough room to double nut.  does or can the bolt go all the way trough and put a nut on the backside, or even a nylox or other locking nut?  looks good.  best regards!
be sure to coat your ends with something, like anchorseal of at least old latex paint.
can you remove the bucking spikes and fab a roller or skid in its place?
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: ManjiSann on October 31, 2019, 06:16:51 PM
WV -  Not sure how CSM is supposed to be done. I watched a few youtubes on it and one guy used saw horses, and I don't like kneeling for long or bending over so I used the saw horse. That log was probably one of the biggest I can get away with that though due to the weight. In the future I'll likely have to mill on the ground. I figured by making a cant I'd have at least one "finished" edge to use on my table saw. It seemed easier than trying to use a circular saw and straight edge later. On bigger logs I'll likely saw 3 sides so I have finished boards. 

Southside - Awww come on, you gotta live a little ;)  Seriously though, I had boards on either side of the log to reduce the chance of it rolling. While not rock solid I felt it was quite stable. 

Brad - Haha I figured someone would get a kick out of that short first log. I picked it as I figured if I messed it up it wouldn't be a huge waste. Also, up until about a week ago I haven't really been collecting large logs from the trees I'd cut down. Now that I have the mill I'll be looking at logs with an eye to maximizing what I can mill. I'm also limited with a small truck and no heavy equipment I can use to move stuff nor wild areas I can mill logs at the moment. I'll be keeping my eyes open for opportunities now :)

@doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) - I kept reading that as peening heads on trouble bolts, now that I've read it correctly as threads, are you saying he'd deliberately mess the threads up a bit to make it harder to get in and out? I ask as I've toyed with that idea and knowing someone did it successfully may influence my decision. The bolt near the sprocket that kept coming loose has a lock washer on one side but I wasn't cranking it super tight due to some non square issues in the build causing the bar to bow. I think if I'd been able to solidly tighten it down it wouldn't have come loose but I'll remember the peening trick if it continues to be an issue once I've fixed the other issues. I may try and peen AND loctite the screw in the chain brake handle. I bought some liquid blue loctite to use. I think the tape would have worked but I was using it too sparely but will try the liquid stuff now. 

I have some parafin wax in a paint can, I'll have to warm it up and use it to seal the ends. I've read conflicting info on that, some say that any splits won't go past the stickers so no sealing is needed. Since I have the wax I may as well use it. 

I could remove the bucking spikes but there's no need. The saw side vertical riser, thingy, what would it be called? Anyhow, it has a 6" rail that I will probably weld a skid to. 

I'm 99% happy with the milling jig and the results. Most of the things I want to change are fairly minor, but when you build stuff you always find things you want to do different. Since it only cost about $22 is steel tube I'll keep tinkering till I am completely happy with it... so I'll keep tinkering forever  :D :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on October 31, 2019, 06:25:18 PM
yes he peened the threads!  see you had to work for it.  I did not catch that.  He grew up poor and would not have gone to the hardware store, if they even had Loctite then.  just a touch as you do not want to ruin too much thread. You need a trailer to haul with and maybe build a rack to mill logs on incorporated into the trailer.  or build heavy saw horses out of your timber and then you can screw your side supports into it making it like all one unit.  you do not need my ideas as you are doing great, but it is fun for us old guys to throw them out.  have a great day!
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on October 31, 2019, 06:31:05 PM
end coating according the experts is vital to reduce waste and best if done early @GeneWengert-WoodDoc (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20498)   .  the split often does not go past the second sticker and some recommend double stickering at the ends.  If you are like me, at first you just cannot wait to cut stuff, later you goals become to produce better product for yourself, or for sale.

can you put a spacer washer in-between the trouble spot so you can wrench the bolt tight without torqueing (not twerking
@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103)  :)) your frame.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: ManjiSann on October 31, 2019, 07:48:48 PM
yes he peened the threads!  see you had to work for it.  I did not catch that.  He grew up poor and would not have gone to the hardware store, if they even had Loctite then.  just a touch as you do not want to ruin too much thread. You need a trailer to haul with and maybe build a rack to mill logs on incorporated into the trailer.  or build heavy saw horses out of your timber and then you can screw your side supports into it making it like all one unit.  you do not need my ideas as you are doing great, but it is fun for us old guys to throw them out.  have a great day!
I always appreciate peoples ideas even if I don't end up using them so always feel free to throw them out! I hadn't considered incorporating some sort of rack to mill on in the trailer  :P
 I've got some ideas for a trailer, just have to wait till finances and time permit. Until then I'll make do with what I have which isn't too bad all things considered :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: ManjiSann on October 31, 2019, 07:52:52 PM
end coating according the experts is vital to reduce waste and best if done early @GeneWengert-WoodDoc (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20498)   .  the split often does not go past the second sticker and some recommend double stickering at the ends.  If you are like me, at first you just cannot wait to cut stuff, later you goals become to produce better product for yourself, or for sale.

can you put a spacer washer in-between the trouble spot so you can wrench the bolt tight without torqueing (not twerking
@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103)  :)) your frame.
Well the point of joining the forum was to gain knowledge from those with more experience so I'd be foolish not to listen. I'll get the wax melting and once the wife gets back from taking the littlest one trick-or-treating I'll go down and seal the ends. 
I tried to put a washer to take up some of the problem but it didn't work. I'll take a pic and post it just so people can understand what I'm talking about. It's an easy fix, just weld up a new adjustable cross piece. I still have some tubing around that'll work. 
... twerking...  :-X :-X :-X
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Old Greenhorn on October 31, 2019, 08:17:31 PM

can you put a spacer washer in-between the trouble spot so you can wrench the bolt tight without torqueing (not twerking @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103)  :)) your frame.
Just to be clear here, 'twerking' refers to a pathophisilogical condition referring to the human body (the specific definition depends on if you are a physician from Kansas, or an old guy from upstate NY). Torquing refers to radial application of force. Tweaking refers to that elusive, yet effective  application of adjustments that creates a state of bliss. I though we had already been through this Doc?
 I don't think Manjisan needs any twerking or torquing, he just needs a little tweaking.
 BTW Manji, congrats on the boards, the journey begins......
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Nebraska on October 31, 2019, 08:56:55 PM
Torquing, tweaking, and twerking all in the same thread go figure.  ;D Nice job on the mill and  on the first  boards!  If your kids have a swing set and you had a come along or a small chain hoist I bet you could raise those logs easier the man glitter that lands  underneath  would be cushion if the  kids fell off the swing. ;) 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: SawyerTed on October 31, 2019, 09:12:52 PM
Great job!  A little bit of lumber for some projects and you made it yourself with a CSM you built!  Congratulations!  

The sawhorses worry me too.  Personally I'd want something more substantial.  I see the sawhorses tipping over and taking your chainsaw down with the log.  It could be bad.  I see a heavy bench in your future with a cherry picker engine hoist or gantry crane with chain hoist for lifting your logs. They are pretty cheap on FB Marketplace or CL.   Just a thought.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Southside on October 31, 2019, 11:10:44 PM
Oh, believe me I do "live a little" - see my post in the "Yellow jackets" thread if you want to get an idea of my mind set.  What I don't enjoy doing is visiting @doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) when he is working, much rather visit with him at Jakes or another non-work related event.   ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on October 31, 2019, 11:18:59 PM
I am working now @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297)  if you need anything,  I have a frozen suppository with your name on it, we can fix you right up!!! :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D Have you tried out you ruler yet?  If nothing else, your wife will have it to use on you if needed! :).  
ps it is very hard to write a name on a suppository.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Southside on October 31, 2019, 11:33:52 PM
No actual use of the ruler by myself or my wife yet.... :D  Years back I walked into an ER after getting bitten in both hands by my own K-9.  It was messy, lots of blood, hair, torn uniform, etc.  While walking past folks in the sitting area I simply said "You should see the other guy" and left it at that, shocked faces for sure!!  

Well, we go through the whole wound cleaning thing, not going to stitch it, yadda, yadda, yadda, been through it too many times.  Get to the anti-biotics part, Rocephin, and I asked the ER doc if he could just do IM as I really didn't feel like sitting around for a 1/2 hour for an IV drip of the stuff.  Sure he says, and yes I know how much it stings.  Well the visiting nurse comes in and gives me the shot in my butt muscle, and boy oh boy did it hurt.  A while later I am still shaking and the ER doc asks if I have any allergies, to which I tell him I figure it's probably just the adrenaline wearing off, but yea it still stings pretty badly.  He turns to the nurse and asks her how much lidocaaine she had mixed in, the look on her face said it all - she didn't know she was supposed to mix it in.  The good news was the pain in my butt took the focus off of my hands...

So to sum things up, I am rather sure I know what your frozen suppository feels like.... :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on October 31, 2019, 11:43:11 PM
at least now, the doc has to order the lidocaine so maybe he forgot.  you are a good sport.   8)
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Brucer on November 01, 2019, 12:04:56 AM

... On the saw side I need a rail or skid that helps it move over the uneven surface of the bark. It's just a square tube right now and it hangs up to easily.

... I could remove the bucking spikes but there's no need. The saw side vertical riser, thingy, what would it be called? Anyhow, it has a 6" rail that I will probably weld a skid to.


I created a skid for mine from a piece of square tubing about a foot long. I cut a triangular notch in the front end and bent and welded the side to create a taper that would ride over rough surfaces. The extra length tended to average out irregularities in the bark.

Rather than weld the skid to the mill, I fastened it beneath the bar using two pieces of threaded rod with 4 nuts on each. Two nuts clamped the rod to that short 6" rail on the riser and the other two clamped the skid to the rod. I left enough space between the skid and the bolt holding the bar to the riser so I could slide the chain out if I needed to change it. The skid extended about 6" ahead of the bar.

Because the skid was below the bar it kept the upper part of the mill well clear of any bumps on the log.



Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventure
Post by: ManjiSann on November 01, 2019, 09:28:43 AM
The saw horses are a lot more stable than they must appear. They are "rated" for 2500 lbs each (if my memory serves) though I don't have any intentions of trying that much weight. As for the log rolling, I made sure it was stable as I thought about the log rolling and taking a running chainsaw with it.. the original SAW documentary  :o :o  I appreciate all the concerns, I know it's because everyone cares and no one wants to see me or anyone else hurt, so thank you :)

@Nebraska (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=45256) the man glitter reference made me smile  :) The idea of a combination swing lift is intriguing. My wife and youngest have asked for a swing a couple times... maybe I should say yes. Two swings and a bar that extends a ways out with a chain hoist on it might be just the ticket along with a couple stout saw horses or bench to hold large logs. Hmmmm I see another welding project for next year  :D :D :D

@SawyerTed (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=38503)  A stout bench would be awesome but I'm limited on space right now. I'm hoping to build a shed with an extended roof on either side I can use to store a trailer under and/or as a sawing area and drying area but it's not likely to happen for several years. Until then I'm limited to things I can either store outside or can collapse and stack in a small area. I may try and do some sort of combination swing set gantry crane set up, it'd be an easier sell to the family  :D

@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) That was a very well written definition of the three words... did you ever do a stint writing for Websters? ;)

@Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) I haven't read the yellowjacket thread for a bit but I was laughing hard at "the c4 is so they know I'm serious"  :D :D :D  .... do I dare ask about the ruler???

@Brucer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1885)  thanks for the suggestion about the skid I may try it. 


I'm playing hooky from work today, the littlest decided to smash her finger in the door last night just before going out to Trick-or-Treat. I'm sure it hurt real bad but doesn't look like any more damage than the expected swelling and a bruise. Hey Doc and anyone else that deals with injured patients, how do you handle people that come to you to make it better but won't listen and follow instructions because they think it'll just hurt more?  

Anyhow, I plan to make this time off work count so I'll probably weld up the new adjustable bar to try and fix the angle issue and then either mill some new boards or I may cut the maple I free hand cut a while back down into rough 2x2 or 3x3 sizes and sticker them in the basement so I can have the garage space back and maybe reduce the number of ratchet straps holding them down. Whatever I do I'm sure it'll involve more man glitter in my pockets :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on November 01, 2019, 10:40:05 AM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620) .  It depends on their age and or level of intoxication.  always be honest so they trust you the next time.  establish a rapport and then pull that sticker out or what ever.  drilling a hole in a finger nail to let a blood collection out can be tuff even in so called "grown ups" @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) .  they think it will hurt, and it will if there is not enough blood to buffer the underlying skin.  after 30 years of experience I can gain the confidence of about 80% of people including kids.  the other 20% will give you gray thin hair and a foul tongue... just got off a 12 hours shift, went to two meetings can you tell?... and now in bed, watching news and typing.  sorry for the visual @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) .  so the short answer is "good luck". :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 01, 2019, 12:22:35 PM
Not sure how I got called out on this. I am just a lowly EMT, but I will second everything Doc said. I'll add the caveat that is also depends on how fast they are bleeding. Little holes, LOTS of time, big holes, not so much time.  But then, all bleeding stops eventually.  :D
 Patience is key along with a calm steady voice. 
Funny story, years ago (6?) I removed a splinter from my step-grandson because nobody else could seem to get at it. His brothers watched. I got the thing out without any hollering or crying, he was amazed. From that day forward all the brothers will only let me remove anything they can't scratch out themselves. They will wait two days if they have to. (It helps to have very fine surgical tweezers, they can't really feel much from those fine points.)
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: ManjiSann on November 02, 2019, 07:56:28 AM
@doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) and @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) thank you both for your advice and sharing experience on how to work with patients (and patience ;) ) I'll have to work on the calm part. I'm always honest even when I know it'll scare them because, as you pointed out, I figure if I'm honest when I tell them unpleasant things they'll trust me more if I tell them "this really won't hurt."  I don't think there's enough blood under the nail to drill it and make it work so unfortunately she'll have to wait for it to heal on it's own... how would you go about drilling it though? I've heard of heating a sewing needle to being pretty hot and letting that burn/melt its way through the nail, or thought of using a very small drill bit and spinning it with my fingers. Also, how soon after the injury do you need to do it before the blood will have clotted and there's no longer any value in drilling? Oh and Doc, from what I've read, I'd take your bedside manner after a 12 hour shift any day. 


I was fairly productive. I tried to cut up some of the twistier maple boards I had cut a few months back... man I wish I'd had the CSM when I'd done that but I kept telling myself I'd have never bought the bigger saw or made the mill had I not tried it the other way. A few of the boards may be beyond salvaging with the tools I have. I may try and make a sled of sorts for my router to see if I can level some of the other ones before running them through a planer. So long story long, I made a lot of saw dust but no real progress on that front.

I did weld up the new adjustable part for the CSM and it looks like it came out fine. 

The previous arm was ever so slightly no straight up and down so when I tightened the bar tip in the jig it caused the bar to bow just a little which caused the chain to run a little harder than needed and made adjusting height a little more complicated than I wanted to deal with. 

Here's a pic with some lines I drew in to try and show what I mean. Even if the bar was on it would have been hard to see in a pic as it was pretty slight but enough to be an issue:

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0248~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572695196)

If the red line is the bar and the blue is an exagerated representation of the vertical arm, when you tightened the bolt the bar would try to conform and get messed up. When I welded it up the first time I used 1.25" OD for the sleeves and 1" for the middle part and I didn't get the middle perfectly square so the vertical bar was off a few degrees... I hope that makes sense.

Anyhow, welded up a new on using 1.25" tubing for all parts to make alignment easier

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0250.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572694446)

Here's my nifty stick welder 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0249.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572694467)

Love this welder. I'm still learning how to use it correctly and struggle to get the arc struck sometimes but with time and practice I'm certain I'll become proficient. For anyone that read my I Feel Blessed post, I believe I posted about the welder I was blessed to buy and this is the one. Solid, reliable, does the job with a minimum of fuss.

The new bar slides a bit easier than the old one and everything matches up well enough that if there's any deflection I can't detect it with my super accurate Mk.1 Eyeball so I'm happy.

Hopefully I'll have the energy and drive to make some more boards when I get home from work. Speaking of which, it's time to clock in so stay safe y'all :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 02, 2019, 08:06:28 AM
@doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) and @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) thank you both for your advice and sharing experience on how to work with patients (and patience ;) ) I'll have to work on the calm part. I'm always honest even when I know it'll scare them because, as you pointed out, I figure if I'm honest when I tell them unpleasant things they'll trust me more if I tell them "this really won't hurt."  I don't think there's enough blood under the nail to drill it and make it work so unfortunately she'll have to wait for it to heal on it's own... how would you go about drilling it though? I've heard of heating a sewing needle to being pretty hot and letting that burn/melt its way through the nail, or thought of using a very small drill bit and spinning it with my fingers. Also, how soon after the injury do you need to do it before the blood will have clotted and there's no longer any value in drilling? 
I am gonna let Doc take this one as he has tons more experience on this having done it many times more that I ever will. I only do this on myself, and on others I have instructed and coached them through the process. I have never had to do this on a pediatric patient, that can be tough, no matter what. Good luck.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on November 02, 2019, 08:10:56 AM
first great job on the mill frame.  the key to the fingernail thing, is knowing when it will make a difference.  if there is only a speck of blood, and it does not contribute to the pain, do not poke it.  if the nail is floating on an ocean of blood and you can push the nail down and it moves, then there is a blood cushion.  the blood under the nail will usually not clot.  draining the blood can reduce pain, and make it less likely you will hydraulically loose the nail.  nails are made from the same stuff as hair and is not live tissue, except for at the base under the cuticle. drill bit, hot paper clip, needle.  I use a pen cautery, and even with "grown men"  @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) it may take a lot of reassurance and 5 attempts and approaching the finger with a red hot wire.  the key is if there is not enough blood under the nail, it will hurt worse when you are done.
Title: Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
Post by: doc henderson on November 02, 2019, 08:17:12 AM
we developed a process for getting objects out of noses by blowing in the opposite nostril.  after trying for years to coach and reassure the age group that puts stuff in their nose, we started having a little fun with it.  if a nasal foreign body pops up on the screen, it is like a fire drill.  everyone grabs the tubing and mushroom suction device, and before mom and child walk through the door we are ready.  we instantaneously tell mom what we are doing , and blow into the opposite nare and out pops the bead.  the kid is so surprised they sometimes forget to cry and are ready to go home 2 minutes after they arrive.  like many things in life, nothing can replace education and experience.  we did not develop the blowing part, but gave up on 30 minutes of trying to gain the confidence of a 2 year-old.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 02, 2019, 11:24:27 PM
So I've decided to rename the thread and treat it as kind of an ongoing project/adventure/etc thread rather than start a dozen little threads, so hopefully it stays fun and useful  8) 8)

Doc and OG, thanks for the advice on handling patients... the blowing in the opposite nostril seems like something young boys would do to gross the girls out  :D :D

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 02, 2019, 11:46:19 PM
I'm scheduled to help remove a mid sized cottonwood tree next Wednesday so will hopefully have some great lumber to mill from that. Here's the thread where I was asking some questions http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108240.0 (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108240.0) for future readers.

After I arrived home from talking to the gentleman about the cottonwood I milled another pear tree trunk using the mill. It lines up and is easy to set the height on now but I found it was dogging the motor. I did sharpen the chain and set the rakers. I've not made any shims to hold the boards up as I am milling, didn't seem to make a difference on the last one. I wonder if there's a weird angle to the bar now in relation to the jig, I'll have to look into it more. I didn't have time this evening as I was racing the sunset

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0259.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572751859)

This gives you a better idea of my set up space wise. I'm very fortunate my neighbors haven't formed a mob with pitch forks and torches  ;)  I've talked to them and they say they don't notice the noise or if they do it's not a bother. I'm blessed with some fine neighbors. Anywho, back to the milling

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0252.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752004)

I checked and the sawhorses are rated to hold 2500 lbs each. You can make out the edge of one of the 2x3's I have under the log that keeps it from rolling. It is very stable. That being said, if you decide to follow my example against the advice of those wiser and more experienced than I... be sure your equipment is up to the task and that everything is solid and secure. I'm not saying I'm smart, just that I believe I know the risks of what I'm doing and have taken precautions to mitigate them to my comfort level of risk... said every fool ever before getting injured but I digress. Here's a pic showing the boards better, it doesn't look like much but the weight of the log on the boards keeps everything solid.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0253.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752201)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0254.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752345)

The first cut left a fair bit of meat on it but there was a knot I was trying to remove. I was able to go fairly far down though so there wasn't too much waste

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0256.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752373)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0258.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752461)

I'm still amazed by how much sawdust is created in the process. My lovely wife came out, took one look and said "That's a lot of Man Glitter!" The youngest came out and wanted to play in it  :D :D

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0257.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572752487)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 02, 2019, 11:48:06 PM
That whole blowing thing is new to me, but makes sense (and I will keep it in my kit). That is all Doc. When it works for you, you can tell the patient who is responsible for it. With me it's a lot simpler. if I can't fix it i 2 minutes, they are going to the hospital, where they will hopefully meet a guy like Doc who will deal with the issue at hand. My credentials and protocols rarely allow me to fix things, they just allow me to sustain life until such time as they can be billed. In fact, I have been reprimanded several times for treating and releasing people on scene for minor injuries. "Treatment is NOT in or protocols" I was told. :D My bad, I do it all the time when it applies.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on November 03, 2019, 06:58:50 AM
My brother put a marble up his noise. I can still hear my Mother tell the story about the "blow" part.
The blood under the nail should be done as soon as possible for it to work. Not 2 days later.  I have heard of a device that is put over the nail and than so called activated and a red hot point is tripped into the nail to releive the pressure.
Enjoying all the sawing post you are doing.
Looking forward to the building posts with the lumber. Yes,it has to dry first.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 03, 2019, 07:11:50 AM
I spent 20 years trying to teach children to "all the sudden" know how to blow their nose.  It only worked once, and that was an accident cause the girl started laughing since both parents and all 4 sisters were imitating blowing out their nose.  the point is with kids sometimes you have to give up on them being adults! :) . I am not suggesting you should try this at home.  for years parents have blown in their own kids mouth to get stuff out of the nose.  we use compressed O2.  Twice the bead has flown out of the nose and landed in their mouths.  enjoy your breakfast.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 03, 2019, 08:28:34 AM
Oh I will thank you. ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 10:08:49 AM
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns. I feel kinda dumb not realizing it as I was talking to the guy :-[  I woke up this morning at 3am and couldn't get it off my mind. The tree is on the guys property line or in his neighbors property and without liability insurance and the money to afford a lawyer if some stuff I was told turns out to be false it just doesn't seem like a smart risk.  Oh well it's a fantastic learning experience of where my comfort line is. 

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something  ;)  In the mean time I'll keep milling the small stuff I've been getting.


Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 10:09:37 AM
Doc, I enjoyed my bowl of fruity pebbles while reading your story  ;) ;)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 10:17:40 AM
@thecfarm (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=436) What I'm doing is pretty small potatoes compared to many of the forum members so I'm pleased you find it entertaining  :)  

Hopefully in time some bigger stuff comes my way that's in my skill and risk comfort level but until then I'm happy to do this smaller stuff. If nothing else making all this man glitter keeps me entertained and mostly out of trouble and I can post about it and then read about Doc's amazing culinary skill with beads  :D :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on November 03, 2019, 10:26:18 AM
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns. 

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something 
Wise!  According to my insurance agent, tree service is a 100% claim industry.  In other words, insurance companies expect every tree service to have to file a liability claim for injury, property damage or cutting wrong trees etc.
Without proper insurance for tree service work, you got to be very selective on trees you cut for people.  I'm only insured as a portable sawmill business so I don't cut trees anywhere but on our own farm.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on November 03, 2019, 11:09:29 AM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620), Most furniture is not made with 16 footers. ;)  Unless you are a FF member from CA. :D That small stuff works just fine. ;D  As long as you are enjoying something and not harming Old People or Little Kids,have fun. :) 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 01:43:24 PM
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns.

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something
Wise!  According to my insurance agent, tree service is a 100% claim industry.  In other words, insurance companies expect every tree service to have to file a liability claim for injury, property damage or cutting wrong trees etc.
Without proper insurance for tree service work, you got to be very selective on trees you cut for people.  I'm only insured as a portable sawmill business so I don't cut trees anywhere but on our own farm.
@SawyerTed (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=38503) I appreciate the info, makes me feel better about walking away  :)  

I always wonder if I'm over thinking things or what awesome experiences I've talked myself out of due to worry (I had a lot of anxiety as a youth.) So it took me a bit of thinking through things early this morning to finally decide it wasn't overthinking or anxiety but prudence or some wisdom from up above.

SawyerTed, mind if I ask what you pay per year for insurance?  

I'm wondering about the feasibility of CSM on peoples property once they have cut the tree down. The main risks I can think of is damage to grass from walking on it or excessive saw dust. The saw dust I could minimize with tarps. I suppose there's always the outside chance of fire due to malfunctioning engine. Obviously the risk of bodily injury that's always present when running a chainsaw. Damage if I'm not paying attention and back my truck into something. What else am I not thinking of?

In my mind it would allow me to get nice longer boards without having to own and use heavy equipment to remove large logs.  Otherwise I'm limited to about 24"diameter by 4' long logs at the biggest assuming favorable land configurations. 

Trying to brainstorm how to feed my passion within the limitations of my situation  8) 8)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 01:45:00 PM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620), Most furniture is not made with 16 footers. ;)  Unless you are a FF member from CA. :D That small stuff works just fine. ;D  As long as you are enjoying something and not harming Old People or Little Kids,have fun. :)
@thecfarm (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=436) That's a good point and helps to keep it all in perspective, thanks :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on November 03, 2019, 02:31:30 PM
I sent a pm to answer your question 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 02:46:21 PM
I sent a pm to answer your question
Thanks for the information!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 03, 2019, 02:51:37 PM
I am personally glad you are passing.  looks half dead and prob not great wood, poss full of bugs.  it is all about risk vs benefit.  but... I remember being young once too, and took on a lot of projects out of residency, that I had waited years to do.  everyone enjoy your day!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 05:35:16 PM
Thanks Doc, hope your day is a nice one as well!

I think I've read somewhere (I think it was in the business section of this forum) that when starting a business you have to be careful you don't get so wrapped up in the not profitable customers that you don't have time when the good ones come along.

While I'm not doing this as a business or to make money, I figure the analogy is similar. I need to take care that in my excitement (read exuberant greenie inexperience ;) ) I don't spend so much time, effort, money, space sawing any ol' thing that comes along that I won't be able to take on the nice stuff when it comes my way. 

I'm sure more people will need little fruit or other trees removed that are within my risk/rewards comfort level, I just need to be patient. In the mean time I can continue to learn on the forum, saw my little logs into small lumber for my projects, build tools, save up for that new fuel tank my Husky seems to need (darn crack is leaking) and budget for a 36" bar and milling jig so I can perhaps mill bigger stuff. Fortune favors those that are prepared right?  ;) ;)

I suppose I also aught to figure out why I'm so driven to do this and what I want to really get out of it and that will help guide me as well.

Seriously though, do you think there's a market for mobile CSM services?  :P :P

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 03, 2019, 09:49:26 PM
I'm sure there is a market for that, you explicitly instruct that the log will be where and how you want it dropped by some one else. Pack your toys and go do it. I think it out to be worth about may be 50.00$ an hour (just a guess) they are responsible for manglitter disposal, and the mild damaged to the grass.  I bet you can do it.  I doubt very many around there are doing it.  I've seen an add for someone doing it custom south of me in the city. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 03, 2019, 10:40:49 PM
I'm sure there is a market for that, you explicitly instruct that the log will be where and how you want it dropped by some one else. Pack your toys and go do it. I think it out to be worth about may be 50.00$ an hour (just a guess) they are responsible for manglitter disposal, and the mild damaged to the grass.  I bet you can do it.  I doubt very many around there are doing it.  I've seen an add for someone doing it custom south of me in the city.
I was thinking if I were to do such a thing it'd be $50 an hour, so sounds like I'm in the ballpark for pricing. Something for me to ponder over the cold months of winter  :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: YellowHammer on November 03, 2019, 10:59:30 PM
I think there is a market, you just have to market it.  For example, why would I hire you for my job?  

1. Seems you are very portable, I.e, you can get into small spaces, such as backyards, sideyards, etc.

2.  You have a small footprint

3.  Minimal disturbances to the neighbors (your neighbors are a good example)

4.  You can do very short logs (most times lay people call me wanting me to saw up their logs, the arborist has cut them into 4 foot pieces.  No go with for me, but in the sweet zone for a CSM.)

5.  Minimal disturbance to the lawns, no dragging of logs, no tire ruts from equipment.

6.  Minimal cleanup.  I know there is a lot of sawdust, but thats not much compared to when a full size bandmill rolls in.  

7.  I dont know, other stuff?   ???

Something you might try, is a rope and a hand crank.  I came up with this for my old Alaskan mill, its very simple, weighs nothing, and helps tremendously.  I bent a hand crank out of a small steel rod, drilled two holes in the uprights to pass the bent rod through, tied a few feet of paracord to it and the end of the log, and instant hand winch.  


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/SAM_0131.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1364776410)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/SAM_0138.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1364776482)
 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 04, 2019, 09:55:17 AM
I think there is a market, you just have to market it.  For example, why would I hire you for my job?  

1. Seems you are very portable, I.e, you can get into small spaces, such as backyards, sideyards, etc.
2.  You have a small footprint

3.  Minimal disturbances to the neighbors (your neighbors are a good example)

4.  You can do very short logs (most times lay people call me wanting me to saw up their logs, the arborist has cut them into 4 foot pieces.  No go with for me, but in the sweet zone for a CSM.)

5.  Minimal disturbance to the lawns, no dragging of logs, no tire ruts from equipment.

6.  Minimal cleanup.  I know there is a lot of sawdust, but thats not much compared to when a full size bandmill rolls in.  

7.  I dont know, other stuff?   ???

Something you might try, is a rope and a hand crank.  I came up with this for my old Alaskan mill, its very simple, weighs nothing, and helps tremendously.  I bent a hand crank out of a small steel rod, drilled two holes in the uprights to pass the bent rod through, tied a few feet of paracord to it and the end of the log, and instant hand winch.  


@YellowHammer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=11488) I think you may have just layed out the entire marketing scheme for me! Ok, I'm sure you missed a few points but dang that looks pretty comprehensive to me, THANK YOU!  
So far I haven't really felt like I needed a crank but as I go forward I'll certainly keep it in mind. I'd imagine if/when I put a 36" bar on, the extra weight may make pushing it myself less desirable. Also after a few hours of milling I bet that crank would be looking REAL nice. 
I think I'm still a bit away from doing any real milling for other people but it's good to be thinking the details through right now so I'm ready if/when I do decide to pursue it as a side gig.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 04, 2019, 11:32:48 AM
I see a dual head 3120xp super slabber setup in your future ;D ;D ;D.  Just kidding Brandon, but you know I won't be shocked if it happens. Saw dust is powerful stuff indeed.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 04, 2019, 01:14:14 PM
I see a dual head 3120xp super slabber setup in your future ;D ;D ;D.  Just kidding Brandon, but you know I won't be shocked if it happens. Saw dust is powerful stuff indeed.
My initial response was "Haha that'll never happen!!!" then I thought about it for a second... I won't say it'll never happen but I honestly don't see it in my future at this point. Of course 4 months ago I had never used a chainsaw so who's to say where this crazy ride will go ;D ;D ;D.
I'm wondering if sawdust is molecularly related to certain white powders that shall remain un-named but are known for being highly addictive  :P :P  :D :D  There really is just something amazing about taking a chainsaw and turning a log into lumber, or dropping a tree.
Funny side note, did my laundry this morning and turned my socks out only to have a pile of man glitter fall on the floor  ;D ;D Guess I'm going to have to start shaking my clothes outside.
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 04, 2019, 01:23:34 PM
I edged the boards (that's what it called when you cut the bark and such off so they are more or less square?) this morning using my little circular saw on one side then the table saw for the other

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0264.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572891346)

It's a good little cordless saw but the batteries that come with it and drills just don't have much power to them and I'm not at a point where I want to consider getting a couple of the bigger capacity batteries due to the cost  :o :o  So I will now have to cut at least 2 sides with the chainsaw so I can run the board through my table saw. 

I was able to get two nice 10" wide boards this time. But one of the narrower boards had some serious defects in it (you can see it in the above pic) so that one will end up being cut shorter once it dries. I left it long so I could sticker it with the rest. Can you tell the pile is growing  ;D ;D

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0265.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572891355)

I did take Doc's advice and have been sealing the ends. I have a bunch of parfin wax I melt in a paint can and then coat the board ends with that. I'm sure achor seal or one of the other products is a bit easier to work with but it's a bit to spendy for my shoestring budget right now and I can get the wax pretty cheap at the local hobby store in the candle making aisle. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0266.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1572891649)

I'm thinking I need to put a 2x4 as the bottom sticker as the one I currently have is cupping a bit due to the ratchet strap pressure and I'd hate to have the board cup because of it. What size stickers would you guys suggest and how far apart?

Brandon 


Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 04, 2019, 01:42:37 PM
3/4 thick, 1.5 inches wide.  about every 18 to 20 inches is what I do.  depends on species and thickness.  some double sticker the ends of the piles to reduce end check, but coating the ends is the most important.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 04, 2019, 03:28:24 PM
I have the same DeWalt saw but it came with a 5ahr battery.  I now have 5 - 5ahr, 3 - 4ahr and the original 2 1.5ahr for the drills.  You definitely need the 5's for the saw- shop around for some deals on Amazon for 2-packs.  Also, look on Amazon for some Diablo blades for it.  Slightly thinner profile and WAY sharper.  I got a 5 pack for $30 or so.  They cut so much better and the battery lasts longer because of it.

As far as stickering, I think you should make up (or cut up) some pallets the size you need with the first sticker attached (2x4 on edge?).  Do it in such a way that you can get your ratchet straps under it (through the pallet).  You can then use a hand truck when you need to move them around/out of the way.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 04, 2019, 07:45:12 PM
3/4 thick, 1.5 inches wide.  about every 18 to 20 inches is what I do.  depends on species and thickness.  some double sticker the ends of the piles to reduce end check, but coating the ends is the most important.
Aside from the 18-20" that's what I've been doing. I think I'm going to increase the stickers. It'd be a shame to ruin this wood due to a lack of stickers and straps.
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 04, 2019, 07:46:35 PM
I have the same DeWalt saw but it came with a 5ahr battery.  I now have 5 - 5ahr, 3 - 4ahr and the original 2 1.5ahr for the drills.  You definitely need the 5's for the saw- shop around for some deals on Amazon for 2-packs.  Also, look on Amazon for some Diablo blades for it.  Slightly thinner profile and WAY sharper.  I got a 5 pack for $30 or so.  They cut so much better and the battery lasts longer because of it.

As far as stickering, I think you should make up (or cut up) some pallets the size you need with the first sticker attached (2x4 on edge?).  Do it in such a way that you can get your ratchet straps under it (through the pallet).  You can then use a hand truck when you need to move them around/out of the way.
I do need to get some of the bigger capacity batteries. Maybe I'll ask for some for Christmas  :snowball:
The idea of stickering in such a way I can get a hand truck in there is so simple it's neat-o brilliant! Thanks for the suggestion!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Oliver05262 on November 04, 2019, 08:01:41 PM
Be careful melting that wax. You should melt it in a double boiler setup. You cant overheat the wax that way. A half full gallon can of wax on fire can really do some damage. Dont try to move it; cover the can with a piece of metal and shut the heat off. Just sayin..........
  Good luck with the mill, and keep us posted as to how it goes. That board with the defectin it might be really purty used in the right place.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 04, 2019, 08:05:41 PM
I love my battery saw, but rip cuts in thick green lumber really call for a good ol plug in skilsaw. Youll need one anyway if you start building anything substantial. Not a big investment. 

Agree with the diablo blade suggestion. There other good blades, but the diablo are everywhere and not expensive. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: YellowHammer on November 04, 2019, 10:09:08 PM
Manjisan
Glad to help.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 08, 2019, 10:43:12 AM
I don't know that I need one right this moment but looking to the future, what's a good economical moisture meter?

I assume I don't have to kiln dry wood before I build with it so long as I've allowed it to air dry for an appropriate amount of time and the moisture content is low enough? 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JRWoodchuck on November 08, 2019, 11:23:17 AM
You can go to a second hand store and get a worm drive skilsaw for $50. Doesnt run out of battery (unless you dont pay your electric bill) and has way more power.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: captain_crunch on November 08, 2019, 03:47:52 PM
I am no expert I used an Alaskan mill quite a bit and In my opinion you need to work your chain over some or your bar is wore out my bords were smother with a ripping chain from Bayles 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 08, 2019, 03:59:08 PM
I use a no pin Wagner.  if you are near the desert, you can prob. get down to 10 to 12 % MC air drying.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 08, 2019, 04:04:52 PM
I am no expert I used an Alaskan mill quite a bit and In my opinion you need to work your chain over some or your bar is wore out my bords were smother with a ripping chain from Bayles
@captain_crunch (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=9561) When you say I need to work my chain over what are you meaning? I'm interested in any tips/tricks you are willing to share.
I think there's still life in the bar but then again maybe I don't know what I'm looking for. How does one know if the bar is worn out?
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 08, 2019, 04:08:27 PM
Captains post made me think, if the teeth are not all the same length would that contribute to a rough board?  The teeth and rakers are sharp and set correct ( I believe :D ) but when sharpening a chain some teeth are duller or roller over a bit so I have to sharpen them down a bit more so they are not as long. 

I'm thinking about it like a table saw blade, if one tooth was offset a bit more than the other I'd imagine you'd get a groove every time it went through the cut.. I'm realizing the same would be true with a chainsaw chain?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 08, 2019, 04:16:55 PM
I use a no pin Wagner.  if you are near the desert, you can prob. get down to 19 to 12 % MC air drying.
Googled wagner pinless moisture meter and the prices made me  :o :o  I was thinking around $50, those were a bit more than that  :D  I suppose if I continue down this path I'll have to get good equipment but at the moment that's more than my poor wallet can handle.

I've been doing a bit of googling and it seems like if I want to build furniture or anything of the like that below 10% is what I'm shooting for?

At the moment I'm not sure a kiln is in my future, at least not my near future. Is it possible to build nice furniture with air dried wood? 

I'm currently thinking if I can get a supply of logs I'll have to sticker and dry them outside with corrugated sheet metal on the top and a platform raised a bit off the ground (I'm thinking treated wood frame floor of sorts on cinder blocks or something of the kind) to help keep the rain and sun off them a bit. I don't expect to come into any amazing whack of logs, just a few here and a few there from neighbors/friends/tree services/wood sprites that are moving to the city ;). I have done a lot of lurking around the forum on the subject but it's a lot of info to try and digest in a short amount of time  :P :P or I'm over complicating it   ;D

Much as I really want to build a shed or other structure, with lack of funds and the weather becoming winter. it's not going to happen if I'm being honest. Gotta figure out how to do this on a shoe string budget... gotta enjoy the challenge!  8)

Anyhow, lunch break is over, back to work

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 08, 2019, 05:55:39 PM
Brandon, first know that I have read every one of your posts and enjoyed your discovery, enthusiasm, and joy. Some of your posts are the bright spot in my day. So understand I am talking to you as a friend, not a critic. I am on your side and want to continue to see you have fun.
 I see a lot of myself in the things you do and the way you think it through. You are a planner and thinker, as I am. I believe it is good to have a plan, but at this point you are ruining your own fun by thinking too much. ;D 
 You are on a fun trip, but sometimes you have to just wake up in the morning and see what this 'new town' has to offer you. Work your way through the steps and learn as you go what it is you want. Make something small and see how it turns out. You may decide to alter direction along the way. I was in the EXACT same spot a year ago and I am still making changes as I go. (Moving my entire mill to a new location is a big job for me alone, especially as the weather degrades. Was it dumb to be where I started? No, it made sense then. It no longer makes sense, hence the move and lost time. I learned and grew a bit.)

 When you say "make furniture" do you mean rustic stuff, or finely joined and finished stuff? Finely joined means KD lumber to me. Rustic stuff has a life and can 'move' during it's life without issue. Air dried, or even less can work fine for rustic. I would start there, it's a good challenge and will give you an idea of how your skills match up with the task.

 CSM work is tough. Getting through a log takes time. I have a stationary bandsaw and I still wound up with a bunch of logs I am trying to get through. But as you know, working alone takes a LOT more time. So a few logs, in dribs and drabs may be all that you can handle. Right now I have 3 or 4 I need to mill up before I begin moving the saw. I am trying to decide what to mill these logs to because I don't yet know what I am doing with them. You could easily wind up in the same situation with just a few logs.

 I buy cheap tools until I really learn what I need, then get good ones. I bought a very cheap moisture meter on fleabay ($15) and thought it would at least give me an idea. I brought some wood to a friend for planing and he insisted that nothing went in his planer that was over 15%. Mine said 14% and his said 13%. His cost $300., mine cost $15. and my confidence is higher.

Relax, enjoy the ride. YMMV :D ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 08, 2019, 07:26:28 PM
Brandon, first know that I have read every one of your posts and enjoyed your discovery, enthusiasm, and joy. Some of your posts are the bright spot in my day. So understand I am talking to you as a friend, not a critic. I am on your side and want to continue to see you have fun.


@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) Thank you for your kind words, I didn't take anything as a criticism :)

I see a lot of myself in the things you do and the way you think it through. You are a planner and thinker, as I am. I believe it is good to have a plan, but at this point you are ruining your own fun by thinking too much.  


Heh, you've got my number for sure! I do often overthink things. Thanks for the reminder it's supposed to be fun!

You are on a fun trip, but sometimes you have to just wake up in the morning and see what this 'new town' has to offer you. Work your way through the steps and learn as you go what it is you want. Make something small and see how it turns out. You may decide to alter direction along the way. I was in the EXACT same spot a year ago and I am still making changes as I go. (Moving my entire mill to a new location is a big job for me alone, especially as the weather degrades. Was it dumb to be where I started? No, it made sense then. It no longer makes sense, hence the move and lost time. I learned and grew a bit.)


I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  

When you say "make furniture" do you mean rustic stuff, or finely joined and finished stuff? Finely joined means KD lumber to me. Rustic stuff has a life and can 'move' during it's life without issue. Air dried, or even less can work fine for rustic. I would start there, it's a good challenge and will give you an idea of how your skills match up with the task.


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!

CSM work is tough. Getting through a log takes time. I have a stationary bandsaw and I still wound up with a bunch of logs I am trying to get through. But as you know, working alone takes a LOT more time. So a few logs, in dribs and drabs may be all that you can handle. Right now I have 3 or 4 I need to mill up before I begin moving the saw. I am trying to decide what to mill these logs to because I don't yet know what I am doing with them. You could easily wind up in the same situation with just a few logs.


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.

I buy cheap tools until I really learn what I need, then get good ones. I bought a very cheap moisture meter on fleabay ($15) and thought it would at least give me an idea. I brought some wood to a friend for planing and he insisted that nothing went in his planer that was over 15%. Mine said 14% and his said 13%. His cost $300., mine cost $15. and my confidence is higher.


Good point, I'll try a cheapy model when I'm ready for one and see what I really need and then go from there.

Basically I need to stop overthinking it, accept that "mistakes" will be made which is ok (provided they don't involve some horrid injury) and just enjoy the learning process :P
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 08, 2019, 07:55:30 PM

I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.


I picked a couple of your points out to respond to, but I am not so good at the fancy quoting as you are.
 First, there really aren't and 'mistakes' as I see it, they are all learning experiences and add to you skill and knowledge.
Search for "benches" here are the FF. there are a LOT of us building them and learning and trading ideas as we go. There are some in my long thread.
You can grab one of those boards anytime and get to work on it after you find some ideas. @WV Sawmiller (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=28064) @arkansas (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=5293) and @doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) and others have some good ones in their post history. I did one from green wood back in June and sealed it before it could dry. Gave it to a neighbor, been watching it for movement, nothing yet.
 Funny thing about that cheap MC meter I have, after I got it, I started sticking it in everything. Sometimes I would stick a butt log 5 minutes after I dropped it. I learned a lot about trees and logs. I marked logs with the initial MC and would watch them. I would go back and stick the same log for weeks after I cut it just to sees how things progressed, then when I milled it, then as it was air drying. It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. :D ;D I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club.
Next for me is a metal detector. I'll let you know how it works out. I'm worried about going cheap on that one.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 08, 2019, 09:36:59 PM
"It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. (http://forestryforum.com/board/Smileys/default/cheesy.gif) (http://forestryforum.com/board/Smileys/default/grin.gif) I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club."

I prefer a moisture meter and 2 beers for entertainment!
@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) @ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620)  :D :) 8) smiley_beertoast
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 07:08:06 AM

I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.


I picked a couple of your points out to respond to, but I am not so good at the fancy quoting as you are.
 First, there really aren't and 'mistakes' as I see it, they are all learning experiences and add to you skill and knowledge.
Search for "benches" here are the FF. there are a LOT of us building them and learning and trading ideas as we go. There are some in my long thread.
You can grab one of those boards anytime and get to work on it after you find some ideas. @WV Sawmiller (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=28064) @arkansas (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=5293) and @doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) and others have some good ones in their post history. I did one from green wood back in June and sealed it before it could dry. Gave it to a neighbor, been watching it for movement, nothing yet.
 Funny thing about that cheap MC meter I have, after I got it, I started sticking it in everything. Sometimes I would stick a butt log 5 minutes after I dropped it. I learned a lot about trees and logs. I marked logs with the initial MC and would watch them. I would go back and stick the same log for weeks after I cut it just to sees how things progressed, then when I milled it, then as it was air drying. It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. :D ;D I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club.
Next for me is a metal detector. I'll let you know how it works out. I'm worried about going cheap on that one.
@Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103)  I used the multi quote button, it was an experiment to see if it would do what I thought it would and it did but I'm not sure I really liked it. 
You are absolutely right, there are no mistakes. I have a bit of a perfectionist streak and sometimes I let it get the better of me, as though somehow I'll get everything right the first time  ::) ::) It does take a lot of the fun out of things at times. Instead of doing that I really like your attitude about it all, try it, see what happens and learn from the results. 
HAHAHA the image I have of you with that moisture meter sticking it everywhere is like a kid with a new magnifying glass examining everything, just a fun image!  :) :)  Really I like your attitude for learning and exploration!
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o  So far I haven't found anything like that the hard way thankfully but, not trying to sound negative or fatalistic but just figure it's how the odds work, I'm sure I will at some point since I'm working with yard trees. 
Thanks again for the pep talk!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 07:10:46 AM
"It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. (http://forestryforum.com/board/Smileys/default/cheesy.gif) (http://forestryforum.com/board/Smileys/default/grin.gif) I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club."

I prefer a moisture meter and 2 beers for entertainment! @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) @ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620)  :D :) 8) smiley_beertoast
@doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) how many beers before you check the beers with the moisture meter?  ;D ;D
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 07:14:52 AM
Found an ad for a local tree service offering free logs. Texted and called yesterday but no reply yet but keeping my fingers crossed they'll contact me back. Would be cool to pick up a few more logs to mill  8)  If this one doesn't pan out it's no big deal. A couple of my neighbors work for construction companies and I'm going to talk to them and see if they take trees down and if so if they'd be willing to send the logs my way. 


Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 09, 2019, 08:22:20 AM
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o
From what I have learned here on the FF, you want to stay away from the pinpoint as a first detector, they are too focused. You have to go over every inch of the log, all around. You want something more broad spectrum first to locate metal, then if you want, work on it with a finer point. You can search the subject here on the FF, there is a good discussion somewhere, but at the time I read it, that was not an urgent consideration. Now that I have found barbed wire (the hard way) I am re-thinking.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 09, 2019, 08:40:41 AM
Brandon  I purchased a cheapie used  HF metal detector from ebay.  It works fine,  mostly it's to check the utility poles I've sawn and any town logs I saw.  I have found some stuff I didn't see with it so it paid for itself in two uses.  Yes a basic moisture detector is on my list too to see where I'm at with some bench slabs.  The rest of what I've sawn is siding and structural stuff the will air dry for two years or so til I get to those projects.

That tree service  deal  might surprise you at how much wood you'll be blessed with.   You'll be looking for an empty spot on the outside of town before too long.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 09, 2019, 08:42:56 AM
The Lumber Wizard is a good starting point for metal detectors.  Lumber Wizard (https://www.amazon.com/Lumber-Wizard-Laser-Metal-Detector/dp/B0059WA216/ref=asc_df_B0059WA216/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309918444673&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1764849405361385771&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9008421&hvtargid=pla-568445988224&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=60522766526&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=309918444673&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1764849405361385771&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9008421&hvtargid=pla-568445988224)

Some people use the type used for finding artifacts in the ground.  Some use both.  X-ray is the only fool-proof method, but that's a bit pricey.

A brand new blade is the most reliable way to find metal in a log for most of us bandmill operators.   :D :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: lxskllr on November 09, 2019, 08:58:59 AM
For sealing the ends, you might want to consider the dregs of scented candles. The cheapies usually don't burn fully, so you can use the remainder as a sealer. Make the wife happy too. For multiquoting, IMO it's easier to quote the whole mess, then add quote tags to break it up, and delete stuff that isn't needed.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 09, 2019, 09:03:01 AM
the big service always tries to give the wood away, and my experience when I have spoke with them is that they hear it all the time, and then people do not show up.  so they are prob. not as excited as you are.  I have several small one man tree guys, and it is like Christmas when they text a pic.  One guy will drop them off if he has the equipment. or I will pick it up.  that is where I got the locust to make my log cradle to cut firewood, and the one that I found concrete down the center.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:10:34 AM
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o
From what I have learned here on the FF, you want to stay away from the pinpoint as a first detector, they are too focused. You have to go over every inch of the log, all around. You want something more broad spectrum first to locate metal, then if you want, work on it with a finer point. You can search the subject here on the FF, there is a good discussion somewhere, but at the time I read it, that was not an urgent consideration. Now that I have found barbed wire (the hard way) I am re-thinking.
I will do a search as you say, thanks for pointing it out :)

I ordered a Dr.Meter MD912 off eBay, had a $10 coupon so it only cost me $7 :)  Should be here in a couple weeks. 

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:14:52 AM
Brandon  I purchased a cheapie used  HF metal detector from ebay.  It works fine,  mostly it's to check the utility poles I've sawn and any town logs I saw.  I have found some stuff I didn't see with it so it paid for itself in two uses.  Yes a basic moisture detector is on my list too to see where I'm at with some bench slabs.  The rest of what I've sawn is siding and structural stuff the will air dry for two years or so til I get to those projects.

That tree service  deal  might surprise you at how much wood you'll be blessed with.   You'll be looking for an empty spot on the outside of town before too long.
I looked at HF and their basic detector is priced such that it'd only have to save two chains to pay for itself. I think I'll be saving my pennies and waiting for a coupon and will have to pick one up.  I don't expect I'll be sawing utility poles but since so far all my logs have been yard logs I think it'd be a good investment :)
No word back from the tree service, I may try and call them one more time after work just to see. I don't have the money for any land anywhere so I hope it stays within what I can handle, but I suppose an excess of logs isn't such a bad problem to have :D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:18:01 AM
For sealing the ends, you might want to consider the dregs of scented candles. The cheapies usually don't burn fully, so you can use the remainder as a sealer. Make the wife happy too. 
Oddly enough my wife doesn't do scented candles so I have to buy the wax. It's really not very expensive IMO.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:22:01 AM
the big service always tries to give the wood away, and my experience when I have spoke with them is that they hear it all the time, and then people do not show up.  so they are prob. not as excited as you are.  I have several small one man tree guys, and it is like Christmas when they text a pic.  One guy will drop them off if he has the equipment. or I will pick it up.  that is where I got the locust to make my log cradle to cut firewood, and the one that I found concrete down the center.
Good perspective to keep in mind when dealing with the tree guys, thanks Doc :)  It'd be pretty awesome to get in good enough with one or two such that they'd text me a "interested in this one?" pic and message, that would be like Christmas!  8)  I figure it'll take some time to cultivate contacts... I'd like to say I'm in no hurry but y'all know I'd be lying, I'm chomping at the bit!  ;D ;D  But I'm trying to have patience and as OG said, just see what comes my way and enjoy the ride.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 09, 2019, 12:01:05 PM
ManjiSann,
If you are planning (hoping) to get some bigger logs, you are going to need a way to move them.  You are gonna need a log arch of some sort.  In keeping with your free/scrap mantra, here is something I made (and remade) to move my timbers and lumber but was originally built to move some redwood logs.

A simple log arch... (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=66160.msg1673371#msg1673371)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:36:35 PM
ManjiSann,
If you are planning (hoping) to get some bigger logs, you are going to need a way to move them.  You are gonna need a log arch of some sort.  In keeping with your free/scrap mantra, here is something I made (and remade) to move my timbers and lumber but was originally built to move some redwood logs.

A simple log arch... (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=66160.msg1673371#msg1673371)
@ljohnsaw (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20640) That's friggen amazing! How much weight have you had on it?  Love the simplicity of the design and the adaptability.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 09, 2019, 11:46:13 PM
I've loaded way too much on it! :D The old, little one would carry a 8x12x14' pine post no problem as long as the tires were aired up.  My new one I have only used it to carry wood from my SkyTrak to my wood piles inside my basement.  I've loaded up three or four 2x10x16' green pine boards.  Quite heavy!  Its a little tippy - need to make it wider.

To use it to move logs, you drive over your log, lift the handle up until the lower crossbar hits the log.  Strap it with ratchet straps or some chain.  Pull the handle back down and haul it away.  You can put a ratchet strap around the handle end and the log to keep it stable and easy to move.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 09, 2019, 11:54:02 PM
I talked to the tree service fellow and gave him my contact info. He said he'd let me know if he's taking a tree down on my day off and I can come by and they'll help load it in my truck... I need a bigger truck  ;D He said he'd taken down a nice 3' DBH burr oak last week... I shed a couple tears over that one.

Since fortune favors the prepared (that's the saying right  ;)) I finally figured out what I'd do with this large pallet I never got around to cutting up

I layed an old tarp on the ground as a moisture barrier and some keystones I had lying around and leveled it all as best I could

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0270.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573360791)

Put the pallet on

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0271.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573360883)

Now I have somewhere to put the lumber I cut if/when I get logs from the sources I'm hoping to cultivate  ;D  I figure when I have the logs is probably not the best time to be trying to figure out where to put stuff as I'll want to be milling so I'm trying to think ahead a bit. As I've mentioned, I'd love to build a shed eventually but right now this is more my budget and speed  :) :) I'll keep an eye out for something I can use as a roof/cover, hopefully some corrugated tin roofing will find its way into my truck bed  :)

I thought I was done for the day, but ljohnsaw's log arch got me thinking and I started surfing the local ads for free stuff hoping to find some wheels or something for a log arch. So far nothing on that front but I did find...

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0272.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573361102)

A FREE ALUMINUM LADDER!!!!  Well most of it. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0273.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573361151)

One section is busted, hence why it was free. Both sections look pretty straight though so I'm planning to use this as the guide for my chainsaw mill. Now I won't have to mess with 2x4's as much. The large section I believe is 12' the broken section is a little less than half that so I figure between the two I should be set for anything I expect I'll handle  8) 8)

All in all a good day!

Hope everyone has a safe and blessed weekend!

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 10, 2019, 12:02:37 AM
A FREE ALUMINUM LADDER!!!!
 
SCORE!  I count 16 rungs on the big section in the picture so it is at least a 16' ladder (32' designation).
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 10, 2019, 08:44:31 AM
get some plastic and watch the timbergreen farms simple cycle solar kiln video.  If you cannot do the former...you still have the ladder!!! 8) 8) 8) :) :) :) what too early?
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 09:02:55 AM
A FREE ALUMINUM LADDER!!!!

SCORE!  I count 16 rungs on the big section in the picture so it is at least a 16' ladder (32' designation).
I think the sticker on the side said 24' ladder but I'll check. Whatever the length it was a great deal for the price  8) 8)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 09:05:13 AM
get some plastic and watch the timbergreen farms simple cycle solar kiln video.  If you cannot do the former...you still have the ladder!!! 8) 8) 8) :) :) :) what too early?
Only have a few minutes this morning so I quickly checked out their website, looks like a great idea and should be in my shoestring budget  8) 8) Thanks for pointing me in that direction!
Maybe my brain isn't up to speed yet... too early for what?  :-[
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 10:10:04 AM
@ljohnsaw (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20640) good call! You are right, it was a 32' ladder, so 16' sections. I'm impressed!

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0274.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573398581)

On a side note, why is everything rated for 250lbs? Most people I know are over that weight limit (including me  :'( ). 

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 10, 2019, 10:16:26 AM
You''ve had a pretty good two days, dont fret that oak tree more will show up. I will say that a 36 in Burr Oak will be a challenge to do anything  with, (very heavy) i would quarter or mill it in place, it before you tried to move it.  I would need to borrow the neighbor's  wheel loader and forks as it is way to much for my tractors  to move. 
Nice haul on the ladder section if it's pretty straight you are set.
I'm on call this weekend in the office waiting for someone  to show up from 40 miles away so catching up on your  adventures  made this time pass much better. :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 10, 2019, 10:25:51 AM
did you get a back story on the ladder sheared in half?  most ratings can be pushed a bit, but I would not double it!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 03:34:31 PM
You''ve had a pretty good two days, dont fret that oak tree more will show up. I will say that a 36 in Burr Oak will be a challenge to do anything  with, (very heavy) i would quarter or mill it in place, it before you tried to move it.  I would need to borrow the neighbor's  wheel loader and forks as it is way to much for my tractors  to move.
Nice haul on the ladder section if it's pretty straight you are set.
I'm on call this weekend in the office waiting for someone  to show up from 40 miles away so catching up on your  adventures  made this time pass much better. :)
I'm not really that broke up about the oak, just sad to think it went to firewood. You're right though, there's no way I'd have been able to move it with my little S-10 even if the tree service was able to lift it in for me... if was more than 4 feet long it'd likely have folded my poor truck into a taco given the weight.
Both sections of the ladder are pretty straight so as you say, I think I'm pretty set :) Now to figure out where to store it  :D
Glad I could entertain  8)
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 03:41:36 PM
did you get a back story on the ladder sheared in half?  most ratings can be pushed a bit, but I would not double it!
Fellow said it was in the house when he bought it. Would be interesting to know how it was broke as both sections are pretty straight. Oh well, one more of those mysteries I'll likely never know the answer to  ???
I don't plan to use it as a ladder, just commenting on the weight limits of things  ;D
On a totally different note, spoke with my neighbor that runs a construction crew and let him know I'm interested in any tree trunks they take out. He's a good neighbor so I'm sure if he remembers he'll hit me up. 
Fingers are crossed I get a text from the tree guy on Wednesday for a log or two  :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JoshNZ on November 10, 2019, 04:21:11 PM
You'll have to weld the ladder sections together along a straight edge surely? They're not much good to you in two sections, for logs over 16" at least. Unless you fancy carrying a string line etc and some clever mounts
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 08:42:04 PM
You'll have to weld the ladder sections together along a straight edge surely? They're not much good to you in two sections, for logs over 16" at least. Unless you fancy carrying a string line etc and some clever mounts
I don't expect to be handling logs much over 10' in length as I don't have the equipment to handle any heavy weight (10' is very optimistic in reality but I'm trying to not limit my thinking  :) )
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 10, 2019, 09:07:21 PM
Been mulling over what @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) said about rustic furniture and Adirondack chairs came to mind, getting a bit excited about the idea. 

What other styles of building would be considered rustic and would allow for the movement of air dried wood? Not sure what search terms to use, "Rustic" seems to mean different things to different people. I saw some "Farm" style stuff that looked interesting but if I search for that exactly then you end up with all sorts of stuff. I'm fine continuing to search on my own but figured I'd ask and see what everyone else has seen and done  :)

I'm not ruling out the kiln
@doc henderson (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) posted about, I'm thinking I'll likely do that as well but I am liking the idea of doing something rustic for some patio furniture  :)  One thing the wife and I are really hoping to build in our back yard is an awning and extended porch area and I think some Adirondack chairs and/or other rustic style furniture would be a lot of fun to build  8)  

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 10, 2019, 09:39:31 PM
Been mulling over what @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) said about rustic furniture and Adirondack chairs came to mind, getting a bit excited about the idea.

What other styles of building would be considered rustic and would allow for the movement of air dried wood? Not sure what search terms to use, "Rustic" seems to mean different things to different people.
Go back to my earlier reply (55, I think) and look at the things those guy are building. Simple, functional, yet elegant stuff. Don't overthink. Bench with 4 legs, start with that. After that the path will reveal itself.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 10, 2019, 09:54:42 PM
search, rustic, log furniture, live edge.  select images and if you see something you like, click it and it will head you down that road. the plastic kiln just shows you a way to keep stuff going this winter.  until you have a shed or a kiln.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: miro on November 10, 2019, 10:45:49 PM
I have been following this thread with great interest. It follows a very similar trajectory that I had. I got into CSM after seeing it in Fine Woodworking about 40 years ago.

Ultimately I designed and built most of my own furniture in colonial American style ( 1760-ish)- lots of carving -mainly walnut and black cherry etc, 
I ended up also forging my own carving chisels because I couldn't afford the store bought ones.

As for drying - outdoor gets you down to about 15% and then indoors to get it to 6-8%  - ready to work. I did my own re-sawing on an old Rockwell bandsaw.

I coated my ends with several coats of the cheapest latex paint I had - colours indicated when I sawed the trees. I've sawn maple, black cherry, walnut, birch, basswood, but not much softwood - not really worth  the effort.

I learned to carefully sharpen - got good at it.

Eventually had too much wood in storage so I stopped milling.
My latest CSM adventure was 2 years ago -  walnut tree that I had planted over 40 years ago - sad to do it, but it started to be a hazard. But I DID get the lumber out of it.
Maybe I make my own coffin out of it - delicately and generously carved :-} .
miro
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on November 11, 2019, 05:59:28 AM
@miro (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=23241) went to your gallery to see if you had pictures of some of the furniture you made. :(  I did see lumber and a CSM.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 11, 2019, 08:03:45 AM
Been mulling over what @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) said about rustic furniture and Adirondack chairs came to mind, getting a bit excited about the idea.

What other styles of building would be considered rustic and would allow for the movement of air dried wood? Not sure what search terms to use, "Rustic" seems to mean different things to different people.
Go back to my earlier reply (55, I think) and look at the things those guy are building. Simple, functional, yet elegant stuff. Don't overthink. Bench with 4 legs, start with that. After that the path will reveal itself.
OG, thanks, I'll look at it more closely. I remember the benches you and WV Sawmiller were posting about, don't recall seeing anything else but I must not have read enough (or my memory is even worse than I thought :(.)  I often want to jump right to all the super amazing advanced stuff, and I've pulled it off once or twice in my life but more often than not I lack the skills and knowledge so things don't go quite how I envisioned and I get frustrated or discouraged. So I will endeavor to take your advice and start with something simple like the log bench or similar. As you say, simple can still be elegant and I'm usually more of a function over form sort of person :)
"Don't overthink"  HAHAHA that'll be the real challenge for me now won't it  ;)  I think that will end up on my tombstone "He lived so long because he overthought his ending" or something of the like  :D :D
Brandon  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 11, 2019, 08:04:40 AM
search, rustic, log furniture, live edge.  select images and if you see something you like, click it and it will head you down that road. the plastic kiln just shows you a way to keep stuff going this winter.  until you have a shed or a kiln.
Doc, thanks for the suggested search terms, I didn't think of "live edge" so I'll look for that as well. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 11, 2019, 08:17:45 AM
I have been following this thread with great interest. It follows a very similar trajectory that I had. I got into CSM after seeing it in Fine Woodworking about 40 years ago.

Ultimately I designed and built most of my own furniture in colonial American style ( 1760-ish)- lots of carving -mainly walnut and black cherry etc,  
I ended up also forging my own carving chisels because I couldn't afford the store bought ones.

As for drying - outdoor gets you down to about 15% and then indoors to get it to 6-8%  - ready to work. I did my own re-sawing on an old Rockwell bandsaw.

I coated my ends with several coats of the cheapest latex paint I had - colours indicated when I sawed the trees. I've sawn maple, black cherry, walnut, birch, basswood, but not much softwood - not really worth  the effort.

I learned to carefully sharpen - got good at it.

Eventually had too much wood in storage so I stopped milling.
My latest CSM adventure was 2 years ago -  walnut tree that I had planted over 40 years ago - sad to do it, but it started to be a hazard. But I DID get the lumber out of it.
Maybe I make my own coffin out of it - delicately and generously carved :-} .
miro
Miro, thanks for taking the time to post about your adventure!  Not just to Miro but to all of you who started this adventure before the internet, my hat's off to you! I remember as a youth (I'd say as a kid but I'm still a kid in my head  8) ) there were so many things I wanted to learn how to do but I couldn't figure out how to for lack of information. The library often didn't have the books I would have liked. So for anyone that was a DIY person before the internet and things like this forum and youtube, again, mad respect, you guys are the true geniuses! Anyhow, back to Miro's post.
Would you post some pics of your carving chisels and a bit about how you forged them? I've watched Forged in Fire and think it'd be awesome to do some of my own forging/blacksmithing but have no solid plans to at the moment. Don't want to have to many irons in the fire as they say, but would still love to learn more. 
I've been using wax for coating my end grains but I may try paint for the biggest reason being I can write on it. Might be very educational to write things like beginning dimensions, MC, dates, etc on the end grain and then see how the board changes as it dries. Old Greenhorn got me thinking about learning and experimenting. The wax doesn't allow for writing and it clouds over a bit so if I wrote on the board before applying the wax it'd still be hard to read. 
Bummer about having to remove the walnut tree, but as you said, you got the wood and I'm sure you'll make something amazing out of it  :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: captain_crunch on November 11, 2019, 01:56:46 PM
File the teeth 90* instead of 35* you wont believe the difference and dont see saw the saw 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 11, 2019, 09:05:19 PM
Decided to trim the busted part of the ladder up

Makes you wonder how the ladder broke yet the remaining parts remained as straight as they are

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0277.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573524037)

Trimmed the busted part and filed it a bit to try and knock off the sharp edges in an effort to reduce injury in the future

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0278.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573524179)

Don't think I'll get to any milling tomorrow but hopefully Wednesday I'll either mill some of the bits I have already or maybe I'll get that magic text asking me to come pic a log up  :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 07:36:24 PM
Didn't think I'd get to anything today due to some stupid court stuff taking up my morning but had scheduled the day off work and decided to not go in and have a Mental Health day  :)

I cut down a 45 yo apricot tree near the beginning of all my adventures in June. Sadly I cut it into firewood lengths as at the time I had no idea I'd be getting the Husky and building a CSM. I remember when I cut it down I thought "Dang, wish I could mill this into lumber as there's some beautiful grain". So today I took a part of it and decided to mill it a bit. The little section was so light that I had a hard time keeping it still, the chain kept moving it so the cut was a bit rougher... that's my story and I'm sticking to it  :D :D

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0282.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573604846)

I tossed the pieces back in the wood pile in frustration but after thinking a bit I got them back out. I really would like to try cutting up some of the stuff I have even if it's smallish, I think it'd be good practice and a good learning experience as to what I can expect to find in a given configuration of wood. I figure I need to build some sort of holding jig or clamp system out of 2x4's to keep the logs stable and in place.

I think these two would yield some nice pieces

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0283.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573605055)

I've got a combination of cherry, apricot, pear in this pile. While not long many are pretty wide so if I can figure a way to hold them I'll cut them

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0284.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573605233)

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 12, 2019, 07:45:34 PM
You've got some nice material there for barbecue cutting boards. Dry them, peel the bark, round the corners and sand them flat. A little tung oil and you are good to go. Everything has a purpose.
 You could also make little cocktail tables. just 3 legs might do. I sure would not burn them up.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 12, 2019, 08:13:20 PM
I like that cutting board idea, those will look nifty all shined up. No idea Apricot looked that nice.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 08:49:59 PM
You've got some nice material there for barbecue cutting boards. Dry them, peel the bark, round the corners and sand them flat. A little tung oil and you are good to go. Everything has a purpose.
 You could also make little cocktail tables. just 3 legs might do. I sure would not burn them up.
OG, Great idea! I'll seal the ends and let them dry for a bit then turn one into a BBQ cutting board!  I have the other half of the crotch or whatever it was that these came from. I'll have to mill it out as well :)  Maybe I can mill that one a bit thicker to turn into a little table top.

The more I think on it the more a little three legged table would be fun to build. Maybe some adirondack chairs and little tables next to them to hold little drinks  8) 8) since everything is made of wood it'll all match  ;D

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 09:00:13 PM
I like that cutting board idea, those will look nifty all shined up. No idea Apricot looked that nice.
I've only cut down the one apricot tree so I can only comment on it but it was very pretty wood. It was a beautiful tree, hated to see it cut down. 
Short story, got a call one Saturday from my wife asking if I'd loan her friends husband my chainsaw because his shorted out while cutting down his tree. I thought about it and said no but I'd be happy to help them cut it down when I was off work that evening. Got off work, expecting a little 8" diameter tree... nope thing was over 20" at the base, branches were bigger than a lot of fruit tree trunks I'd seen. At the time I only had the first little Poulan saw so we cut it into short sections we could easily carry and I brought them home with some vague notion about using them for smoking. Wish I'd had the CSM, woulda loved to mill the trunk and a few of those branches. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 12, 2019, 09:02:51 PM
Google "charcuterie board (https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=charcuterie+board&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8)" for ideas, apparently it's the latest thing.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 12, 2019, 09:32:09 PM
See? Now aren't you glad you didn't throw them in the fire? There's a guy around here who makes cutting boards out of his scraps, he glues the up from squares of various woods, like a checker board. He has sold 50 of them in recent months for over 100 bucks a pop. I have been thinking a bit lately about marketable items so when I saw that wood, that is what came to mind. Let's see how it goes, keep us in the loop.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 10:25:54 PM
Google "charcuterie board (https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=charcuterie+board&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8)" for ideas, apparently it's the latest thing.
Hilltop, I clicked the link and basically is that fancy language for cutting board?  :D :D  Seriously though, I'll look into it a bit more in depth. Would be cool to make small stuff that sells or at the very least to give to my neighbors.

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 10:32:16 PM
See? Now aren't you glad you didn't throw them in the fire? There's a guy around here who makes cutting boards out of his scraps, he glues the up from squares of various woods, like a checker board. He has sold 50 of them in recent months for over 100 bucks a pop. I have been thinking a bit lately about marketable items so when I saw that wood, that is what came to mind. Let's see how it goes, keep us in the loop.
Y'all are just full of great ideas!  I'll have to research the proper way to seal cutting boards as I know one of the risks with a wooden cutting board is stuff getting in the pores. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 12, 2019, 10:51:41 PM
Didn't feel like sitting around watching TV all evening so went in the basement to cut more stickers in preparation for the bit of milling I'm hoping to do tomorrow. Decided to empty the shop vac as it wasn't sucking very well... heh solved that mystery at least  :o

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0286.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573615313)

Cut more stickers, super exciting... not

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0288.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573616366)

I'll cut them to length tomorrow once I decide what I'll mill.

It'll be cool when I've dried so much wood that I can start reusing stickers  8) 8)

Decided to add more stickers and straps to the pear boards and I'm glad I did. A few were starting to cup a bit and a few bow a bit. I think the thinner stickers on the bottom flexed so much from the straps tightening that it allowed or caused some of the problems. Switched the bottom ones to sections of 2x4 and strapped it all back up and it's looking good.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0287.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573616983)

 Wish I'd weighed and measured a few before they started to dry, would be interesting to see the different numbers now as I swear they're noticeably lighter. Can't wait for the moisture meter to arrive  :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JoshNZ on November 13, 2019, 05:36:53 AM
You need to get a lathe =D. The short knotty ugly pieces that you don't want to mill, love going on a faceplate!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 13, 2019, 07:20:03 AM
Y'all are just full of great ideas!  I'll have to research the proper way to seal cutting boards as I know one of the risks with a wooden cutting board is stuff getting in the pores.

Brandon
Tung oil is likely what you want. Search for it here on the FF. Here is one link: http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=105659.msg1651380#msg1651380 (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=105659.msg1651380#msg1651380)
Works for me.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:30:36 AM
You need to get a lathe =D. The short knotty ugly pieces that you don't want to mill, love going on a faceplate!
There's an idea  :)  I don't know where I'd put a lathe in my shop, it's rather packed at the moment. If nothing else I have a friend that is planning to get a lathe, I'll have to see if he'd like the pieces  :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:33:54 AM
Y'all are just full of great ideas!  I'll have to research the proper way to seal cutting boards as I know one of the risks with a wooden cutting board is stuff getting in the pores.

Brandon
Tung oil is likely what you want. Search for it here on the FF. Here is one link: http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=105659.msg1651380#msg1651380 (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=105659.msg1651380#msg1651380)
Works for me.
If stores sell tung oil, do they also sell elbow grease?  :D :D :D  Wish I could find a store that also sold ambition!
Seriously though, thank you for the information and taking the time to find and post the link. I need to set aside an hour or two a week to just read the links and info provided and delve deeper into all of this  :P  So much to learn... there should be a Forestry Forum degree offered  ;D 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 13, 2019, 10:36:07 AM
some of us have earned the forestry forum "BS"  degree  :D  @tule peak timber (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=25190) @Old Greenhorn (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=42103) @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: tule peak timber on November 13, 2019, 10:46:47 AM
Bachelor of Sawdust ?????????
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Ed_K on November 13, 2019, 10:51:22 AM
 1st pic reply 104 would make some nice wall clocks.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 13, 2019, 11:30:01 AM
Pretty soon we're going to see  Manjisann's today's happy customer posts.  ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JoshNZ on November 13, 2019, 01:35:02 PM
You need to get a lathe =D. The short knotty ugly pieces that you don't want to mill, love going on a faceplate!
There's an idea  :)  I don't know where I'd put a lathe in my shop, it's rather packed at the moment. If nothing else I have a friend that is planning to get a lathe, I'll have to see if he'd like the pieces  :)
Brandon

Failing that you can always sell turning blanks. If you cut smaller 2-3" slabs into round discs then dry them, wood turner's will pay for them, over here at least. Particularly figured stuff. Burls and crotches etc
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:02:47 PM
Bachelor of Sawdust ?????????
Masters of Man Glitter  8) 8) 8)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:03:55 PM
1st pic reply 104 would make some nice wall clocks.
My wife saw them and suggested the same thing! Great minds think alike it would seem  ;D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:04:19 PM
Pretty soon we're going to see  Manjisann's today's happy customer posts.  ;)
Oooooh That'd be awesome!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:05:48 PM
You need to get a lathe =D. The short knotty ugly pieces that you don't want to mill, love going on a faceplate!
There's an idea  :)  I don't know where I'd put a lathe in my shop, it's rather packed at the moment. If nothing else I have a friend that is planning to get a lathe, I'll have to see if he'd like the pieces  :)
Brandon

Failing that you can always sell turning blanks. If you cut smaller 2-3" slabs into round discs then dry them, wood turner's will pay for them, over here at least. Particularly figured stuff. Burls and crotches etc
I've thought of trying that. Sounds like I should really look into it.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 13, 2019, 08:22:38 PM
Milled a few more pieces.

This is the other half of the nice ones from the other day. This side was laying on the dirt for a few months so it has a bit more character  ;D

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0289.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573693740)

Once cut though it's very pretty I think. I'm excited to see what it'll look like sanded/planed and with some Tung Oil 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0290.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573693778)

I do need to come up with some sort of clamp/jig or something, the small pieces don't like to stay still once the chain hits them.

Cut up another larger piece, it was heavy enough it stayed still decently. I was feeling kinda lazy so I cut the flat side with the saw instead of mounting a guide

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0292.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573693919)

I think it has a pretty color and should look nice sanded and oiled

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0293.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573694069)

This one needed a bit of a trim so I knocked a few of the branch pieces off

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0294.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573694201)

Ready for milling

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0295.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573694122)

I'm not sure what I'll do with the pieces. The milling was a bit twisted as I wasn't paying as close attention to the jig hugging the log as I should have been. it's not severe and might even straighten in the drying...

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0297.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573693720)

All in all a productive couple of hours.  Hopefully I can get some logs soon, or I guess I can free hand mill some of the smaller bits 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 13, 2019, 08:54:16 PM
I do need to come up with some sort of clamp/jig or something, the small pieces don't like to stay still once the chain hits them.
 
If you are using your short ladder as a work bench, you could use some pipe straps (that look like the ohm symbol) around the ladder rungs and screw into your log.  If you are using some 2x4 or 2x6 boards on your saw horses, just screw up through them into your log.  Probably only need screws long enough to bite in an inch.  Just don't cut down too far!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 13, 2019, 10:14:40 PM
Make another mill for your saw, use tracks (can be made of wood) and a frame to hold the saw at the desired height.

You know it's going to happen eventually, might as well get it over with. ;D

Then you will have two mills but only need one saw, the current mill for big logs and portability and the new mill for smaller and medium logs at home.

Kind of like this

Milling 6x6 cedar posts - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=73&v=3SLO0pz2qpE&feature=emb_logo)

or this

Jonsered 600+ Chainsaw mill cutting planks - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avfOnzPidDw)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 07:53:38 AM
I do need to come up with some sort of clamp/jig or something, the small pieces don't like to stay still once the chain hits them.

If you are using your short ladder as a work bench, you could use some pipe straps (that look like the ohm symbol) around the ladder rungs and screw into your log.  If you are using some 2x4 or 2x6 boards on your saw horses, just screw up through them into your log.  Probably only need screws long enough to bite in an inch.  Just don't cut down too far!
Brilliant! I'm thinking your idea will work great. I already lose a bit due to the depth of the ladder sides vs the rungs and I don't expect to hug the sides with the chainsaw chain so an inch screw should work just great. Thanks for the idea! 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 08:00:29 AM
Make another mill for your saw, use tracks (can be made of wood) and a frame to hold the saw at the desired height.

You know it's going to happen eventually, might as well get it over with. ;D

Then you will have two mills but only need one saw, the current mill for big logs and portability and the new mill for smaller and medium logs at home.

Kind of like this

Milling 6x6 cedar posts - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=73&v=3SLO0pz2qpE&feature=emb_logo)

or this

Jonsered 600+ Chainsaw mill cutting planks - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avfOnzPidDw)
I think I know what you're talking about and I think you're right. A sort of bandsaw type set up but with the chainsaw as the cutter, in my mind at least, would have some advantages such as not having to set up a jig for the first cut each time, or supporting the weight of the whole contraption myself. The CSM gets a bit weighty after a while  :)  Something to plan for over the winter as the snow is flying and I'm cozy warm by the computer  ;D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 09:56:34 AM
The more I think about Hilltops suggestion the more I like the idea. I'm toying with a cube sort of thing with wheels on the bottom that would track along the side of the ladder or some sort of rail system I could fabricate. Going to let it keep percolating in the ol' brain box and see what I ultimately come up with.  When I design something I tend to start out simple, over complicate the life out of it then get frustrated and simplify it again... it's my process are you surprised  :D :D

My unfinished bathroom now wood drying room is starting to get kinda full  8)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0298.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573743097)

I sort of wish I could cut a standard length, in my mind it'd make stickering and stacking a bit easier.

On the subject of stickering, I know you need to space between boards to allow for air flow. I'm using 3/4" thick stickers, is there such a thing a too narrow or wide a sticker? So would a 1" wide sticker be better than say a 1/2" or a 2"?  I've read of some people asking about using pvc pipe as stickers and it was pointed out that the narrow contact area could/would cause divots due to the compression on said narrow area. On the other side, if the sticker is too wide it'll inhibit drying in that area. So I'm guessing a 1"x1" sticker is more or less considered optimal?  No, not trying to overthink it, just wondering on the variables.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 14, 2019, 12:22:11 PM
I see Norwood makes a " ladder frame" mill. You adjust the saw height for depth of cut.
https://www.norwoodsawmills.com/en_us/portamill-pm14 (https://www.norwoodsawmills.com/en_us/portamill-pm14)

Then there is the Logosol, where you adjust the log height.

https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/ (https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/)

This is a 16hp one I made 20 years ago (vertical V twin lawn tractor engine), I don't think I would use a mono rail if I made another, two tracks would be so much easier to build. I sold it years ago but every once in a while I see it come up for sale on Kijiji as it makes its way around the province. Looks like the last person added a electric winch for lift and a power feed.

Sawmill homemade / home built chainsaw mill - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pmkm1WGTYmI)

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 14, 2019, 12:59:43 PM
On the subject of stickering,

Mentioned elsewhere, get some store-bought 1x2 kiln dried.  Cheaper than you can make them and way faster ;)  If you really want to make some, don't make them square as they really won't be...  I've got a lot of 3/4x1.  Then you know which way you are setting them and there won't be variation in thickness.  I also had found a ton (500+) of 2x2's in a 42" length (free).  I routed (used a shaper) a notch down two sides to make them look like an H.  That was to allow better air flow through the 2" (1-3/4) contact area.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 03:31:11 PM
Mentioned elsewhere, get some store-bought 1x2 kiln dried.  Cheaper than you can make them and way faster


Too True!  

If you really want to make some, don't make them square as they really won't be...  I've got a lot of 3/4x1.  Then you know which way you are setting them and there won't be variation in thickness.


That's a good point. I'll use this idea going forward.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 03:40:07 PM
I see Norwood makes a " ladder frame" mill. You adjust the saw height for depth of cut.
https://www.norwoodsawmills.com/en_us/portamill-pm14 (https://www.norwoodsawmills.com/en_us/portamill-pm14)

Then there is the Logosol, where you adjust the log height.

https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/ (https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/)

This is a 16hp one I made 20 years ago (vertical V twin lawn tractor engine), I don't think I would use a mono rail if I made another, two tracks would be so much easier to build. I sold it years ago but every once in a while I see it come up for sale on Kijiji as it makes its way around the province. Looks like the last person added a electric winch for lift and a power feed.

Sawmill homemade / home built chainsaw mill - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pmkm1WGTYmI)
Goes to show there's multiple ways to do things :D  I assume the interior home shots on your video are of your house or one you did? Love the timber work and paneling, just amazing looking!
I've been kinda trying to avoid making anything of the sizes you've shown but I think I may want to reconsider. If I'm seriously going to be milling I think a raised bed of some sort would be ideal whether I use the CSM jig I have now or build a spiffy carriage to hold the chainsaw. I don't enjoy kneeling or bending over for any real length of time.
Got some serious thinking and planning to do over the winter.
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 14, 2019, 03:43:10 PM
I figure I need a supply of logs of some sort if I am going to justify building much of anything so in an effort to help drum up some I posted an ad on our version of CL stating I'm interested in logs but I'm not a tree service so can't touch them unless they're already on the ground (the ad is a bit more detailed ;).)

I don't expect anything amazing to come of it but it's free so it doesn't hurt to try :)  I figure the more people know the better the chances something will come my way.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 15, 2019, 09:13:11 AM
My moisture meter arrived yesterday, a week or more before it was estimated to be here!  8) 8)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0299.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1573826741)

Tested some of the wood I've been cutting with it and found the results interesting. The fresh stuff I cut two days ago was in the 50% range while the stuff I cut a few weeks ago was in the 25% range. I tested a small sticker I'd cut a week or more ago and it tested below 4% and a piece of maple and a 2x4 both didn't register depending on where I tested. I suspect the low numbers are due to not being able or willing to push the needles in far enough as I don't want to break the thing  :(  I'm thinking a 1/16" hole drilled right before I test might yield more accurate results. I think I also read that a sacrificial board is sometimes needed so you can cut it up to test. I haven't gone that far yet as I'm just playing around with it for now but it's something I'll need to keep in mind in the future. I'll have to do some searches on the forum and the interwebs to see if I can find more tips and tricks for using the meter.

All in all I think it's a good purchase. It has 4 density modes for different lumber species but only lists a couple dozen. The instructions suggest using mode 3 if the species isn't listed. I'm thinking I'll try and look up different species and see if I can't come up with my own list based on densities or other criteria I find as I search. I'm sure mode 3 will be just fine to get me in the ball park though which is all I need at the moment.


Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 15, 2019, 10:50:56 AM
 Congratulations  on the meter.  8)  My second hand lignomat meter arrived, two days ago as well via ebay.  It works and has the temp and species  charts with it, I'm going to try  a couple stainless steel nails centered  in a couple test pieces  as the pins are pretty short and probably only accurate for a short 3/4" thickness. I've got some slabs  and a little basswood I want to watch.  It will be interesting. Just haven't had a chance to mess with it much yet.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 15, 2019, 11:07:26 AM
There are specific gravity charts readily available for the different species.  Specific gravity for the most part correlates with conductivity and will give you the info you need for correction.  

Keep in mind also that moisture content above 30% cannot be accurately determined with a moisture meter.   Generally that's ok, because that's not the range you're interested in.  The oven dry method is the only way to reliably determine higher mc's.  There are lots of threads on here discussing these things so a little searching will pay off.

There are several good publications from the government agencies about drying and storing hardwood and softwood lumber.  They are very comprehensive and enlightening.  They are available as PDF's and easily found and downloaded.

Keep up the good work.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: captain_crunch on November 16, 2019, 03:04:10 AM
I can promise you that milling on ground is tough duty saw blows sawdust up in your face a set of car ramps would let you get a little bit off the ground 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 16, 2019, 07:44:02 AM
I can promise you that milling on ground is tough duty saw blows sawdust up in your face a set of car ramps would let you get a little bit off the ground
Hadn't thought about the dust in the face aspect of milling on the ground but now that you point it out it makes total sense. I hadn't thought of car ramps, might be the most economical way of doing it. They already have the tire divot so the log will more or less stay where you want it without rolling away AND I can use them for my car  ;D  I'm seriously digging the idea!
I've thought it's a shame I can't attach some sort of sawdust collector to the saw, especially on the fruit wood. I wonder if the sawdust would work well in a smoker  ???
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 16, 2019, 07:45:24 AM
There are specific gravity charts readily available for the different species.  Specific gravity for the most part correlates with conductivity and will give you the info you need for correction.  

Keep in mind also that moisture content above 30% cannot be accurately determined with a moisture meter.   Generally that's ok, because that's not the range you're interested in.  The oven dry method is the only way to reliably determine higher mc's.  There are lots of threads on here discussing these things so a little searching will pay off.

There are several good publications from the government agencies about drying and storing hardwood and softwood lumber.  They are very comprehensive and enlightening.  They are available as PDF's and easily found and downloaded.

Keep up the good work.
Thanks for pointing this out! I used my amazing searchfu skills and found a couple publications by the gvmt on the subject of specific gravity and also on wood drying and storage and printed them out so I can read and hopefully absorb them  :P
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 16, 2019, 07:47:13 AM
Congratulations  on the meter.  8)  My second hand lignomat meter arrived, two days ago as well via ebay.  It works and has the temp and species  charts with it, I'm going to try  a couple stainless steel nails centered  in a couple test pieces  as the pins are pretty short and probably only accurate for a short 3/4" thickness. I've got some slabs  and a little basswood I want to watch.  It will be interesting. Just haven't had a chance to mess with it much yet.
Nice score! 
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 16, 2019, 07:48:46 AM
depends on how much bar oil is in the saw dust, unless you can find bacon flavored bar oil! :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: jeepcj779 on November 16, 2019, 01:07:36 PM
Or you could use renderings from bacon as bar oil.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 16, 2019, 11:04:00 PM
Never thought about the chainsaw dust in a smoker box, use canola oil for bar oil and rip a piece to give you some long noodles to pack in that box. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 09:37:03 AM
depends on how much bar oil is in the saw dust, unless you can find bacon flavored bar oil! :D
Or you could use renderings from bacon as bar oil.


OOOOH if I'm cutting maple logs it'd smell like maple bacon!!!!!  8) 8)


Never thought about the chainsaw dust in a smoker box, use canola oil for bar oil and rip a piece to give you some long noodles to pack in that box.
I've looked at the noodles and thought the same thing! I'll have to give it a try.

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 10:05:32 AM
I keep an eye on the local version of CL, probably to the point of obsessively  ::) but it pays off so I suppose it's less obsession and more just practicality. Most of the time it's a bit frustrating because I see trees that the owners have already cut down to firewood size which makes sense given the market they are aiming for but dang it some of that would have been great if they'd have left it long. 

But every few weeks there's a gem, like this guy

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0301.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574001664)

I'd texted the owner a couple times and he didn't respond (his ad said to text him so *shrug* whatever) and I almost didn't call because I don't want to make a nuisance of myself but I figure if the ad is still up then it's fair game for a call or two. First call he answered and I chatted with him and explained what my plans were and he was cool with it all. 

My best mate agreed to come help and I'm glad he did. It was all the three of us could do to load the logs in. They are around 24" diameter or more and I cut them 4' long so I'm guessing the weights at about 500lbs each  :o :o  After a bit of work we got them loaded 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0302.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574001904)
 
I REALLY wanted a couple of the larger branches as they were big enough to make nice boards but I'm guessing we had 1500 lbs in just logs in the back of my little S-10. I haven't found an answer I trust as to what the actual bed weight capacity is but I've done this a few times so *shrug*  With the logs slightly forward of the rear axle the front wheels should also have taken some of the weight. It was an hours drive there and an hour back and on the way back I drove as slow as the speed limits would allow to minimize heat build up in the tires as much as I could (not sure how much it matters but I'll take every little bit I can get) and reduce impact stress from bumps. I REALLY need to build me a good log trailer... come on money tree start shedding your leaves!!!

We arrived home without trouble and unloaded the logs with the help of my sometimes nemesis gravity  ;)  There's some lovely airating divits on the lawn now ;D

I've printed out a couple designs for Adirondack chairs and plan to spend a few minutes assembling a cut list so I know what thicknesses and board feet I need in the hopes of maximizing what I can do. I'm hoping I'll have enough lumber for at least 2 chairs.

The fellow I got the tree from said it was a locust tree (locus is what he put in the listing so I'm assuming.) The current weather forcast calls for rain on Wednesday, my day off so I was a bit bummed until I remembered I have a pop up awning  8) 8)  So long as it's not a driving rain I can't see why I won't be able to mill. Cleaning up the man glitter may be a drag but you gots to do what you gots to do :D  I'm going to use some paint to seal these logs as I'm finding the parafin wax is a bit tempermental to work with and i'm not sure it's penetrating very well as it's peeling off on some of the other lumber I've already cut AND I have a fair bit of paint lying around. I can also write on the paint so may note MC, exact dimensions and a few other things on a couple of them just to see how the boards evolve over time (OG, you've infected me with your curiosity  :P )

That's all for now, hope everyone has a great weekend!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 17, 2019, 11:19:17 AM
Nice score!  Hey, you could have strapped a log to the front bumper, too! :D  I used to have a little Nissan pickup and between it and a U-Haul trailer, I'd bring home 1 ton of hay for our horses. 

I don't think you will have to worry about the locust checking.  Should be great material for your chairs.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 17, 2019, 11:23:56 AM
locust is very dense so make sure you have a sharp chain, and a ripping chain would make it go faster.  locust, esp. black locust is rot resistant.  nice work.  my dad used to abuse his 1970 GMC way beyond its stated capacity.  I do not think modern trucks still have the margin they used to.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 17, 2019, 11:30:42 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/96BE2F7A-CBAB-4D55-A14A-AF3FBCB76370.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1571875326)
 

locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/26D4E4BF-B1B4-4EC5-88F4-9FBE9BEE97D3.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1547313892)
 

honey locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/73FA8D70-5301-4614-9945-59552C306AAD.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1547313901)
 

honey locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/2BB1E1B0-197A-46B1-AB71-0A2EF795CE78.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1550110413)
 

HL, very strong, heavy, and pretty!  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 17, 2019, 11:51:26 AM
Honey locust is really dense,  it's almost pink some times when first cut pretty colors inside. Doc is right you will need sharp chain, and bugs really like it once cut (powder post beetles). Still a nice score it will make some nice projects.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 03:48:47 PM
locust is very dense so make sure you have a sharp chain, and a ripping chain would make it go faster.  locust, esp. black locust is rot resistant.  nice work.  my dad used to abuse his 1970 GMC way beyond its stated capacity.  I do not think modern trucks still have the margin they used to.  
Sweet thing about the rot resistance on the locust! 
I wish I had the coin to buy a ripping chain but at the moment I'll have to live with the cross cut chains I have. I've read that you can slowly turn it into a ripping chain when you sharpen by changing the sharpening angle so I may try that. 
Wife is on board with me buying a trailer when we can scrape some funds together. Her statement was along the lines of "we need your truck to last so we better get you a little trailer as soon as we can" oky doky dear, I won't argue  8)  
I can't remember if I've already stated this so sorry if I'm repeating myself. I'm thinking I'll buy one of those trailers where someone turn a pickup bed into a trailer. If I get one from a 1 Ton I should be able to turn it into a nice little log/utility trailer. I figure it'd be narrow enough I can pull it into my backyard without too many problems. I know the capacity would be limited compared to the log trailers I've seen on the forum but since my little pickup is only rated to pull 4000 lbs anyhow, no sense in getting a 5 ton trailer. I'll pull the sheet metal bed off, weld up some good pipe sides, put a good floor on it and some things that I can put a removable 2x4 plywood sides on for when I need to haul away tree branches or leave but remove for parbuckling logs over the side. Also want to put a nice winch on and an attachment for a log arch on the back. Nice to have options on how I get logs in :)  No solid plans or specs yet, mostly just kicking ideas around in my head.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 03:52:03 PM
Nice score!  Hey, you could have strapped a log to the front bumper, too! :D  I used to have a little Nissan pickup and between it and a U-Haul trailer, I'd bring home 1 ton of hay for our horses.  

I don't think you will have to worry about the locust checking.  Should be great material for your chairs.
HAHAHA I've got a deer strapped to the hood sort of arrangement flashing through my mind!  Seriously good thing you couldn't suggest this last night or I'd have seriously considered it! I REALLY hated leaving those 2 logs behind.
These little pickups are tougher than people think :) or they're not but no one told me or my pickup so we don't know it's supposed to break  ;)  Gotta do what you gotta do sometimes and just do what you can to reduce the risks. Not saying what I did or have done is smart, just saying I've done it.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 03:56:08 PM

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/96BE2F7A-CBAB-4D55-A14A-AF3FBCB76370.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1571875326)
 

locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/26D4E4BF-B1B4-4EC5-88F4-9FBE9BEE97D3.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1547313892)
 

honey locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/73FA8D70-5301-4614-9945-59552C306AAD.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1547313901)
 

honey locust


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/2BB1E1B0-197A-46B1-AB71-0A2EF795CE78.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1550110413)
 

HL, very strong, heavy, and pretty!  
Hey Doc, what's the first picture of? Almost looks like boat trailer rollers or something? I'm guessing you posted it as the wood is locust and it supports a LOT of weight :)   I've seen a few of the things you've made out of the honey locust which is why I was pretty persistent about getting this wood home :) 
I think part of why this is such a draw for me is when I was a kid we had a woodworking shop in our garage and I always wanted to make fine furniture but didn't have the money for the fine wood. Now that I'm older I am honest enough to admit it would likely have just ended up as fine sawdust BUT the little kid inside me still wants the nice stuff :) This is how I go about trying to fulfill that desire AND I get the satisfaction of doing it myself.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 03:57:23 PM
Honey locust is really dense,  it's almost pink some times when first cut pretty colors inside. Doc is right you will need sharp chain, and bugs really like it once cut (powder post beetles). Still a nice score it will make some nice projects.
I guess  I really need to look into what pests are in my area. 
I'm looking forward to posting about whatever I build on the forum :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 17, 2019, 05:46:43 PM
It's already starting crack (this is checking right?)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0303.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574030465)

Painted all the ends that are standing up to hopefully try and stop the checking (I am using that correct?)

It's exterior grade latex paint we had from painting the kids play house so cost me nothing. Once this runs out I'll have to figure out if I want to do Anchorseal or what but for now this should last me a while :)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0305.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574030512)

My little man glitter loving helper monkey :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 17, 2019, 06:18:26 PM
bucking up firewood (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108109.msg1687265#msg1687265)
  on: October 23, 2019, 08:11:04 PM 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 17, 2019, 06:20:38 PM
2 band blades and 5 chains need sharpened (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=107679.msg1679249#msg1679249)
on: September 08, 2019, 07:02:44 PM

see we all have our challenges!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 17, 2019, 08:12:46 PM
Does your Honey Locust out that way not come with the man killer spikes that will put an 8pt buck to shame?

I will have to get some photos of the ones I have, not exaggerating when I say they are a ft long with multiple points. They would score quite high in Pope and Young. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: donbj on November 18, 2019, 01:50:14 AM
You have a rich blessing within your wife Brandon. You have mentioned her support throughout your thread here. All the best to you both!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 08:26:15 AM
2 band blades and 5 chains need sharpened (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=107679.msg1679249#msg1679249)
on: September 08, 2019, 07:02:44 PM

see we all have our challenges!
Well I learned something new! Never heard of filling rot with cement before (and now I hope I never hear of it again  :( )  I admire your tenacity and desire to figure out what the blue blazes was in that log  :P
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 08:29:27 AM
You have a rich blessing within your wife Brandon. You have mentioned her support throughout your thread here. All the best to you both!
Thanks donbj!! I really am very blessed and fortunate to have her in my life and my three step kids  :) :)  I can say in absolute honesty that because of them I have become a better person. I don't deserve any of them but I am grateful for them for sure!

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 18, 2019, 08:33:04 AM
As far as honey locust goes,  I have some around with horns and some without horns, so I guess it varies.  Some trees are just hornier than others.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 10:00:02 AM
Does your Honey Locust out that way not come with the man killer spikes that will put an 8pt buck to shame?

I will have to get some photos of the ones I have, not exaggerating when I say they are a ft long with multiple points. They would score quite high in Pope and Young.
I've seen it with the thorns but this one I picked up doesn't have any.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 12:34:57 PM
Was going to start sawing the logs but ran into some problems and have a couple questions.

How do you remove particularly stuck in nails? I was able to remove two of them but the third is almost all the way in and won't budge :( The nails are almost 3" long so I really hate to leave it in and cut around it if I can avoid doing so.

I'm planning to cut 1/2" over width and thickness dimensions needed to allow for any shrinking during drying and to be able to plane out any grooves and hopefully any slight warping or other such defects. I read a couple threads where this was over what they were saying but they were also using bandsaw mills which I assume give a nicer cut. 

Should I leave the boards as wide as they come off the log or is it ok to rip them down to roughly the correct width? I'm thinking the smaller they are the faster they will dry?

Also found out my mill is currently about 1/2 too narrow to use the ladder as a guide, so need to figure out how I'll sort that. 

Seemed to run into more bumps than progress today but it's all part of the learning process  :P  Did get a bunch of stickers cut so when I do get to milling I am set. The weather is supposed to start turning wet and cold in the next day or two so I'm feeling a bit of pressure to try and get as much milled as I can. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 18, 2019, 02:04:33 PM
Should I leave the boards as wide as they come off the log or is it ok to rip them down to roughly the correct width? I'm thinking the smaller they are the faster they will dry?


Thickness is what will determine how long it takes your lumber to dry, the thicker it is the longer it takes as water evaporates from the outer surface first and then moves from the center of the lumber out to the face.  There are other factors such as species, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, number of chickens sacrificed, etc but just trying to answer the question you had posed.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 18, 2019, 02:36:10 PM
There is always a chicken in there somewhere. ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 03:34:04 PM
Should I leave the boards as wide as they come off the log or is it ok to rip them down to roughly the correct width? I'm thinking the smaller they are the faster they will dry?


Thickness is what will determine how long it takes your lumber to dry, the thicker it is the longer it takes as water evaporates from the outer surface first and then moves from the center of the lumber out to the face.  There are other factors such as species, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, number of chickens sacrificed, etc but just trying to answer the question you had posed.  
Is there a standard number of chickens per board foot I need to know about?  :o :o
I think 1/2" over the two dimensions will hopefully be enough. As I gain more experience and confidence perhaps I can shrink that down but for my first go around I think it's better to err on the side of caution and waste a bit of wood to saw dust than to try and cut it closer and end up with a lot of designer firewood  :(
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 03:41:04 PM
Tried to drill a hole in the center of the nose sprocket area... and must have work hardened the darn thing  >:(  Oh well, have all of work to figure out do I use the mill as is or do I try and gain an extra couple inches of cut length by using a small grinding bit to finish the hole in the nose sprocket.

I think I'll likely deal with the current length due to the weather getting ready to turn bad. Forcast calls for 4 snow days over the next 10 days or so. 

Hopefully I'll be able to get one log milled at least. I'll have to tip the other two over and paint the ends. I've read that if you store logs off the ground they don't rot as quickly so I'll probably put a few chunks of 4x4 under them and hope for the best.

I think milling season may be drawing to a close for me this year. Now I can save up for all the widgets and doo dads I want to try out when it warms up in 2020 :D and I guess it's time to get back to working on finishing the basement. 

If the weather turns good and any snow melts I can always go out and mill again :) The thing about Utah's weather, it's unpredictable, if you don't like it wait a few minutes and it usually changes :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 18, 2019, 04:09:45 PM
Should I leave the boards as wide as they come off the log or is it ok to rip them down to roughly the correct width? I'm thinking the smaller they are the faster they will dry?


Thickness is what will determine how long it takes your lumber to dry, the thicker it is the longer it takes as water evaporates from the outer surface first and then moves from the center of the lumber out to the face.  There are other factors such as species, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, number of chickens sacrificed, etc but just trying to answer the question you had posed.  
Is there a standard number of chickens per board foot I need to know about?  :o :o
I think 1/2" over the two dimensions will hopefully be enough. As I gain more experience and confidence perhaps I can shrink that down but for my first go around I think it's better to err on the side of caution and waste a bit of wood to saw dust than to try and cut it closer and end up with a lot of designer firewood  :(
Brandon
For flat 1" lumber I generally saw 3/8" over target thickness, as far as width goes generally it's an inch over if 8" and under and something more than that for over 8". This allows for both shrink and movement while still getting my target size almost 100% of the time. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: beav on November 18, 2019, 04:42:37 PM
The weather here is sometimes completely the opposite: if you like it wait a few minutes and it will change
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 18, 2019, 05:24:22 PM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620) 
How do you remove particularly stuck in nails? I was able to remove two of them but the third is almost all the way in and won't budge :( The nails are almost 3" long so I really hate to leave it in and cut around it if I can avoid doing so.

What I have done is usually I take my little gerber  pocket knife and whittle a little divit around the nail sort of like a counter sunk woodscrew head, then I grab vice grips and try and get a good enough bite to pull it out. If that fails depending on the heft of the nail I take a drill bit and drill on all four sides of it removing wood around the head till I get a good enough bite to pull it.  I have used a torx bit and a screw to loosen the wood around a nail as well.  Yes it will booger up the piece  but you can probably fix that well enough. Still wrestling with the quote thing.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on November 18, 2019, 07:51:47 PM
Sometimes pounding the nail in,just a little,will help with the removal.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 07:59:52 PM
Should I leave the boards as wide as they come off the log or is it ok to rip them down to roughly the correct width? I'm thinking the smaller they are the faster they will dry?


Thickness is what will determine how long it takes your lumber to dry, the thicker it is the longer it takes as water evaporates from the outer surface first and then moves from the center of the lumber out to the face.  There are other factors such as species, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, number of chickens sacrificed, etc but just trying to answer the question you had posed.  
Is there a standard number of chickens per board foot I need to know about?  :o :o
I think 1/2" over the two dimensions will hopefully be enough. As I gain more experience and confidence perhaps I can shrink that down but for my first go around I think it's better to err on the side of caution and waste a bit of wood to saw dust than to try and cut it closer and end up with a lot of designer firewood  :(
Brandon
For flat 1" lumber I generally saw 3/8" over target thickness, as far as width goes generally it's an inch over if 8" and under and something more than that for over 8". This allows for both shrink and movement while still getting my target size almost 100% of the time.
Thank you  :)  Gives me a decent idea of what I need to do. I think the biggest is 6" wide so I'll rip it at 7" just to be on the safe side.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 08:01:30 PM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620)
How do you remove particularly stuck in nails? I was able to remove two of them but the third is almost all the way in and won't budge :( The nails are almost 3" long so I really hate to leave it in and cut around it if I can avoid doing so.

What I have done is usually I take my little gerber  pocket knife and whittle a little divit around the nail sort of like a counter sunk woodscrew head, then I grab vice grips and try and get a good enough bite to pull it out. If that fails depending on the heft of the nail I take a drill bit and drill on all four sides of it removing wood around the head till I get a good enough bite to pull it.  I have used a torx bit and a screw to loosen the wood around a nail as well.  Yes it will booger up the piece  but you can probably fix that well enough. Still wrestling with the quote thing.
Sometimes pounding the nail in,just a little,will help with the removal.


Thank you both for the ideas!  Gives me something to try. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 08:27:58 PM
Ok, I'm over my self pity party and I'm ready to fight the weather for the joy of milling  8)

Going to buy a Cobalt drill bit to try and finish the hole in the bar tip. It'll give me about 2" more of width which is helpful. I seem to remember drilling a hardened firearm bolt using a cobalt bit and a lot of cooling fluid (seriously miss that little mill set up sometimes.) It only has to drill through less than 1/8" of the bar, probably less as I was able to get it through a ways before it went to pot. I was a bit cocky and didn't use enough cutting fluid and used the same metal backer I used for the last couple holes which still had the hole so I can only figure it air/work hardened. Fingers crossed the cobalt bit will do the trick.

When the weather decides to win the arm wrestling match I need to weld up a cant hook. I have some 3/4" schedule 40 iron pipe I plan to use as the handle and an assortment of 1/8" to 1/2" metal I can cut and use for the hook and connections. It'll be a bit on the weighty side but it has one important feature... I already have all the supplies so the price is right  ;D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 18, 2019, 08:35:18 PM
I wouldnt recommend making your own cant hook. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: zimraphail on November 18, 2019, 08:38:37 PM
I make knives. Most often out of o1 tool steel! I do heat and slow cool prior to drilling handle pins! Other wise, no way will stip cobalt as well! Sometimes I have to resharpen cobalt a few times to get it done but so far ok with allot of cooling fluid! Heat when drilling tool stell makes it even harder!   Afgter pins and rough grinding then I oil harden and Aneil
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 18, 2019, 08:46:17 PM
I have some 3/4" schedule 40 iron pipe I plan to use as the handle

I have a Logrite 60" cant hook.  It has at least a 1", if not 1" handle.  Very comfortable and reasonably light.  I've put my full 200+ pounds jumping on it to rotate a log.  I've bent plenty of " water pipe doing much less work than my Logrite does.  If you insist on doing it with materials on hand, I'd go with a bigger pipe for the handle.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 18, 2019, 09:15:36 PM
I wouldnt recommend making your own cant hook.
Why's that?
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 18, 2019, 10:04:13 PM
You simply can't over state the value of a genuine Log Rite Peavey or Canthook. I used to have the old wooden handle ones and broke every one eventually. 

Of all the things you can make for yourself, that should not be on the list. It is a tool you will have for many years. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on November 18, 2019, 10:32:08 PM
i agree that there are some things to be fabricated at home and there's things that should be purchased from a manufacturer who has figured out the materials and geometry.  A cant hook is one item to be purchased rather than made.  The value of well made and functional cant hooks (or peavys if you prefer) can't be overstated.  The last thing you want is to be trying to get a job done and break/bend your homemade or economy cant hook.  

I know what you are doing is a hobby but the "buy once cry once" mantra applies to cant hooks.  I'm sure if you could put your hands on a Logrite you would know exactly what we mean.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 18, 2019, 10:43:11 PM
What they said. 

Its hard to achieve functionality OR safety in the design and fab, much less both. A failure in a cant hook can lead to broken legs or worse. There are a lot of forces at play when moving logs. 

Sch 40 3/4 is pretty much like a pool noodle for that application. 

Both the stihl and woodmizer cant hooks are Logrite. Probably some other brands too. You might be able to look at one at a local stihl dealer. A real dealer, not the box store. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: hacknchop on November 18, 2019, 11:13:25 PM
 While I agree that the Logrite canthook is a good product ,I disagree with the running down of every other canthook or peavey , I know they are a Forum sponsor and I thank them for that and if I am ever buying a canthook they can count on my business but I have got by my whole life with wooden handled hooks and never broke one using it as a log rolling tool.
  Maybe your not able to make your own but that dose not mean someone else cannot make a good canthook , live and learn and if your not successfull then yes buy one made by Logrite tried and proven , I have made two with steel handles one with a 48" and the other a 60" I have never broke either one and yes they are heavy and clumsy but then again so am I.:) 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JoshNZ on November 19, 2019, 05:09:39 AM
I can't even find one for sale here in NZ so will prob have to make one. Let us know how you go if you do!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 09:38:20 AM
Wow, didn't expect the home made cant hook to spark such a response  :)

I would LOVE to buy a Logrite cant hook, I've looked at them and they do look worth every penny and I would very much like to support a forum sponsor as without them this forum wouldn't be what it is. The problem is I don't have the funds for such a piece of equipment, sorry I don't wish to come off as poor or garner sympathy nor do I wish to keep trumpeting the sad situation that is my wallet but it's the reality I am in at the moment. I only point it out so you understand some of why I do what I do. Perhaps in a few months or a year I will have the money to buy the good equipment. I do subscribe to the "Buy Once Cry Once" philosophy on many many things, I bought the Husky chainsaw even though it was a painful hit to the pocket book. I really don't have the money for a quality cant hook right now so my options as I see it are to do nothing till I have said money (it's not really an option as I don't sit still or wait patiently well), continue on with nothing but my back and hands and perhaps a 2x4 and strap to roll logs, or I attempt to build one which I have no illusions will not be up to the quality of one designed by people who know what they are doing and I have no doubt have spent a LOT of money in R&D but which will at least get me by for the time being and is hopefully better than nothing. 

I realize the above paragraph could be misread as me ranting or getting snarky, I apologize for any of this and assure all of those who posted " just buy the Logrite" I 110% appreciate and thank you for taking the time to post your thoughts and experiences. If I am frustrated or annoyed, it is not with you fine members but with the circumstances I am in that do not allow me to buy what I want or even need. 

I appreciate everyone pointing out that the Sch 40 pipe won't work, I'll scrap that idea. I'll have to find stronger tube/pipe. 

On another topic, I bought the cobalt drill bit and tried to finish drilling the hole in the sprocket... zimraphail was spot on. I did read about a nifty trick to spot aneal where you take a metal rod the same diameter, heat it red hot then stick it on the spot and let it all cool down as slowly as possible. I'm tempted to try that but I wonder if it'd damage the bearings in the sprocket. At the moment I'm debating using a dremel with a grinder bit of some sort (I have a lot of them, just need to see if one of them will work for this application) or just carrying on with the mill only being about 16" wide. Do I spend the time on trying to get 2" more or do I spend the time on milling... hmmm decisions decisions. 

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 09:40:18 AM
I can't even find one for sale here in NZ so will prob have to make one. Let us know how you go if you do!
Josh, given your fabricating abilities I have no doubt if you make one it'll be top notch!
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 19, 2019, 10:07:57 AM
I don't see your reply as snarky or anything like that.  After I broke my last wooden handle one, which of course happened as I lay into it standing on a pile of logs and tumbled to the bottom with a now sharp stick flying at my face, I was looking for a replacement handle and looked at the Log Rite since so many folks raved about them. Had the same response you did - can't afford it, but my wife said since so many guys talk about how good they are and how much just a replacement handle would cost for my old one - knowing it will break again - she convinced me to buy one.  I married a smart woman.  

The response you got is probably because each and every one of us have been where you are and understand what you are doing, nothing more than passing along experience is all it is.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 19, 2019, 10:12:57 AM
I wasn't trying to disparage or discourage.  Just trying to say there's more to it than meets the eye and the consequences of failure can be significant.  

You may want to make a small bench and sell it to finance the cant hook.  Then you're working on your ultimate goal and it may be a better use of your time.  I like to fab stuff too, and I've done many things that weren't always the best payoff on my time.  I guess the older I get, the more I try to make better choices.  I can make more money, but I can't make more time.

Have fun, and stay safe.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 11:09:54 AM
The response you got is probably because each and every one of us have been where you are and understand what you are doing, nothing more than passing along experience is all it is.


That's how I'm taking it and really do appreciate everyone taking the time to pass along their wisdom and experience. 

You may want to make a small bench and sell it to finance the cant hook.


Can I make a bench with green wood? I would be concerned it would check and twist as it dried :(

I understand what everyone is saying, need to be smart and stay safe. It would be pretty foolish to "save" $100 only to be injured by a log.

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 11:20:34 AM
I decided to grind out the sprocket hole. I guess I really want that extra length in milling :)

From the beginning - I started out using a Titanium coated HSS drill bit, I think this was a mistake :(

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0307.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574180021)

Was able to get about half way through on either side but then no further  >:(

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0308.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574180090)

I don't know if starting off with a Cobalt bit would have made a difference but I have one now so I'll have to try it in the future and see.

Got the dremel and some grinding bits out and went to town. Hooray there's light at the end of the tunnel!

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0309.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574180181)

Almost there! The tape is covering the grease hole to try and minimize the grit that gets in

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0310.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574180196)

After maybe an hours time we have success!!!

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0311.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574180238)

Now I'm off to HF to buy the cheapy metal detector. I don't want to spend the money but I either buy the detector and hopefully find the metal with that or at some point I'll find it with my chains which will add up quick  :( :o

Hopefully I can get some milling done today :)

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JoshNZ on November 19, 2019, 01:31:12 PM
I wonder if the sprocket was too hard in the middle or if you cooked it on your way in haha. Those stainless nuts I had to drill to roll pin for the top of my stabiliser leg/jack's all went good except for one. Even running flood coolant over the drill bit if you let up the pressure for even a moment and it starts rubbing, it's over! I find it incredible that something you were peeling chips out of like soft cheese a moment ago can turn the tips of even your hardest newest drills to mush once it's gone.

Interesting trick with the hot rod, might be handy to know.

I've been stuck doing projects on the cheap, get into it! Better making one then not having one
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 03:40:31 PM
I find it incredible that something you were peeling chips out of like soft cheese a moment ago can turn the tips of even your hardest newest drills to mush once it's gone.


I wonder if I let up for that moment and that's when it hardened ???  It is amazing how as you say you're going great then wham, it's like trying to drill through diamond.

Interesting trick with the hot rod, might be handy to know.


I haven't tried it, just read about it, so can't say if it works or not.

I've been stuck doing projects on the cheap, get into it! Better making one then not having one


That seems to sum my life up some days :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 03:58:17 PM
I think I flooded the carb so saw won't start. No big deal, been going hard for a couple hours and can use the break. Figure while I'm letting my back relax and the water rehydrate me I'd post pics

Using the ladder for the first cut. I'm really glad I took the time to get those extra couple inches, the ladder is nice to use as it makes entering and exiting the cut pretty easy

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0312.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196230)

I don't really want to drill a lot of holes in the ladder as I worry it'd ruin it's "straightness" so I'm trying to be sparing on the holes

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0313.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196321)

In case anyone was wondering what the ladder was for. Admittedly the saw is held level when in use

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0314.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196369)

First cut done! Went pretty smooth

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0315.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196414)

Or so I thought... there was a chunk of metal in there.. I went over it with the metal detector before I cut and didn't see anything but I'm willing to chalk it up to user error as I'm new to using one and still figuring it out.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0316.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196441)

Luckily it only grazed it and boogered the teeth on one side. So I got a jump on changing the angle to that of a ripping chain  ;)  Gotta love when life forces those choices for you

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0320.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196536)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0321.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196169)

I'm prepared for milling... or the zombie apocalypse... or both. I haven't been wearing a mask but am tired of coughing dust for a few days after. It just can't be good for my lungs

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0322.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196621)

The wood is really pretty

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0324.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196744)

Is the crack running up the center of the log Shake or is this normal? I figure I'll cut it out when I rip the boards to rough width before I sticker and stack them.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0325.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196768)

The sawdust from this one log has pretty well filled one of my trash cans. If I mill tomorrow I'll have to bag it and maybe make a run to the landfill Saturday after work.

So far I have 5 5/4 boards. Need one more then it's on to cutting the 8/4 ones. So long as the crack down the middle of the boards doesn't cause too many problems I think this one log should yield what I need to two chairs next summer  8) 8)

Brandon 

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: YellowHammer on November 19, 2019, 04:04:59 PM
Looks good. 
The crack is pith check.  Its pretty much in all hardwood logs.  So when making live edge slabs, when sawing through it, the one large slab will end up being two narrower slabs when the wood is dried.

When I was using a ladder, I drilled a couple holes through the rungs, and put screws through the rungs into the bark.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 19, 2019, 04:08:51 PM
As usual, @YellowHammer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=11488)  "hit the nail on the head".


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0316.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574196441)

... sorry, too soon :D ?  this is why in slabs, guys will try to "center the pith"  inside the slab.  when setting up to saw, if there is a prominent crack across the pith, you can try to make it parallel to the ground so it only is contained in one slab and not all.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 04:56:12 PM
Looks good.
The crack is pith check.  Its pretty much in all hardwood logs.  So when making live edge slabs, when sawing through it, the one large slab will end up being two narrower slabs when the wood is dried.

When I was using a ladder, I drilled a couple holes through the rungs, and put screws through the rungs into the bark.  
Good to know about the pith crack :)
Seriously... drilling holes through the rungs is a great idea! Thanks! I over complicate things sometimes  ;D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 05:00:33 PM
... sorry, too soon ?


Nah, you get a lot of leeway with the 2 bands and 5 chains adventure you posted ;D  I got way lucky only grazing it.. was a brand new chain though so that's a bit of a bummer but hey I guess I'm well on my way to being a real sawyer now that I've found my first hidden "gem"!

 this is why in slabs, guys will try to "center the pith"  inside the slab.  when setting up to saw, if there is a prominent crack across the pith, you can try to make it parallel to the ground so it only is contained in one slab and not all.  


Ahhh ok that makes sense. I think I understood the reasoning in a vague nebulous sort of way but now that I've got the real world example and you point it out it clicks 8)  I will have to remember this and plan my future cuts accordingly. 

Thanks for the education Doc and Yellowhammer!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 05:13:03 PM
Here's the gem once it was extracted 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0318.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574200881)

Nebraska, your idea of drilling around the head, or in this case shaft, until I could get enough room to grab onto it was what worked! Thanks for posting the idea! When I'd initially asked the question I didn't know about this little guy, so your response was fortuitous. I kept drilling around it until it loosened enough it'd turn. 


So a few things I've learned today as I've milled. Be careful where you locate the center handle on your jig, mine's right in line with the exhaust from the muffler and it gets warm.

Milling is slow and tedious and I wouldn't want to do it for a living, but I enjoy it as a hobby and even though my back is a bit sore and I am covered in dust and smell of 2 stroke exhaust, there's a smile on my face and my heart is light... that could be the exhaust fumes speaking though  ;)

I really would like to build a bench or heavy duty saw horses or something that I can roll the log onto to get it a foot or two off the ground. The first few cuts aren't too bad but as you get near the ground it's really not comfortable and my leg muscles start to cramp. I'm going to have to come up with something that is VERY sturdy but can be taken down and moved when I don't use it since I mill on the back porch. 

Milling makes a LOT of man glitter, seriously it seems like I have enough to make a whole other log! Wish I could figure out something useful I could do with it instead of throwing it away. Good thing I have a truck I can start tossing bags of the stuff in to take to the landfill. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 19, 2019, 05:31:41 PM
Here's the gem once it was extracted




So a few things I've learned today as I've milled. Be careful where you locate the center handle on your jig, mine's right in line with the exhaust from the muffler and it gets warm.



 smell of 2 stroke exhaust, there's a smile on my face and my heart is light... that could be the exhaust fumes speaking though  ;)



 
Milling makes a LOT of man glitter, seriously it seems like I have enough to make a whole other log! Wish I could figure out something useful I could do with it instead of throwing it away. Good thing I have a truck I can start tossing bags of the stuff in to take to the landfill.

Brandon
 

You will now refer to this as the "winter" handle position. you can later develop the "summer" position

SOB indicates carbon monoxide, smiles indicated unburned fuel, maybe we can incorporate this into a  carb tuning video  :D


ask at work to see who are the chicken ranchers @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) and they will love it.  I also make fire starters as demonstrated last year @customsawyer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1861)

best regards. doc
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 19, 2019, 06:44:00 PM
Here's the gem once it was extracted




So a few things I've learned today as I've milled. Be careful where you locate the center handle on your jig, mine's right in line with the exhaust from the muffler and it gets warm.



 smell of 2 stroke exhaust, there's a smile on my face and my heart is light... that could be the exhaust fumes speaking though  ;)



 
Milling makes a LOT of man glitter, seriously it seems like I have enough to make a whole other log! Wish I could figure out something useful I could do with it instead of throwing it away. Good thing I have a truck I can start tossing bags of the stuff in to take to the landfill.

Brandon
 

You will now refer to this as the "winter" handle position. you can later develop the "summer" position

SOB indicates carbon monoxide, smiles indicated unburned fuel, maybe we can incorporate this into a  carb tuning video  :D


ask at work to see who are the chicken ranchers @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) and they will love it.  I also make fire starters as demonstrated last year @customsawyer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1861)

best regards. doc
I have a neighbor that has chickens! I'd happily give him some. I'll have to ask him.

Southside, is sawdust from ripping logs too fine? I'd hate to try and help out my neighbor only to kill his chickens  :'( :'(

I'll have to try and mix some of the sawdust with parfin wax and see :)

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 19, 2019, 08:07:06 PM
We use the sawdust from my mill as mulch under out raspberry bushes, we also throw some in the compost bin in proper proportions. Good for soaking up some oil on the shop floor or as a sweeping compound. i am always looking for new uses. No way am I taking it to the dump. I'll spread it in the woods first. My grandsons like to play in a pile of it and move it with their toy loaders and dump trucks.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 19, 2019, 08:41:46 PM
You neighbor will be happy man glitter is fine for chicken bedding, in fact good sharp chainsaw chain chips are about the same size as the compressed  fine wood chips in the plastic bags at the farm store.   
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 19, 2019, 08:46:48 PM
@ManjiSann (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620)  This  just got me thinking that might be your first happy customer 8), might pay you off in eggs.  8). Off shoot  business idea organic chicken coop bedding  8) 8).  Ok I better go get something productive done I'm having too much fun.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 19, 2019, 09:05:14 PM
Sawdust and chicken manure makes the best potting soil you can get.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 20, 2019, 08:00:24 AM
We use the sawdust from my mill as mulch under out raspberry bushes, we also throw some in the compost bin in proper proportions. Good for soaking up some oil on the shop floor or as a sweeping compound. i am always looking for new uses. No way am I taking it to the dump. I'll spread it in the woods first. My grandsons like to play in a pile of it and move it with their toy loaders and dump trucks.
My youngest likes to play in it too  :)
I'll have to keep some around to absorb the odd spill. I hadn't thought of using it as mulch, I'll try that. Another neighbor has raspberry's I'll see if he'd like some for his bushes :)
Sadly I don't have a forest I can spread it in :(
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: captain_crunch on November 20, 2019, 05:21:31 PM
This is something that I learned takes more thinking than sawing not to be a wood butcher and become a sawyer 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 20, 2019, 06:59:23 PM
This is something that I learned takes more thinking than sawing not to be a wood butcher and become a sawyer
Too true! 
I ripped the boards and lost probably 15" total in board width cutting the pith cracking out  :( Good lesson on thinking before cutting!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 20, 2019, 07:18:58 PM
It was a light drizzle today... why is the weatherman only right when I don't want them to be? I didn't feel like trying to sweep up wet sawdust so worked on ripping the boards from yesterday.

Decided to make stickers out of one of the flitches. I think it was Doc that commented something to the extent that one board in every log can become stickers  :P

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0327.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574294670)

Woohoo first board!!! oh wait, I cut the 5/4 when it was supposed to be the 8/4 board...  smiley_dunce

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0328.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574294854)

So I cut it to the correct size... I'm sure I can figure something out for the other piece. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0329.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574294973)

Mid way through my neighbor texted asking what kind of fruit wood I had for smoking... so I had him come help me rip the 8/4 stuff as it was heavy enough to tip the table saw. He was super helpful and I got to know him better, nice guy and I sent him home with a wheelbarrow full of assorted fruit wood for his son in law to try out.  

Here's the results of the days work

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0330.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574294997)

I'm super excited to use this wood when it dries. There's some really nice coloring in it. I'm going to try and be a bit more careful when sawing the remaining two logs to reduce loss. Might even try quarter sawing a bit of it to see if I can get some nice coloring out of it. Unfortunately the forecast shows snow all next week  :snowball: :snowball:  Hopefully it clears a bit after so I can mill more lumber :)

On another note... sawdust accumulates so much faster than I expect. Went to empty the shopvac figuring it was about half full and saw this

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0331.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574295415)

It's never a good thing when the filter is so packed in it pops off the motor  ::) ::)  I have to give Rigid props, it was still sucking up dust even though it was so full.

All in all a good day and I'm real happy with the stack of wood  8)

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 20, 2019, 08:11:58 PM
You make pretty stacks man. I wish I had the patience for that. But you work pretty hard for your lumber. I am going to have to work on that. In the spring I hope to make at least 2 more drying skids so I can stack by thickness. This fall I just have no time. I am hoping to take tomorrow afternoon off and get some work done, I hope I get lucky like you did today and move forward.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 20, 2019, 11:10:24 PM
In the 3 rd photo, the board on the left, you might want to find a way to identify that board now, and see what happens as it dries, it will give you good experience on how that wood behaves.  It looks like you have sap wood and heart wood there and they are in competition with each other.  With lumber I saw that board would crook as it dries as the heart wood and sap wood don't shrink in the same manner when drying.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 21, 2019, 07:09:49 AM
In the 3 rd photo, the board on the left, you might want to find a way to identify that board now, and see what happens as it dries, it will give you good experience on how that wood behaves.  It looks like you have sap wood and heart wood there and they are in competition with each other.  With lumber I saw that board would crook as it dries as the heart wood and sap wood don't shrink in the same manner when drying.  
That would make for an interesting, fun, and educational project. Just thumb tack a note to it with a tag and make note of changes on the tag time/vs flatness. I wonder if having it strapped will prevent some or any of the cupping? How often to you snug your straps?
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 21, 2019, 08:01:09 AM
In the 3 rd photo, the board on the left, you might want to find a way to identify that board now, and see what happens as it dries, it will give you good experience on how that wood behaves.  It looks like you have sap wood and heart wood there and they are in competition with each other.  With lumber I saw that board would crook as it dries as the heart wood and sap wood don't shrink in the same manner when drying.  
I'm assuming you're referring to the board on the outer edge closest to the photographer (away from the other stack of wood?)  I'll tack a note to it as OG says or write on the edge with a marker.

I did notice as I was cutting some of the boards they wanted to start crooking... I hope it doesn't get too severe as it dries. Is there anything that I can do in the drying process to reduce this?

When sawing is it standard practice to try and separate heartwood and sapwood? So many principles to learn doing this  :P

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 21, 2019, 08:08:14 AM
In the 3 rd photo, the board on the left, you might want to find a way to identify that board now, and see what happens as it dries, it will give you good experience on how that wood behaves.  It looks like you have sap wood and heart wood there and they are in competition with each other.  With lumber I saw that board would crook as it dries as the heart wood and sap wood don't shrink in the same manner when drying.  
That would make for an interesting, fun, and educational project. Just thumb tack a note to it with a tag and make note of changes on the tag time/vs flatness. I wonder if having it strapped will prevent some or any of the cupping? How often to you snug your straps?
I believe it will reduce cupping, warping, twisting some but I bet in the end if the competing forces are strong enough the boards will still be able to move. 

Lately I check all the straps every couple days as I'm down there a lot. Haven't had to really tighten any yet.

I'm thinking I should to put a fan on a timer to circulate the air a bit now that I have so much wood in that small space. Have it turn on 15 minutes every hour or so, just enough to ensure the air between the stacks gets circulated to move the moisture out.

Once winter is over I'm planning to build one of those basic solar kilns that Doc posted but for now I figure the arid nature of modern homes will work quite well.

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 21, 2019, 08:25:20 AM
You make pretty stacks man. I wish I had the patience for that. But you work pretty hard for your lumber. I am going to have to work on that. In the spring I hope to make at least 2 more drying skids so I can stack by thickness. This fall I just have no time. I am hoping to take tomorrow afternoon off and get some work done, I hope I get lucky like you did today and move forward.
I won't lie, they do look nice and give me a bit of contentment seeing them  :)  Mostly I'm making them look nice because I have limited space so I figure the more orderly they are the more I can fit in and also it is my understanding that the wood needed to be stacked and stickered to prevent/reduce wood movement in drying. 

I think we all work hard for our lumber, I've read your thread and I know you work just as hard for yours as I do mine. I know there will be loss due to lack of knowledge as I learn how to do this but I'm trying to reduce that loss since I never know where my next log will come from.

It seems like we're always racing time, I know I feel a fair bit of pressure to get the logs milled and stacked but mostly that pressure is from myself.

Hope you were/are able to make the progress you wanted!

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 21, 2019, 08:35:33 AM
I'm assuming you're referring to the board on the outer edge closest to the photographer (away from the other stack of wood?)  I'll tack a note to it as OG says or write on the edge with a marker. I did notice as I was cutting some of the boards they wanted to start crooking... I hope it doesn't get too severe as it dries. Is there anything that I can do in the drying process to reduce this?


It's the one sitting your your table saw with the partial chainsaw cross cut into the bottom of it.  As far as stopping any movement during the drying process - that is actually where the chickens fit into all of this.  If your strapping doesn't do it then you can try sacrificing a few of the neighbor chickens and making the sign of the Santetia in their blood on the stack and hope for the best.  I am not sure how it actually helps with the process as I didn't develop the protocol, the credit belongs to @YellowHammer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=11488) I am mearly a dedicated believer.  :D

As far as sawing goes, it depends on the species and what you are producing but it's generally best to treat the heart wood and sapwood independently.  Either saw them free of each other, or balance the sapwood equally to the sides of the heartwood.  The latter can produce some very nice visual effect and will tend to behave in most species enough to finish off fine.  Running in and out of the heartwood along a board will cause it to bow for the same reasons as it crooks.  That's where log handling comes into play and rolling the logs, think canthook,  I realize you are using a CSM so it limits what you can do in the log, but when edging / resawing on your table or band saw the same principals will apply.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 21, 2019, 09:57:58 AM
I'm assuming you're referring to the board on the outer edge closest to the photographer (away from the other stack of wood?)  I'll tack a note to it as OG says or write on the edge with a marker. I did notice as I was cutting some of the boards they wanted to start crooking... I hope it doesn't get too severe as it dries. Is there anything that I can do in the drying process to reduce this?


It's the one sitting your your table saw with the partial chainsaw cross cut into the bottom of it.  As far as stopping any movement during the drying process - that is actually where the chickens fit into all of this.  If your strapping doesn't do it then you can try sacrificing a few of the neighbor chickens and making the sign of the Santetia in their blood on the stack and hope for the best.  I am not sure how it actually helps with the process as I didn't develop the protocol, the credit belongs to @YellowHammer (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=11488) I am mearly a dedicated believer.  :D
The poor chickens  :D :D Thanks for clarifying which board you meant. I should be able to locate it and mark it. I have a number of boards like that with the mix of sap and heartwood. At least if they move a lot I'll have a better idea as to why.

As far as sawing goes, it depends on the species and what you are producing but it's generally best to treat the heart wood and sapwood independently.  Either saw them free of each other, or balance the sapwood equally to the sides of the heartwood.  The latter can produce some very nice visual effect and will tend to behave in most species enough to finish off fine.  Running in and out of the heartwood along a board will cause it to bow for the same reasons as it crooks.  That's where log handling comes into play and rolling the logs, think canthook,  I realize you are using a CSM so it limits what you can do in the log, but when edging / resawing on your table or band saw the same principals will apply.  

In my mind the only real limitation to CSM is how much I want to turn the log and set the ladder up for a flat first cut... I find the set up rather tedious and boring but I'll have to get over that if I want to maximize usable lumber.

I'd imagine this is also where trying to center the pith comes in. I'll have to brain storm a bit on how to do it with a CSM.

All good information, thank you! I have a binder where I've been printing out the government info on logging and drying, I'll have to start writing/typing up a lot of this information and include it in the binder as SOP.

Brandon


Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 24, 2019, 10:01:30 AM
Not milling related (yet  ;D) but was helping a neighbor move some dirt he had left over from finishing his yard. I left my little S10 at his house so he could load the dirt while I was at work so we could make it to the landfill before it closed. I told him "you can load it until the bed hits the stops no problem." While he was stringing lights on his roof his wife and daughter were throwing dirt in the bed when I arrived. I look and it's sitting REAL low to the ground, tires bulging a bit. Well I've been wanting to find out how much the little thing can haul (they did offer to shovel some of the dirt out.) 

We drive real slow to the landfill, have to pull over a few times to let traffic doing the speed limit pass but we make it. Weigh in, unload, weigh out... 2300 lbs of dirt in my little truck  ;D ;D ;D ;D  Quarter Ton my eye. 

That being said, I don't plan to make THAT weight a regular habit, I'd prefer it was a one time thing. Just cause it worked once doesn't mean that repeating it won't bust it. Still pretty cool/funny/alarming to have done it once and it's not a "I'm guesstimating the weight at.."

Good neighbor, they put a tarp in the bed that covered the sides to try and reduce scratching... like I'd notice scratches on my old truck. Still I did appreciate the respect for my property and he is now on the short list of people I'll likely loan stuff to. 

Since we'd been discussing overloading vehicles before, thought I'd post this. I'm still chuckling a bit over it. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: YellowHammer on November 24, 2019, 12:11:51 PM
Chickens are a important part of the drying process, especially when things go a little sideways. 

I have given detailed chicken protocol advice to several people on this Forum and it hasnt failed yet.  We even discussed it at length at the last Project in Georgia, and it must have ranked right up there with other very technical drying topics such as preventing honeycomb, wet bulb readings, and such.  

KFC or Popeyes is a good substitute and certainly makes a frustrating drying situation go easier.  


Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: btulloh on November 24, 2019, 01:00:48 PM
Got behind this on the highway the other day. 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39962/0228EDC1-EB37-4E1A-8574-83E28D0A8854.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1574618252)
 
Seemed to be heading towards @Southside (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24297) s house. Dont know, just sayin.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 24, 2019, 09:11:11 PM
Why didn't you wave at me?  I was just taking the family out for a ride.   :D  :D  :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on November 24, 2019, 09:12:41 PM
Southside, :D  :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 25, 2019, 06:24:56 PM
Staring out the window at the snowfall, it's starting to stick a bit. Weather forecast still saying it's supposed to last until the weekend. Other than not liking snow in general I'm surprisingly not too bummed out. Went and bought drywall for the basement on Saturday so I didn't have to haul it in the wet, I planned ahead a bit  ;) ;) Between overtime at work and finishing the basement, I shouldn't be too bored until I can mill again :)

I'm thinking I'll try and build a jig of sorts I can mount on my bench in the basement that will hold chainsaw chains so I can sharpen them. I could take the chainsaw in but I'm trying to avoid that as much as possible, gas engines really should stay outside as much as possible to my way of thinking. I should have enough scrap angle iron and other bits and pieces around to do it, I just have to find the ambition to work in the cold garage  ;D  Hopefully I'll have the chains nice and sharp so that if/when the weather breaks and is decent for a bit I can get out and mill those two logs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96I7OLDXQt4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96I7OLDXQt4)   This guy is fun to watch and seems to know his stuff.

Watched the youtube video of the fellow building the nice garden bench with a back from logs he'd CSM'd and it got me really thinking hard. I may try and take one of the logs and try to do something like that. I keep thinking about what OG said about building a bench and sealing it while it was green for one of his neighbors. I don't understand building with green wood, goes counter to just about everything I've learned, so I should try building something and see how it dries and acts.

Well back to work

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 25, 2019, 08:23:03 PM
You'd be surprised Brandon. I don't think I have tried straight green healthy trees yet, but dead standing trees can dry fairly quickly because they really only have the moisture that they hold from rain, etc. It's partly why I did that bench as a test. I will try to get a look at it this weekend if I can and see how it is doing.
 Benches like the one in the video have a life. They last as long as they are cared for. Without a finish, I am doubtful it will last too long, maybe 10 years if not in direct ground contact.
 Get in there and try it, you will learn a lot, just keep it small until your confidence grows.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 25, 2019, 08:47:06 PM
What kind of finish can be applied to green wood? Would Tung Oil soak in very well?

When the fellow in the video commented about glue not working well on wet wood my immediate thought was of Gorrilla glue since it's SOP to wet the boards to activate the glue. I want to try it.

As you say, I need to try some stuff to see what works and what doesn't go how I expect and why. I can read all I want, reading is excellent, but at some point I need to try. Bright side is I'm only out the cost of fuel as I'm not paying money for the logs I'm getting. 

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 25, 2019, 09:02:55 PM
I use either tung oil or danish oil (danish comes in a few shades) and I am still experimenting, that's why I do these small benches then give them away. After it dries (24 hours or less) I put one or more coats of verathane (polyurethane) on it to seal it. To my mind this helps to slow or stop the drying and prevents much movement. This may be all wrong, but that is the theory I am working on anyway.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on November 25, 2019, 09:32:27 PM
I think as dry as your climate is I think your basement wood should come down to a reasonable level fairly quickly. The wood I stacked has changed faster than I thought it woulld.  I think you could mess with it while your drywall mud is drying and see what you get.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 25, 2019, 10:07:51 PM
wet wood is a relative term.  over 100% is too wet for most finish.  oil will be cloudy, and water based may not cure.  tung and Danish will not soak into really wet wood.  the 20% or less will do better.  outside benches will acclimate at 10 to 12 % or so.  the gorilla glue works with wet wood, but will foam up a bit and be a little bit of a mess.  good to experiment with.  and the brand has several types of glue. a three leg bench will set ok even with some twisting.  rustic wet wood stuff, requires some design elements to be considered.  carry on! 8)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 01:13:14 AM
I'll see what I can get out of the two remaining logs. 

I already have almost enough to make 2 Adirondack chairs, if I can get enough to make 2 more or even just a third I'll count that a win and try something creative with the remaining log.

The one with the crotch at the top has me puzzled as to how to turn it into regular lumber so I'm thinking a bench sorta like the one in the youtube vid might be just the ticket and would be fun to try. I won't know how feasible it is until I can get out an take some measurements. I've noticed things kinda grow or shrink or distort in my memory  ::) ::) 

Tomorrow it's only forecasted to snow for a few hours so maybe I'll get lucky and Wednesday will be the same and I can get some milling done... wonder if the wife would be mad if I was milling a bit on Thanksgiving day  :D :D would be nice to get those boards in the basement drying a bit while over the winter. As Nebraska pointed out, would give me something to tinker with while the mud is drying.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on November 26, 2019, 09:00:01 AM
the chaotic pattern of crotch wood is interesting and pretty, but makes it dry with some contortion.  so you can live with it (rustic) or dry it and re-flatten it.  it is good to know what your plans are for it.  If no plans, then dry it and let the end result speak to you.  It is fun to have a hoard of wood, and when you need something, you then choose from the stash.  You may find you are showing off your slabs, like they are children, to friends when they come over. sounds like you having fun, and we are all rooting for you!  take care.
p.s. the ramble of grain also make a branch point weak, this is true in arteries as well.  if a blood vessel breaks or has an aneurysm, it is often at a branch point.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 09:39:00 AM
the chaotic pattern of crotch wood is interesting and pretty, but makes it dry with some contortion.  so you can live with it (rustic) or dry it and re-flatten it.  it is good to know what your plans are for it.  If no plans, then dry it and let the end result speak to you.  It is fun to have a hoard of wood, and when you need something, you then choose from the stash.  
Good to now about the contortion when drying of crotch wood, I suspected there would be some uniqueness about it with the grain changing. Up till now I've milled just to mill, gain experience, see what's what, etc. These logs are the first ones I've milled in which I'm trying to mill with more of an end goal in mind. So far it's gone pretty well :)  I'm curious to open up the two remaining logs and see what the grain looks like as they both have/had branches coming off... also see if there's any hidden gems  :o :o
I do want a small hoard of wood, would really satisfy that little kid in me that didn't have nice wood. It's rather silly but I get a lot of satisfaction looking at my little stack of wood and wonder what some of it will ultimately become  ??? ???  I'm hoping there's a few cool wall clocks, a cutting board or two, there's the chairs and maybe some cabinets for the reloading bench, but what about the rest, what will it ultimately grow up to be  :) :)

You may find you are showing off your slabs, like they are children, to friends when they come over. 
I have already done this  :D :D  


sounds like you having fun, and we are all rooting for you!  take care.
I am having a lot of fun! In addition to a wealth of knowledge everyone, on the forum is a kind of positive peer pressure to keep moving forward even if it's only a little. There's been a few times where I get a bit discouraged or overwhelmed and I've thought of something someone posted and it gives me perspective and helps me move forward. Most often it's just to not overthink stuff, have a rough plan and then just get to it. If something doesn't go the way I wanted or thought it should I post seeking advice or post so others can learn from my experience (see I didn't say mistake  ;) so long as you learn from it it's not a mistake, was reminded of that on the forum  :) :) ) 

p.s. the ramble of grain also make a branch point weak, this is true in arteries as well.  if a blood vessel breaks or has an aneurysm, it is often at a branch point.
Interesting some of the principles that cross over from animals and plants/trees. It's little gems like this that I really enjoy, thanks!


Brandon 




Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 09:41:51 AM
Another random unrelated post  :o :o

A few months ago I bought a two stage snowblower for $100. After buying it I did some research and found out it'd been made sometime in the late 70's early 80's. Thing is a tank and in really good condition, especially when you consider its age. 

Got to use it last night for the first time  8) 8) 8)  Still learning some of its quirks but so far I'm loving it!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 09:47:04 AM
I've been reading in other posts about spalting and done some searching but have a few questions.

It sounds like there are some species more prone to spalting than others, maple being the one that comes readily to mind. Is this something that I can encourage somehow and if so how? Do I just seal the ends of the log, elevate it off the ground so it doesn't rot, leave the bark on and just wait a year or so before milling it?

Spalting is the discoloration of the wood due to fungal growth, how does one know the discoloration is due to spalting and not something else?

Is the coloration of rainbow poplar due to spalting? MAN that is some amazing looking wood I've seen in some of the other posts, just incredible. Hopefully one day I get lucky and some comes my way!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 26, 2019, 10:10:11 AM
I have seen some spalting in birch as well as maple. The birch bark is very water proof so it will rot out faster than maple, I have found birch completely rotted out on the ground in the woods before with nothing left but the bark still sitting there in the original shape.

I watched the video in previous post (thanks for posting it), my back hurt watching him wrestle those slabs. I was thinking that the crotch end of the log would have made better legs for stability.  

Did you notice he did his milling down hill?
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 01:52:16 PM
I have seen some spalting in birch as well as maple. The birch bark is very water proof so it will rot out faster than maple, I have found birch completely rotted out on the ground in the woods before with nothing left but the bark still sitting there in the original shape.

I watched the video in previous post (thanks for posting it), my back hurt watching him wrestle those slabs. I was thinking that the crotch end of the log would have made better legs for stability.  

Did you notice he did his milling down hill?
I did notice he use a decline to his advantage. I need to remember that. Any thing to save some energy is a good thing :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Southside on November 26, 2019, 02:22:37 PM
Any hardwood will spalt, I suspect it's true in softwood as well but I just have not seen it.  Basically it's like making cheese, you are dealing with decay and just have to get the speed and timing right before it goes too far.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 04:57:41 PM
Spent a couple hours trying to make the chain jig this morning... made a lot of metal dust but no jig. Ultimately I resorted to clamping the bar in the vise and used a bungie cord to provide tension to the chain. Works well enough.

Spent time trying to make all the cutters the same length on one of my chains using a micrometer. Not trying to get them .001 the same, I'll accept .005 +/-. It's tedious and time consuming and I'm rather hoping it'll turn out to be a total waste of time so I don't have to keep doing it  ;D ;D  I'm trying to see if having the cutters all the same length will result in a smoother cut.

Most of the time it won't really matter since the board will go through a planer later but if I'm going to be building benches I may want to leave the board as is instead of sanding or planing.

Also changing the angle to a ripping chain instead of the cross cut. This is proving to be a bit more interesting since my jig is set up for 35deg so I'm just eyeballing it and also still learning how to be consistent in my filing. Curious to see how these changes affect the cut. I've been pretty happy using cross cut chains for milling but people keep saying ripping chains are faster or provide a smoother cut or other things. Kinda playing around just to see what happens and if these changes are something I want to pursue for future milling, special situations, or just doesn't matter enough to me.

Anyone got thoughts or can explain why the 10deg angle is better for ripping than the 35?

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 26, 2019, 05:13:03 PM
The 35 for crosscut will pull side to side and cause a ripple in the wood, 10 will not pull as much. Like a ripping blade in a table saw there is no need to have a angle on the tooth for rip cuts.

I ended up sharpening my ripping chain at 0 it cut the smoothest and there was no need to reset the grinder for each side, I was using .404 skip tooth harvester chain with 50 thousand depth of cut on the rakers (16 horsepower) so it was really grabby and with a 35 tooth angle it would leave a 1/8" deep ripple on the wood.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 26, 2019, 05:39:34 PM
For hand filing for getting all the angles (what ever angle you choose) the same I was using a bar mount filing guide. It lets you set the angle, file height and has a stop to get all your teeth the same length. With this and a raker depth guide you can get your chains to cut really well right to the last bit when the teeth start breaking off.

Not sure what brand the guide was but a quick search shows poor reviews for the Oregon ones with complaints of flimsy, too much plastic. I see the Granberg one looks all metal.

https://granberg.com/product/g106b-file-n-joint-low-profile/ (https://granberg.com/product/g106b-file-n-joint-low-profile/)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 06:35:35 PM
For hand filing for getting all the angles (what ever angle you choose) the same I was using a bar mount filing guide. It lets you set the angle, file height and has a stop to get all your teeth the same length. With this and a raker depth guide you can get your chains to cut really well right to the last bit when the teeth start breaking off.

Not sure what brand the guide was but a quick search shows poor reviews for the Oregon ones with complaints of flimsy, too much plastic. I see the Granberg one looks all metal.

https://granberg.com/product/g106b-file-n-joint-low-profile/ (https://granberg.com/product/g106b-file-n-joint-low-profile/)

Sweet! I just placed an order for one, should arrive Tuesday.  Much as I want to be that guy that gets amazing results filing free hand I think a good jig would be better and the price on this one is right. 

Also, thanks for the info on the angles. I think I understand what you're saying about ripples/waves in relation to cutter angle. 

Thanks for posting the info!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 26, 2019, 07:43:35 PM
I found a picture of an early board before I started to change the chain angle that shows the ripples (for lack of a better description), it is a corner board on our backwoods camp. I took the picture to show a friend the bear tooth and claw marks in the board. 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18975/20191014_153847.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574815173)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 26, 2019, 08:00:04 PM
I found a picture of an early board before I started to change the chain angle that shows the ripples (for lack of a better description), it is a corner board on our backwoods camp. I took the picture to show a friend the bear tooth and claw marks in the board.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18975/20191014_153847.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574815173)

Ok, I see what you're talking about. You're waves are a bit more consistent than mine :) but I have the same thing. 

Hopefully with the jig I can get more consistent sharpening angles and tooth lengths (assuming I don't hit something :( )  It's not such a bit deal when cross cutting to fell a tree or buck a board but I'm starting to think it'll be a bit more important to me when it comes to milling as I move forward and work to improve my skills.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on November 26, 2019, 08:09:10 PM
I was pulling the saw through the log with a boat winch so it made a more consistent pattern.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on November 27, 2019, 02:15:42 AM
Ultimately I resorted to clamping the bar in the vise and used a bungie cord to provide tension to the chain.
 
I just set the chain brake and file several teeth.  Release it, move the chain and repeat.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on November 27, 2019, 09:39:04 AM

Anyone got thoughts or can explain why the 10deg angle is better for ripping than the 35?

Brandon
I have been meaning to respond to this, but I knew it would take some time, and I finally have a little. I mentioned some of the background of these comments in another thread post I made a few minutes ago (would like some advice in Sawmills and Milling (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108521.msg1694538#msg169453) ) so I won't repeat that stuff here.
 In understanding how a tooth cuts it helps to remember that the tooth is pushing against the wood, while at the same time the wood is pushing back (resisting), this goes on until one of them wins (hopefully the tooth wins) and a chip is formed. Now with that picture in your head, look at how the tooth approaches the wood. If there is a 35 angle on the front of the tooth, that means that when the wood resists, the tooth slips off to the side a little until it builds enough force to lift a chip off, and then it begins to cut a little freer until it starts the process on the next chip. This process is repeated over and over by every tooth. The more side angle you have on the tooth face, the more side deflection you will get. Now in a tooth form with 0-10 of front angle, this 'side load' is greatly reduced or eliminated (0). Because you are cutting WITH the grain, you have continuous contact with solid wood (as opposed to cutting and breaking fibers in a crosscut) so you will get those long noodle like chips.
 I am not sure if I explained this clearly, but that's how the tooth cuts. I hope this may have been slightly helpful to somebody.
Tom
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on November 27, 2019, 10:55:28 AM

Anyone got thoughts or can explain why the 10deg angle is better for ripping than the 35?

Brandon
I have been meaning to respond to this, but I knew it would take some time, and I finally have a little. I mentioned some of the background of these comments in another thread post I made a few minutes ago (would like some advice in Sawmills and Milling (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108521.msg1694538#msg169453) ) so I won't repeat that stuff here.
 In understanding how a tooth cuts it helps to remember that the tooth is pushing against the wood, while at the same time the wood is pushing back (resisting), this goes on until one of them wins (hopefully the tooth wins) and a chip is formed. Now with that picture in your head, look at how the tooth approaches the wood. If there is a 35 angle on the front of the tooth, that means that when the wood resists, the tooth slips off to the side a little until it builds enough force to lift a chip off, and then it begins to cut a little freer until it starts the process on the next chip. This process is repeated over and over by every tooth. The more side angle you have on the tooth face, the more side deflection you will get. Now in a tooth form with 0-10 of front angle, this 'side load' is greatly reduced or eliminated (0). Because you are cutting WITH the grain, you have continuous contact with solid wood (as opposed to cutting and breaking fibers in a crosscut) so you will get those long noodle like chips.
 I am not sure if I explained this clearly, but that's how the tooth cuts. I hope this may have been slightly helpful to somebody.
Tom
OG, thanks for the detailed explanation! This helps a lot and clarified a number of things for me.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 03, 2019, 09:51:32 AM
Haven't really done much on the milling front, it keeps snowing here. I don't mind working in the snow and cold but I don't feel like cleaning up sopping wet sawdust, sounds unpleasant to me. I may have to get over than though  :D

I had a couple days off last week with the holiday and was mostly unproductive but I did work on my basement. My sons room is almost drywalled and ready for mudding. I'm going a bit slow around the window as I've never framed in a window that has cement around it so I'm taking my time to try and do it right. I'd hate to have to redo it because the drywall soaked up moisture from the cement or things settled wrong. I'm pretty sure I've figured out how I'm going to do it and will get started on it tomorrow. I'll have to post a few pics even though it's not milling related. 

Funny story though, my kids kept thinking all the firewood and logs I was getting was so I could finish the basement  :D  Now that I have a milling attachment I guess I could use some for that but don't have any plans to at this moment. 

The sharpening jig is supposed to arrive today, early Christmas to me!! I'll take some time to be rediculously meticulous in sharpening a couple of my chains for milling. I'm thinking I'll have a few for milling (3 or 4 eventually I hope that way if I find treasures with them I can quickly swap out and keep going) a couple that are sharpened meticulously for cross cutting and then a few that are for felling and other things where the cut quality (ie smoothness) just doesn't matter and I can resharpen in the field as needed. It'll give me something to putter with while the weather is cold and I'm waiting for money for the supplies to finish the basement. I also think I'll pull my jack planes out of storage and hope they are still in good condition and play around a bit with flattening the maple I cut, wow about 6 months ago. How the time flies when you're having fun with man glitter  8) 8)

What has me thinking about cut quality on the cross cuts is I was contacted by a lady who wanted to rent some cookies for her sons wedding. I posted a listing on the local version of CL indicating I was interested in logs for milling and to contact me. I explained I was a hobbyist chainsaw miller, no I won't cut down the tree but once it's on the ground I'd be happy to work with it, etc. I'm sure I could do a better job on the ad but it was a start. So far no real takers BUT I'm guessing the lady wanting the cookies put two and two together that I would be using the stuff for crafts and might have cookies lying around. I don't and she needed them by this weekend and as much as I'd have liked to oblige I decided it wasn't worth the rush/stress and likely inability to get a product out that I was ok with. BUT it got me thinking about cutting and drying cookies and other things that are popular with weddings, parties etc. 

I searched the forum and also google and found some interesting stuff. Two methods I may try that I read about. First is using denatured alcohol, soak the cookie in it and the alcohol displaces the water but doesn't cause cracking. The second is soaking the cookie in a sugar bath solution, I'm assuming the sugar is soaked up and takes the place of the water which would reduce shrinking and hopefully reduce cracking. I like both of these ideas as I think they'd both be food safe/nontoxic. I read about using PEG and several other ideas but the two I mentioned seem like the easiest for me to start with. I also read that cutting cookies at an angle so the grain isn't exactly 90deg to the cut helps. I'd finish the cookies with Tung oil or uerathane. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on December 03, 2019, 09:58:00 AM
sing denatured alcohol, soak the cookie in it and the alcohol displaces the water but doesn't cause cracking

For alcohol, anti-freeze is supposed to be good (but toxic).  I think I read you could use RV anti-freeze (used in the water system) that is non-toxic and not too expensive.  Might be worth a try.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 03, 2019, 11:00:43 AM
7 or 8 years ago I was going to build a nice wood working table. Got the top done, no longer have it but along the way I had purchased or inherited a number of tools. They've been in this tote since then

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0336.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1575388480)

Pulled them out, they look to be in as good a condition as when I packed them away  8)  Even found I had a few I don't remember buying, bonus!

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0337.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1575388480)

Now the hard part, where to store them all so they are easy to get to but out of the way. Good thing I still have a bunch of those locust stickers I cut, they worked great for the chisels

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0338.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1575388481)

Not sure where everything will end up ultimately but for now they can hang out in the "man cave". Who knows, might even keep me focused on finishing the basement sooner  :)

That's likely all the progress I'll make today as I have an interview in an hour, wish me luck!

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on December 03, 2019, 05:53:20 PM
not sure if antifreeze would work.  it is ethylene glycol, and PEG is polyethylene glycol.  hooking all the molecules together makes it non toxic.  PEG has diff. concentrations, and dictates how long it has to soak.  I have used it, but expensive.  that is why denatured from Menards for 32 bucks for 5 gallons is how I have gone.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 04, 2019, 08:15:42 PM
First interview went well, well enough that I have the second one tomorrow  8) 8)  I'll know by Friday end of shift if I get the position, gotta love when they move fast  ;D

More milling related, got the Granberg sharpening jig. Took me a bit to figure out how to set it up and use it. It's not complicated and the instructions are pretty clear... clear enough that once I'd done it wrong for a bit and was thinking "dang I wish they'd have done this or that" and I looked at the pics real close it started to click. Seriously, not dogging them mostly poking fun at myself. I sharpened one chain to a 0deg, took a couple hours to do but all the cutters are the same size so I'm excited to see how it works. Going forward I'll reserve that chain for any milling that needs to be really nice since and I'll start converting cross cut chains as they need to be sharpened. Here's a pic of the jig

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0339.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1575508370)

Well worth the money IMO.

Also worked on my boys room, nearly done with hanging the drywall. Started gluing the insulation around the window, should be able to frame it in here soon and get the rest of the drywall up.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0340.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1575508370)

All in all a decent day. Hopefully the weather clears enough soon so I can mill another of those logs.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 06, 2019, 09:06:54 AM
For anyone following the sub story, I had my second interview yesterday and I feel like I was prepared and did the best I've ever done on an interview. I feel like it was a solid showing of who I am and what I can bring to that position and I honestly think I'd do very well (doesn't everyone who applies? ;)). I was told they were going to have an answer by the end of the day... and then at end of day got an email saying they were going to have to delay giving an answer till next week  :( :(  AAARGH. I'm pretty sure I know why they delayed, some more candidates were applying that they really wanted to consider. A couple of them are fellow team mates so while I'm disappointed with the delay I'm glad my team mates are getting a chance. So now I get to wait...  :P

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on December 06, 2019, 10:43:58 AM
I have been following that line and wish you the best of luck. Be happy it's not the company I worked for where it can take 4 week to hire an entry level person and over 6 months to hire management level. Sounds like your dealing with a fairly clear cut process anyway. It also sounds like this is for an internal position within your current company?
Anyway, best of luck. Find something to occupy your mind while you wait. Go hang some sheet rock or something. ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 06, 2019, 06:15:06 PM
They are moving on it fast, I shouldn't complain. I just hate the anticipation  :) :)

It's a temporary position within my current company, they call it a Temporary Development Opportunity. It's a good chance to try something new, learn a bunch of new stuff and possibly it can turn permanent but even if it doesn't, I become that much more skilled. I'm fortunate that I like what I do right now and if I don't get it it's not devastating other than to my ego.

While I feel a bit anxious about it for the most part I'm pretty zen. I guess I really do feel like I did the best I could which is all I can do. I'd be bummed if I didn't get it but I actually am pleased with the prep I did and my overall performance during the interview. 

I'll take your advice and work on my boys room or sharpen some more chains or something. I have no shortage of things I can do... usually just a shortage of ambition  :D :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 11, 2019, 04:36:12 PM
Yesterday I was trying to decide, go and try to pick up more logs or mill the ones I have. I ultimately decided to stay home and mill what I had as the drive to pick up logs was an hour each way and they said it was mostly cottonwood. I'm interested in milling cottonwood but not right now. Too bad though, they had heavy equipment and would have loaded it in the back of my truck for me so I could have had longer logs. Awesome opportunity, not the right time for me. 

So I grabbed my newly sharpened chains and gear and started milling. I will say that Granberg jig is awesome!

I decided to do this log

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0343.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098965)

First cut revealed nice wood

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0344.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098976)

Rolled it on the side and set up for the next cut

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0345.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098548)

Lots of cuts. I really need to get the 36" bar and jig made. I was half an inch to wide so grabbed the spare saw and shaved the side

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0347.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098988)

 I had to do some hack and slash to get it down to fit my set up which I end up regretting later

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0346.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098982)

Here's why I regretted the crappy trim job

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0350.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576098993)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0351.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576099001)

The coloring doesn't quite come through in the photo but in person it's really nice. I'm hoping once it dries I can sand and polish it and it'll be amazing

I was plugging along real smooth but ended up developing a rainbow in my cutting. Pretty sure it's due to entering the log and a bad angle. The weather was threatening to turn bad so I decided to go from the other side and just get narrower boards. I hated to lose the pretty figuring in the wood but there was only a couple more boards in it that way so it wasn't a huge loss. I think I ended up with 8 boards with the nice figuring in it. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0352.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576099013)

Sure cuts faster when you have a narrower log  ;D

Ended up with a lot of usable wood so I'm thrilled

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0353.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1576099023)

This log did have some of the pith cracking like the other one so I did my best to rotate the log and mill with that in mind. It wasn't perfect but I feel it was an improvement.  All in all a good day  :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on December 11, 2019, 04:43:23 PM
Nice looking stuff!  How long would you say it took you to mill that up?  Just curious as I think I could mill that on my band saw mill in half an hour, 45 minutes tops.  And probably 2 or 3 more boards due to the thinner kerf.  Not trying to sway you, but I think a band mill is in your future. ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on December 11, 2019, 05:53:01 PM
Glad the sharpening jig is working out for you!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 11, 2019, 10:45:23 PM
Nice looking stuff!  How long would you say it took you to mill that up?  Just curious as I think I could mill that on my band saw mill in half an hour, 45 minutes tops.  And probably 2 or 3 more boards due to the thinner kerf.  Not trying to sway you, but I think a band mill is in your future. ;)
All told about 4 hours give or take. It is a lot more labor intensive and the kerf is definitely more wasteful but I'm happy with it for the time being :) It's perfect for the small stuff I do now and when I'm done it doesn't take up much room  ;D   
I won't say I'll never have a band mill, I certainly wouldn't turn one down if the chance arises. But I'm enjoying the chainsaw mill for now. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 14, 2019, 08:49:20 AM
Last update on the sub story. I didn't get the position. 

While I don't like being told no for something I wanted I'm actually ok with not getting the position. The whole process got me thinking about moving up and gave me practice with interviewing. I feel I prepared very well for the interviews and can say without reservation that I did my best and I actually find that makes me feel ok about the whole thing. I'll be meeting with the supervisor that did the interviews to get feedback on what I did well and where I can improve so going forward I'm that much better. I also talked with a couple of my coworkers that applied for the same position and didn't get it and one of them commented that talking with me made him feel better about the whole situation so *shrug* All in all I feel it was a very positive experience and I feel rather optimistic going forward  8)  Thanks all for your support and well wishes on this one it meant a lot :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on December 14, 2019, 10:51:40 AM
It is tuff, but good experience.  We had a recent hire for manager, and the two folks were nearly equal on paper, one was older and she got it.  my input to the director was I could be happy with either one.  but only one position.  almost a flip of a coin.  I am sure you would have done a great job, but sometimes the move up, takes the fun out of it and grants a whole new set of concerns.  Best regards!  Doc
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 14, 2019, 11:46:12 AM
It is tuff, but good experience.  We had a recent hire for manager, and the two folks were nearly equal on paper, one was older and she got it.  my input to the director was I could be happy with either one.  but only one position.  almost a flip of a coin.  I am sure you would have done a great job, but sometimes the move up, takes the fun out of it and grants a whole new set of concerns.  Best regards!  Doc
Very true. 
Thanks Doc :)
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: donbj on December 14, 2019, 01:23:46 PM
Last update on the sub story. I didn't get the position.

While I don't like being told no for something I wanted I'm actually ok with not getting the position. The whole process got me thinking about moving up and gave me practice with interviewing. I feel I prepared very well for the interviews and can say without reservation that I did my best and I actually find that makes me feel ok about the whole thing. I'll be meeting with the supervisor that did the interviews to get feedback on what I did well and where I can improve so going forward I'm that much better. I also talked with a couple of my coworkers that applied for the same position and didn't get it and one of them commented that talking with me made him feel better about the whole situation so *shrug* All in all I feel it was a very positive experience and I feel rather optimistic going forward  8)  Thanks all for your support and well wishes on this one it meant a lot :)

Brandon
That stuff does bite, but your attitude speaks volumes. That does not go unnoticed by those around you.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JJ on December 14, 2019, 01:47:55 PM
Brandon,
A positive attitude will carry you 90% of the way into your next adventure.   Its the #1 thing I look for when I am interviewing candidates, as all the rest can be overcome with training, but positive can-do outlook cannot.   Keep the positive outlook, and good opportunities will come to you.   Like DocH said, it gets noticed just as much as a bad attitude which doesn't lead to any advancement.

Maybe it is a blessing as now you are not saddled in that temp position, leaving you free for your next opportunity, hopefully a permanent one.

    JJ
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on December 15, 2019, 11:14:23 AM
I like your thinking.  No need to over analyze the whys or be bitter.  It's good to know what to improve and then look to the future.

There have been a handful of jobs I interviewed for that I didn't get for one reason or another.  It didn't matter in the long run because I positioned myself for something else and moved forward.  Things always turned out better than I expected.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on December 15, 2019, 10:12:07 PM
Sorry about the disappointment, it sounds like you've got it handled pretty well. I know I've read somewhere that "man glitter"  has healing powers. ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on December 16, 2019, 07:10:24 AM
Sorry about the job, but your attitude about the whole thing is just right. I have told myself as much when going through disappointment in the past. Believing it is tougher than saying it. Sounds like you believe it and it speaks a lot about your character. Good on you.  I hope you were able to get in some therapy time over the weekend.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/52103/DSCF3392.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1576497996)
 


 When your boots look like this there is usually some sort of smile to go with it. :)
Keep on truckin'!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 16, 2019, 07:46:46 PM
Thanks all for the support and kind words, really it's appreciated! 

Nebraska, that must be IT! It's all the man glitter lately, I was healed!!!  8) 8)

OG Them boots have seem some miles :)  No therapy other than the milling on Wednesday but the boards were so nice that I'm still smiling. Fortunately I have other projects to keep me occupied while mother nature blesses us with moisture.

SawyerTed, you're absolutely right. Things always turn out better than I expected or could have planned for. Just have to be patient in the mean time, which isn't hard when you have a chainsaw :)
JJ, that's a really good point. Maybe I didn't get it because something more permanent is in the works  8)

donbj, you're right. Positiveity has a power of sorts for sure and people notice it.

Thanks again all. I'm fortunate that I like what I do now so not getting the position isn't some awful catastrophy. I'll work on improving some of my skills and when the next opportunity comes along I'll be that much better. I've already scheduled a followup with the hiring manager to discuss what I did well and where I can improve. No reason to waste valuable feedback.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on December 25, 2019, 06:11:17 PM
I think I'm going through FF withdrawls  ;)  I haven't done much in the way of milling though I did get the boards from the last adventure stacked and stickered. My little unfinished bathroom is getting a bit full. Smells good though  :)

I'm taking it a bit easy right now, sharpening the chains, trying to pinch a few pennies to buy a bit of kit for next year and working a bit here and there on the basement.

Figured it'd been a few weeks since I'd posted and wanted to wish all my FF friends a MERRY CHRISTMAS!!! Hope everyone is safe and well.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on January 04, 2020, 07:28:29 AM
Hay @Manjisann ,you've been kinda quiet, whatcha been up to?
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 04, 2020, 07:58:07 AM
Hey OG, just been a bit distracted with some stuff. Thanks for checkin in on me though :)

I did get some more work done on my sons room

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0361.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1578142280)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0362.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1578142306)

I did use some of the waste cuts from the locust to build a frame to hang some peg boards on. Don't have a pic of it but I'll take one and post it when I have a chance. It's the first thing I've "built" with wood I milled  8) 8)  nothing to really get excited about but it's a cool progression in the man glitter madness  ;D ;D

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on January 04, 2020, 08:15:35 AM
Good on ya mate! Just keep moving forward. Get that done and you will have time when the weather improves to do the funner stuff. Speaking of which I am headed out to the shop now to reckon out my next conundrum. Keep on truckin'
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on January 04, 2020, 08:22:02 AM
Hey guys, I am smokin a pork butt for the ED Holiday party.  too busy over the actual holidays.  will have about 50 folks + family at our house.  stop by if you are in the neighborhood.  :D  have a great day!   8) 8) :) :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on January 04, 2020, 10:42:29 AM
Looks good Brandon, that's putting $ in your pocket. Your son will be fired up.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 23, 2020, 10:04:57 AM
While waiting for the mud to dry... or just because this seems more fun to me  ;) I've begun work on flattening the Maple I free hand milled last June. Some of this is pretty rough, twisted due to my lack of jig and or cutting skill, wedge shaped, etc. The moisture meter is putting it at around 10% but that's just on the surface, not sure what it is inside. My plan is to flatten on face and one edge so I can run in through the table saw, cut it to roughly finished size, check the MC and go from there. I plan to stack and sticker it in my basement to hopefully finish the drying process as that's where it'll live in it's finished form as hopefully a reloading bench top.

The start of the journey:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0042~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579790895)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0043~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791154)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0046~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791186)

As you can see, there's some variation on thickness and weird shaping in the stack

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0083~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791207)

Built a temporary work bench in my toy room 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0379.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791267)

This one was already fairly flat but still needed work

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0380.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791320)

Not perfect yet but getting close. Still need to flatten one of the edges as well.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0382.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1579791354)

Things I've learned so far. 

1. A Scrub Plane is an absolute must when flattening such rough boards, or at least a scrub plane blade in a short smoothing plane

2. The better the milling in the first place the less time it'll take to flatten and have a nice product

3. Hand planing is pretty physically demanding and blisters will happen

4. Carpal Tunnel is a drag

5. Sharpen blades frequently

6. Knots are a real bear to deal with, sharp plane blade is a must but even then it's not fun

7. Wax is your friend, a little wax on the plane sole and it'll glide like it's on bearings, seriously it's amazing the difference!

8. Shavings are almost as good as man glitter


I know what I want the end product to look like but I'm still working my way through the steps on how to get there. The bench top will be put together sort of like a hardwood floor with long sticks glued together in a staggered way to get the length I want. I'm trying to decide if I should do some sort of tongue and groove method or just glue flat sides to flat sides. Anyone got suggestions?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on January 23, 2020, 03:50:14 PM
you will have to re-flatten after glued up. so you need a flat side to make you edge joints perpendicular to 1 plane. biscuits or dowels will keep edges from sliding as you clamp the glue up.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 23, 2020, 04:20:11 PM
I was thinking instead of biscuits or dowel pins I could do a tongue and groove on the edges that will glue up. I expect to have to flatten it again as I've never been able to get things to line up perfect. 

Just pondering the return on investment of time vs end product on the various methods.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on January 23, 2020, 04:59:51 PM
tongue and groove is great but you sacrifice some material.  could cut two groves and use a spline.  even a strip of 1/4 inch ply.  could even make tight joints and not glue but make a top with joints held close, like a picnic table.  for reloading however, you do want the solid top.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 23, 2020, 05:25:58 PM
hmmm if I do the spline idea I could use a different type of wood/different color and the ends would be kinda decorative looking. Wish I had some dark black walnut or ebony. Something like that would really contrast and set off the whiteness of this maple.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on January 23, 2020, 05:41:11 PM
I don't suppose you know anybody with a jointer? If you could run your edges on that and then just glue and clamp you should be good to go and finish it up. I did that bar top back in august/September just that way. One of my test projects this winter is to try getting square edges with that hand power planer and trying the same glue up to see how true it comes out.
 Glad to see you are back at it. I should get my butt back in gear.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 23, 2020, 06:20:49 PM
I have a neighbor that has a woodshop and I'm sure I could borrow some time in it to use a jointer and thickness planer, so that's always an option. 

Right now I'm kinda just puttering in a general direction. I enjoy hand planing, good exercise and am currently of the mindset to see what I can do with the tools I have. I figure if I get one edge square and one face flat I can run the boards through the table saw and make 2x2's (or whatever dimension I finally decide.) I'm thinking this will allow me to do it with just what I have and I'm curious to see if I'm right. 

It's good to be back at it. When did your butt slip out of gear? I've been following your thread and you get more done sick in a day than I do feeling well in a week  :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: mkngjoy on January 29, 2020, 05:55:55 PM
On another note... sawdust accumulates so much faster than I expect. Went to empty the shopvac figuring it was about half full and saw this

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0331.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1574295415)

It's never a good thing when the filter is so packed in it pops off the motor  ::) ::)  I have to give Rigid props, it was still sucking up dust even though it was so full.
I know that this quote is from a month ago - but I've been reading through your adventures... which parallel mine with CSM, except i started on some much bigger logs (a story for my own thread, someday).

One easy suggestion that I didn't see mentioned to help with the sawdust clogging the filters of your shop vac is to add a dust separator in between the shop vac and your tools - either an Oneida Dust Deputy (there's a diy kit that's not that expensive), or the "DustTopper" which is sold at HD, and snaps onto a orange bucket.

The benefit of either is that most of the from your tools dust will get stopped in the separator, which in turn saves the shop-vac filter from getting clogged, and the shop-vac will stay mostly empty. I've had a separator before my shop vac (and a vacuum bag in the shopvac) for 3 years and *never* had to change the filter, or replace the bag.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustopper-High-Efficiency-Dust-Separator-12-in-Dia-with-2-5-in-Hose-36-in-Long-HD12/302643445 (https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dustopper-High-Efficiency-Dust-Separator-12-in-Dia-with-2-5-in-Hose-36-in-Long-HD12/302643445)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on January 30, 2020, 02:42:01 PM
mkngjoy, thanks for posting!  I think I'll be picking one of those up this weekend funds permitting.

I wish I had larger logs, or at least more of them. Fingers crossed that with the weather warming up a bit I can get a few more nice logs to cut!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 03, 2020, 09:53:31 AM
Woke up this morning to a bit of snow and a phone call that school was delayed a couple hours which means work is delayed a couple hours... kinda a mixed bag that one. So rather than go out and clear the walks I decided to catch up with my FF friends.  ;)

Been plugging away at planing the maple and either my skill is improving or I am just very lucky. The first few boards still had a wee bit of twist in them but as time has gone on I seem to be getting them flatter and flatter. I'm sure there is a faster way to do this but I'm in no hurry and I'm finding this to be excellent therapy time to work through the stuff life has been throwing at me lately... maybe shavings have the same magical properties as saw dust...
@doc henderson (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) is there any medicinal properties to wood shavings?  ;D ;D

Some of the boards have developed what I'm guessing is mold. Is this what is known as spalting?

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0385.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1580740507)

Whatever it is I kinda like it. Gives it some personality I think.

I bought an inexpensive hand plane I could tinker with and not feel bad if I ruin it while trying to turn it into more of a scrub plane. It is complete, I just have it apart before I thought to take pics

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0392.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1580740510)


Scribed a line to open the mouth up. I haven't hit the line yet and I may not open it up that much but it helps me ensure the mouth is file square.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0391.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1580741065)

The blade one the left is from one of my other planes where I had rounded it in a scrub plane profile. It's about a 8" circumference circle so nothing dramatic but it makes a huge difference in being able to take of a lot of wood in a short amount of time with minimal effort. The right blade is the one from the new to me plane, the marker is for grinding to the scrub plane profile. Takes a bit of work but not to bad and well worth it I think.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0393.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1580741278)

These boards have been flattened on one face and one edge. Progress!!!

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0394.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1580741466)

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 03, 2020, 11:22:35 AM

Some of the boards have developed what I'm guessing is mold. Is this what is known as spalting?
The fungal /bacterial entities  that attack wood to  break it down for their lunch leave a stain as they do their work. That stain they leave behind is what is referred to as spalting.
(Please correct me if I'm not right  FF brain trust)  
The mold on the suface of those boards  probably formed as it was initially drying in the basement because it was pretty wet when you brought it in. It may have also had some internal fungus because the tree was removed for a reason...  I think you would be able to prevent it from forming with a coat of solubor before you stack to dry. It helped my wet Ponderosa pine earlier when the weather warm outside. Probably should keep your mask on and protective eyewear when working it down,... which is a thing WE ALL should do any way present company included. For what it's worth my 2 cents.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 03, 2020, 12:17:40 PM
looks great @ManjiSann (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620) .  I think you are having a great time.  It is my understanding that the "scrub plane"  is for roughing things out.  some will use "winding sticks"  to visualize the twist in the length of a board so it can be corrected.  my favorite resource for all things old fashioned is Roy Underhill and the Woodwrights' shop.  I know he had a guest that spoke of sharpening and use of various planes.  I like his style yet he is well versed in the history.  He had some affiliation with a university in the past and has a school for woodworkers now.  I will see if I can find that one for you.  Also I am not an expert on "mold" specific to wood so will ask @GeneWengert-WoodDoc (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20498) to chime in.  there are all kinds of mold and subsequent "evidence" left behind.  spalting I think is more in sap wood and follow the grain to provide a great detail and many fine lines.  pine can get blue stain.  there is also black mold.  the health issues of most molds found in nature to humans is vastly overdone.  Yes you can develop and allergy to the mold spores if inhaled.  but does not affect many.  some in the western states (dig at California)  think it causes all sorts of disease including cancer.  I would be more concerned if sanding to a fine air born powder than making chips with a hand planer.  Using caution is ok, but I would not loose sleep over it.  most dry wood, the fungus is dead, but spores (like seeds) can live on.  much of the diseases are hypersensitivity developed by our immune system (like an allergy)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 03, 2020, 12:47:59 PM
Hand Plane Essentials with Chris Schwarz | Season 37 Episode 5 | The Woodwright's Shop | PBS (https://www.pbs.org/video/hand-plane-essentials-with-chris-schwarz-9qkzzm/)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 03, 2020, 01:50:03 PM
some in the western states (dig at California) think is causes all sorts of disease including cancer.
 
Nearly anything you buy out here has a "Prop. 65 Warning This product that is known to cause cancer in California"!  I'll have to look next time I'm in the grocery store to see if bottled water carries that warning,too ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 03, 2020, 01:51:52 PM
I know the government there is the issue not the great people of the state.  thanks for taking it in the spirit intended @ljohnsaw (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=20640)    :) :) :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 04, 2020, 10:24:25 AM
Thanks to FF Member BeenThere for pointing out I was missing a pic in the above post... corrected  :)

Doc, it's my understanding and also my process to use the scrub plane for when there's a lot of wood needing removal. Once it's roughed in then it's on to the other planes to smooth it out. One of these days I'll have to make some winding stick, for now I just use my 48" straight edge and my Mark 1 Eyeball and it seems to do the job. 

I'll have to check out the Woodwright's Shop episode, thanks for posting it!

I don't have an exact plan yet, at least not all the details but I feel like I'm heading in the general direction I want to go. Last night I picked up some of the Locust scraps and started planing one out with the hopes of making something to hang my hand planes on. I worry about them getting damaged in the current crazy mess. I'll post pics if it goes any further than just making a few shavings.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: mredden on February 04, 2020, 11:56:16 AM
@ManjiSann (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=46620) That mold looks like plain old black mold that grows in moist places and can be dangerous to human health. Spalting is more of staining over a number of years in the wood rather than on the surface of the wood as appears over a short period of time.

When black mold appears on my boards, (I live in a very humid area) I spray it with vinegar and sand it while wet so I don't breathe the powdery spores. Then, I spray one more time and let it soak into the area to kill the spores below the surface. Vinegar doesn't stain the wood.

Vinegar is a magical substance with 1000 uses in woodworking, rust fighting and cleaning. Certainly safer than bleach. Actually more effective for mold killing.  Yes, it's an acid - but an edible one that's easy to neutralize with baking soda.

(https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2016-08/5/9/campaign_images/buzzfeed-prod-fastlane03/make-rusty-tools-good-as-new-with-this-natural-cl-2-5784-1470404161-1_dblbig.jpg)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 04, 2020, 03:11:35 PM
Interesting info on Vinegar, thanks!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 11, 2020, 07:52:16 PM
Stopping to check out a tree on my way home from work that I may try and pick up tomorrow. Looks like it may have barber chaired when whomever felled it did their thing. Looks like siberian elm, or some sort of elm.

Will the barber chair damage the surrounding wood such that it wouldn't be any good for milling? Keep in mind my idea of milling is a lot smaller than many of y'alls  ;)  I'm wondering if the wood would have splintered due to the stresses?

I'm 100% fine with experimentation but I don't need more firewood if I can avoid it, if you catch my meaning  ;D

Thanks,

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 11, 2020, 08:14:23 PM
it might since there is an incomplete hinge, and it splits up the tree.  you can prob work with it and there is only one way to find out!   :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 11, 2020, 08:42:08 PM
I agree with Doc, it's worth a look at least. I bet you can find a home for some firewood around there any way.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on February 11, 2020, 10:06:03 PM
Yeah, worth a look for sure. The few barber chaired pieces I have worked with show that the split is the split and you can deal with that. Just think of it as half a log. But some folks that cut trees can make a real mess out of them if the thing doesn't come down when it splits. I believe we are all thinking the same thing. You never know what you are going to find when you look at it. ;D
 It's kind of like when I ran on the ambulance. I would hammer into all my newbies "the emergency you arrive at is almost never the one you were dispatched to". (i.e. You are dispatched to a 'difficulty breathing' and arrive to find a patient in full cardiac arrest.) Same with trees. A few weeks ago, a co-worker came to me in a panic, said she had a huge tree snap off and block her road, did I know anybody that could help her on short notice. "Hw big is this tree" I asked. She said '5 feet is diameter'. Yeah I did. My son was free. I went up a couple of hours later to see this 5 foot diameter tree. She was exactly wrong. The tree had two stems, each about 36" diameter, so together they were 6' in diameter, but the two stems were a bit easier to handle. A 2 hour cleanup and they were REALLY glad to have my cant hook and my 28" saw. ;D
 Nothing ventured....
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 12, 2020, 08:27:27 AM
I was able to stop by after work last night to get the lay of the land as it were. Good looking tree. There's 3 main sections at least 15' long and not sure diameter but big enough to be worth the effort and small enough to be within my ability  8)  I'm no longer sure it was a barber chair split, it may have been a fork that when cut somehow parted. Doesn't really matter, the wood all looks good so hopefully in a few hours I'll be posting a pic of some new logs in my yard  ;D ;D  The homeowner told me another miller was looking at them and had said he'd be back last night or today to get them and the homeowner said first come first serve... hopefully I'll be the first  :) :)

One upside to the split, I already have one flat side  :D :D :D

Fired the Husky up last night, hadn't run it in a few months. I love fuel stablililzer and the ethanol free stuff, fired right up with only a couple more pulls than normal but nothing to worry about. Possibly dumb question but is it normal for a spark or two to come off the bar if the chain and bar are dry (ie clean and haven't had a chance for the bar oil to coat them yet?) It's a little above freezing here so I wonder if I need to be thinning the bar oil with kerosine or not?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 12, 2020, 06:50:16 PM
It took 5 hours or so, 3 trips (it was only a 10 min drive each way) but I have a whack of logs... or a whackette or whatever a baby whack of logs is  :D :D

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0398.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1581546116)

They are each 4 feet or longer and my guestimate is 300lbs to 500lbs each (I should really measure and find a density chart and get a more scientific answer than "I think it's..."). I figure 10 logs and I think it's reasonable to estimate 2 tons. We loaded them on a dolly then hauled them out by man power. Started out with me and my friend and the homeowner. Got the first load and on the way to my house called another friend and he was kind enough to help out. Good thing too as we would have only been able to do that first load as we were already pretty wiped out. It was probably a 100 foot run from where we cut to the truck pulling the dolly. Anyway, our wrists and inner forearms are toast. I doubt I could open a soda bottle at the moment. Actually tried arm wrestling my 13yo boy and barely beat him left handed and it was a stale mate right handed. 

There were two other trees that were down, wish I could have taken them as well but I think my friends would have mutinied if I'd been foolhardy enough to suggest such a thing. Oh well. I figure this will take me several days of milling to get through. 

I have to remember there's metal in these trees. I saw one eye bolt that I avoided but missed seeing another and avoided cutting it by about half an inch  :o :o Oh well, I guess what I don't pay for in cash I'll pay for in chains. Glad I have that metal detector  :) :)

I won't use names out of respect for peoples privacy but I have to give a shout out to the home owner. What a nice guy, super helpful. He is of the older generation but he outlifted me by a mile. Mad respect and appreciation to him. Hopefully he'll keep my phone number and if he drops any more trees will give me a call. I tried to do as little damage to his yard as I could. Asked for a tarp so I could try and catch as much of the sawdust as possible to reduce his clean up. I offered to cut the rest of the tree up for him but he declined as he has a small chainsaw of his own but did ask if I could cut up the two stumps into smaller pieces which I was happy to do. Glad I did as I decided to take most of the cookies from one of them as I think they'd make awesome end tables once they dry. There's some rot in the middles which would be fun to fill with colored epoxy.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0399.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1581550370)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0400.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1581550392)

Which brings up a couple questions. I have the cookies stacked and stickered, do they need to be strapped down? Since they are end grain I'm thinking they won't warp much but splitting as they shrink is a concern however I'm thinking the splits will just add more character when I finish them. I know we've talked about drying them in alcohol and other chemicals which I don't think I will do on these as they are quite large. If they turn out I figure I'll keep one or two for myself and give one each to the two fellows that helped me today. They've both been my go to guys when it comes to some of this crazy stuff I do so I'd like to give them something nice to say thanks. Fingers crossed these turn out. 

I still need to paint the ends of the logs but I'm fairly wiped out and some of the logs are really wet still and actually have sap (I'm guessing that's what it is) pooling at the bottom so I don't think the paint or wax would stick very well. I'll give them a day or two and then seal them. 

I'm now in the need for that simple solar kiln Doc Henderson posted about several pages back. Time to start pinching my pennies so I can buy the uv plastic and a few 4x4's.

I need to figure out a better way to get logs out than a dolly and brute force. Some sort of log arch wagon or something. Can't drag it on the ground as I'm frequently pulling from yards with nice lawns. Also need to get me that cant hook as I don't relish the idea of turning all these unaided. 

Ahh it's good to be back in the man glitter  8) 8) 8)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 12, 2020, 07:10:02 PM
Some sort of log arch

Make one of these only use wheel barrow tires (wider so less ruts?) if the ground is really soft.  I used the below to move 8x14 x 14' pine beams.  Just took it slow!

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/30640/Log_Arch_1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1364173771)

Ten to 12' of snow took a toll.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/30640/20190606_b.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559877582)

Rebuilt after snow bent the above:

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/30640/20190801_logarch.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564853907)

This gives more ground clearance with wheelbarrow tires.  The large bike tires roll pretty easy, though.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on February 12, 2020, 09:28:59 PM
AH, you are into it now! Whatever you call it, I call it a whack of work. Now you are adding cookie tables and epoxy jobs to your list. Yes, you have fallen down the rabbit hole.
Good on ya man!
EDIT: OH, and for moving those logs on lawns and such, take a look at that Log Rite Junior. It's a hand arch, would be just the ticket I think.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 13, 2020, 09:58:57 AM
ljohnsaw, I think you posted your device before! Thanks for reminding me about it though, I think I need to start pinching pennies for something like that or the logrite jr OG is talking about. 

OG, I'm not so sure I've fallen down so much as I dove right into that rabbit hole  ;) ;)

Whatever I decide to do, I have time. It's probably rather silly but I struggle to pay for things if I can build them, even when it makes more sense just to pay for it... I may have a mental illness there  ;D ;D DIYitis.. hey doc, is that an actual thing?

OG you're right, it is gonna be a whack of work and I wouldn't be surprised if I curse myself before I'm done but lets face it it's all part of the fun adventure that is CSM. In the end it might be easier and who knows maybe even cheaper to buy fine lumber but in my mind it's just not as much fun. For me it's about the learning and the doing and the growing of a skill that so many people don't have or even have an interest in learning. I think we all have that bug, it's why we build our own lofts or buy a bandsaw mill for thousands of dollars even though we may not actually save that much in the long run. It's about the adventure and the doing. I know, I'm preaching to the choir here but sometimes I have to remember why I do the crazy stuff I do. I'm just super blessed to have some friends that are willing to help out in my crazy adventures. As I grow older I'm realizing it's less about what I accumulate or the skills I gain and it's more about the friendships I get to forge along the way... ok enough philosophizing.  :P :P

I'm just super excited to have a decent supply of logs I can mill! I know last year I was wondering how I'd get logs, heh, now I'm wondering how I'll get them to the patio so I can mill them... good worries to have there  :)

Hopefully the weather will stay decent, ie no snow on the ground and I can mill a log or two next Wednesday. 

Brandon

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 13, 2020, 10:28:36 AM
It is nice to be surrounded by many with the same condition, makes us not seem so cray cray.  (crazy).  the idea that people are self sufficient seems to have diminished in value over the years.  My son has been taught plenty that he, at the time, feels is never going to be of use.  It is funny when his friends come to our house to fix something or do a project, and are astounded that either William and or his dad (the doc) are able to fix or build something and already have the tools and materials.  for it to be and illness, it has to negatively impact your daily living.  well... sounds like it is doing just the opposite!!! :) :) :)  Best regards!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 13, 2020, 11:53:44 AM
I think I need to start pinching pennies for something like that
 
Ah, no pinching necessary!  Can be had for free off of CL...
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on February 13, 2020, 05:17:46 PM
Maybe something like this could be built from a regular hand truck.  Think arborist cart or hand truck.  


(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/48503/image~92.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1581632145)
 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 13, 2020, 06:33:45 PM
SawyerTed, I was thinking of something similar with the second set of wheels that fold down to hold the weight while I pull.

OG suggested the logrite arch and as I was looking at their site I also saw the BTS Hauler. I'm pretty sure I could build something similar, maybe a hybrid of the two ideas. 

I'm chomping at the bit to build this stuff but gotta keep some perspective. I am still supposed to be working on the basement, I actually do want to get it done. If I hadn't gone to get the logs yesterday I'd have been working on the basement but I have to get free logs when they show up :)  It's also gonna take me a while to mill what I already have. As much as I think a bigger whack of logs would be awesome, probably better process what I have before I get too much more. There's other priorities as well and I won't bore y'all with the details. Keep the ideas coming though, that way when I do have the opportunity to build the stuff I'll have hopefully settled on the best possible option for my situation :)

Heh, the other elephant in the room... where do I stick all the beautiful lumber I've milled while it dries and then while I wait to have time to build stuff with it? Solved the problem of acquiring logs, now I have two new problems to replace the one! OG, weren't you commenting in your post how your list seems to keep growing even though you check stuff off?...wonder if it's the paper we write it on or the pencil  ??? ???

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 13, 2020, 06:43:16 PM
Paint the ends and stack them off the ground and they can wait all winter.  setting you goals higher than you can reach, may mean that you get more done as a result.  enjoy life, finish the basement, figure out what you want to do with your new logs, mill them when you get time.  sometimes my wife asks me why I did a certain thing, and sometimes the answer is, "I have been waiting 15 years to do that!"   :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 13, 2020, 07:27:45 PM
Already have them off the ground (theres some sacrificial logs under the two stacks.)  :) I thunked ahead I did ;)  I brought the paint in the house yesterday to let it warm up a bit so I can paint the ends. I found that the ends I didn't paint on the locust split more than the ones I did paint... nothing like an object lesson to really drive the point home eh ;) I think you're right though. I'll paint the ends and they'll keep just fine, maybe one day off I work on the basement and the next I do some milling.

I do have a rough idea what I want to try and do with them. I'm thinking a couple of Miller style chairs for the sanctuary (previously known as the man cave but the name was changed :D ) and then one of those cookie end tables between the chairs so the missus and I can play card games or I can read and meditate on things. Like you said, set your goals high  8)

Hopefully tonight I can spend half an hour hand planing that maple. My arms and shoulders are pretty sore from yesterday so it'll be interesting to see if I can effectively plane. If I can I think it'd be great exercise to work out the knots.

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 13, 2020, 07:58:46 PM
Wow Brandon what a flurry and good score on the whack  wood. I agree ...you and t h e wife need meditation chairs and a custom epoxied table in between.  Looks to me like there's a bench or two in those logs.   That pile will keep you out of trouble for a little while. Glad you had a good day.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 15, 2020, 09:10:00 AM
It's been a good week at my house. First, nice whack of logs, then I had a really good year end review and promotion/bonus at work  8) 8)... I'm not sure which one I'm more excited about, the logs or the work stuff  :) :)

@doc henderson (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41041) or anyone with experience drying elm. I've been doing some reading and it seems that elm has a nasty reputation for all sorts of movement shennanigans during drying. I plan to sticker every 12" and ratchet strap them as I have with the other wood I'm drying. I'm going to try and dry this elm outside (really don't want that barn smell in the house... to many easy shots there ;) ) using that easy solar kiln method doc posted a while back. Not sure how I'd manage it but if I can, will quarter sawing minimize the risk or warp, cupping, etc? Or do I just plain saw it and accept that no matter how hard you try there will always be some waste?

Should I cut 1/2" thicker and say 2" wider than the finished dimensions to have some wiggle room to straighten the boards? Any other tips, tricks, suggestions?

Maybe I'll stack it in the garage. The maple seems to have dried really well and fairly quick in there... just hate to use up the floor space and then there's the smell potential again. Hmmm what to do, what to do  ???

Not trying to overthink it, just trying to have a plan and be a bit deliberate in what I'm doing :) I am hoping to make some nice chairs and possibly other furniture in a year or two with this so I figure some thoughtful planning is in order.

Thanks all,

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 15, 2020, 09:47:28 AM
 8) 8) 8) Good for you Brandon, more money ...more money.... Even better is that you kind of like your job.  All my elm is stickered and stacked in the barn so I don't know but it seems like a good excuse to build a small solar kiln. :) 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 15, 2020, 04:10:39 PM
I think I posted 2 inch thick by 2 foot x 10 foot slabs, and I dried them down to 7% on my driveway.  the key is to not let it get re-wetted.  I do not have a ton of room for them inside due to there size.  I have given several away to friends and the finished applications turned out well.  If these are fairly free of branches, you will do ok.  The grain pattern that makes elm hard to split and dry, is the same grain that makes elm very interesting to look at and make it strong.  It may be harder to process with hand tools like a plane, but when it is dry if it gives you grief you find someone with a power planer and work out a deal.  as you show your work to friends and colleagues, the underground woodworkers will come out of the woodwork.  Your enthusiasm is contagious, and if you were closer, I would happily help you out.  sounds like you are close to balancing family, work and hobby.  God Bless.  
PS the smell is not that bad.  if you put them inside you will need fans,  I think the natural breeze outside makes sense.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 15, 2020, 04:26:23 PM
Nebraska, not quite ready to take the plunge yet on a solar kiln structure but if I keep this up for too much longer it wouldn't be hard to justify a small one. For now I'm going to try the uv plastic and stack of wood one. I'm really curious to see how well it'll do. I think since it's so dry and hot here it'll do just fine AND it has the advantage of folding up when not in use  8)

Doc, balancing everything is a daily challenge ;) some days I do better than others. The trick is not to let my enthusiasm and excitement overwhelm my perspective. Did you get that elm down to 7% mc just by air drying it on your driveway? It'd be cool to be closer to you and the other FF members! You may not be here in body but you and everyone else help me more than you'll ever know :)

I think that the more I think this through the more I think and think and think. At the end of the day I just need to give it a go and see what happens. I bet most of the wood will dry just fine if I stack and sticker it with ratchet straps and use the UV plastic to do that super simple solar kiln idea. 

Well I'm off to coat the ends with some paint to reduce checking until I can mill them. Hopefully I can start making some man glitter in the next few weeks or so! 

Stay safe everyone, 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: donbj on February 15, 2020, 04:36:42 PM
A quick tip on the end sealing that worked well for me. I went to the recycling place where people can drop off partial or unwanted cans of paint. I picked out some latex based cans that would barely move when shook and took them home and mixed them all together. Got a gallon of real thick water based sealer that didn't cost anything and worked well on some cedar slabs
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 15, 2020, 04:40:01 PM
 
(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/5A1C116B-D922-4C3D-96B6-741B2627934A.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1554425227)
 
this log was checked and somewhat dry when milled.  has made three great projects.  tested at 7 to 8% after a year initially under plastic and then tarps

Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 16, 2020, 04:52:15 PM
Donjb, that's an idea. I'll have to look into it. Would be a great way to save money and the environment... sort of :D

Doc, well if you can get to 7% MC with just tarps and air drying I should be able to do the same here in arid Utah. I'll pick some clear plastic up and try that solar kiln idea and let everyone know how it works.

I went to seal the logs yesterday and saw this one. It looks like 3 piths to me yet the log is round, is this common? Should make milling interesting, any suggestions?

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0401.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1581889799)

Now I've heard of pine blue staining and also know about Dutch Elm Disease... is this some sort of hybrid fungus, maybe grape elm disease?  ;) ;) ;)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0402.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1581889791)

Weather is supposed to be nice this week and wet the next so I'm thinking I'll try and mill a log or two this week. Fingers crossed I can :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on February 16, 2020, 08:34:51 PM
That purple disease must be widespread - this is the southeastern grape walnut version!

Builders supply houses sometimes have custom colors returned and they discount them heavily.   The Habitat Restore also might get weird colors donated.


(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/48503/139B93A1-E6D5-4BF9-A28A-F1BF0B40A214.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1550963932)
 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 16, 2020, 08:40:04 PM
I'm glad the free ash log I got today got coated with old chunky white latex. Those colors are kinda  brutal.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 16, 2020, 08:44:16 PM
you can get a temp and humidity sensor with a remote.  i have gotten acu-rite from Walmart and amazon for about 14 bucks.  fun to watch the humidity drop as the temp goes up ect.  
piths must of been 3 stems that grew together.  you could cut a series of cookies like a ct scan and see, but there goes your log.  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on February 16, 2020, 08:52:58 PM
My customer with the purple walnut log end seal uses different colors for different sawing dates and species. They are all recorded and he tracks moisture prior to moving the lumber into conditioned air storage.  He's used red, blue, orange, yellow and purple so far.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 20, 2020, 07:55:26 AM
The weather was pretty nice yesterday, high 30's. It's funny, I think that's cold and don't want to do anything then I read OG's posts about working in 10 degree or lower weather... I'm a wimp it would seem  ::)  But once I get going I really appreciate the cold weather as I tend to heat up and the cool keeps it comfortable  8)

So I dollied one of the logs over to the patio, put the ladder on it and started my cut

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0404.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582201622)

There was a slight incline and between that and the bark it was tough going. It takes time to cut then rotate the log and get the ladder set up for the next cut but I think going forward I'll consider it time well spent as the amount of effort I had to use to make the cuts had me wondering if I'd somehow dulled the chain instead of sharpened it  >:(

I did use the metal detector and it seemed to indicate something in a few spots so I took my axe and removed the bark in those areas but didn't find anything. After a couple cuts I did find this though 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0405.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582201936)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0406.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582201960)

I must be doing something right in my life as I've managed to avoid any major metal hits thus far, knock on wood. 

This wood is really pretty! I don't think I'll be using a stain when I finish it, just something to bring out the already amazing color it has. I'm super excited to work with it once it's dry!

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0407.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582202022)

About half way through I was getting rather worn out... I'm really out of shape  :-[  I have a co-worker that says a change is as good as a break so rather than sit down and take a break I decided to edge the boards. I bought a couple 5ah batteries for my circular saw, FANTASTIC! Well worth the investment in my opinion! I've discovered that my little 6 1/2" dia saw leaves a wee bit uncut if the board is 9/4. 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0409.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582202115)

After a short break I cut a few more boards. Again, the wood is just amazing! This log had some rot in it and this pic shows the beginning of where I started to get into it

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0408.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582202244)

I started edging again and the saw was struggling to get through the cut and I started wondering what was up so I pulled the blade and found...

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0410.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582202397)

I had a skip tooth blade!!!  :D :D :D  Works well in chainsaws I'm told, not so hot in a circular saw. So it was off to the store for a replacement. I decided to take another members advice and bought a Diablo and it works very well.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0411.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582202530)

I finished the log and edging in the time I had but I was pushing it on energy. I did set up one of those simple solar kilns but was too beat to take a picture, I'll get one in a bit. It's not very impressive with only a few boards in it but it'll be amazing once I have a few piles in it. 

I've realized I have a ton more wood than what I'll need for the Miller chairs I'm hoping to build so I'm thinking the rest will go for legs and cabinets and such for the reloading bench. I think the natural color of this Elm will go really nice with the maple bench top. 

On a side note, I've decided I want to build a platform to do the milling on as all this bending over and kneeling really takes a toll on me. A year ago I started to build a welding table but eventually reality set in and I realized it was too big for the space I have and so the 4" x 3/8" angle iron has been sitting in my garage begging to be used for something so I could have the space back. I think I'll weld a 5' by 2 or 3' top that is super stable and some removable loading ramps and a winch or something to get the logs on it. I figure 1.5' to 2' tall should suffice. As much as I'd love to deal with 3' dia logs the reality is I can't move them so I think 2' dia or slightly bigger is what I'll build for. 

Anyhow, it's good to be back to milling!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on February 20, 2020, 09:24:36 AM
"knock on wood",  now that is funny!!! :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 20, 2020, 09:53:16 AM
I had a skip tooth blade!!!

Been there, done that.  Amazing how a full set of teeth come in handy! smiley_old_guy
On a side note, I've decided I want to build a platform to do the milling on as all this bending over and kneeling really takes a toll on me.

What about a table that the top is adjustable.  Down lower to load and then one end raises up to 30 or so, so you really cut down hill making the best use of gravity?
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 21, 2020, 09:47:27 AM
ljohnsaw, I'd love an adjustable height table! But that costs money and this year's motto is paying off debt so gotta keep things cheap or in this case pretty much free. :)

I keep toying with different things and ideas and as is usual for me I start out simple, add things, it gets complicated and then I realize I'm not going to do that and I start over simple again... rinse and repeat.

I think I'm going to use the basic frame I already have, add some center supports and legs and an attachment for a hand operated winch to load the logs, ramp attachments and a few basic things and call it good. Most of this except for the winch I already have so it fits the overall plan of free  8)

I really wish I could make the table longer or able to be raised but for now 4' or so logs are likely all I'm going to work with so a 10' table isn't really needed. The adjustable part would be awesome but that'll have to come later. Maybe next year I can do a different table with nicer features :)

I'm also struggling with the time thing, do I take time to make this or just deal with the sore muscles and get the milling done, then there's all the other projects I should/want to be doing. it's all about balance  ::)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 21, 2020, 10:48:28 AM
I'd love an adjustable height table!
 
OK, how about this.  Make a frame (10' long? - Uni-strut would be pretty good here) and set the middle of it on the left end of the table.  Make that a pivot point.  With it tipped up(down?), you have a ramp that you pull the log up.  If not too heavy, stand the log up on end and flop it onto the frame.  Strap the log on temporarily.  Then, set an angle that works best for sawing down hill (or go all the way flat), attaching a brace from the high end down to the other legs.  You might have to drop in a cross piece to keep the log from sliding down.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 26, 2020, 07:26:35 PM
After a LOT of thought and dreaming I decided to make the basic table. I figure if I keep this up then maybe next year I'll build a nicer/bigger one but for now this should (hopefully) allow me to work with what I likely will get. A 10' table with all the trimmings would be nice but since I can physically only move 4' logs, it seems waste. Beside if I built the bigger one then I'd want to build the stuff so i could haul logs worthy of it  :D  It's a slippery slope. Anyhow, enough of my odd thought process, here's some pics

The table square was part of the welding table I was building and decided not to finish so that saved me a bunch of time this go around. Cut some legs 24" tall. I figure this will mean a 24" dia log plus 3" for the ladder thickness will have me just a hair over 4' off the ground which for my height is comfortable. 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0417.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582762232)

I'd love to tell you it came out perfectly level and square.. well none of y'all are here so I'll lie and tell you it came out perfectly square  ;) ;)  Nothing a shim or two won't fix or if it REALLY starts to bug me I can weld some leveler feet on it.

I spaced the ribs a bit off the bottom and ensured they were super accurate with my very precise and expensive pine leveling stick 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0418.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582762583)

I will need to round the corners a bit so I don't gouge myself but all in all it worked out well. I'm curious to see how my welds hold up. I'm not a welder, I just stick metal together and hope it holds.

I did an adjustable log dog thingler. I'm tired of wedging wood under the log and hoping it'll hold. I also have some pieces that are split into quarters already so I'm hoping with the log dog set up I can safely saw them into nice lumber. Hopefully this table will allow me to safely do stuff I couldn't before  8)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0419.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1582762768)

I still have some finishing to do but all in all I'm really happy with how it all went together and curious to see how it works. I have some metal left over I can add or make a few changes once I use it and see what works and what doesn't. 

It was also fun as a friend called up while I was doing this and asked if I could repair a part for him that he needed welded. It was cool to already have everything out so when he came over we put a couple welds on it and away he went  ;D

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on February 26, 2020, 09:59:58 PM
Looks good Brandon smiley_thumbsup.   You can make an extension for the table easily enough when the time comes. I'm waiting for the free old bicycle log arch to appear.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on February 27, 2020, 08:14:14 AM
Build things to make things easier for you. That is what I do.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 27, 2020, 11:15:21 AM
Looks good Brandon smiley_thumbsup.   You can make an extension for the table easily enough when the time comes. I'm waiting for the free old bicycle log arch to appear.
Thanks :) I'm still pondering the log arch thing. My only problem with using bicycle tires, free or otherwise, is how much weight can they hold?  I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot. 
I'm sure I'll build an arch or some sort of dolly, just not sure when. Until I do, I still have a whack of logs I can mill  8) 8)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on February 27, 2020, 12:39:08 PM
I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot.
I've EASILY had 500 pounds on mine - probably close to 800.  What does a green 8x12x14' pine weigh?  At 1,000 pounds, you probably would have some difficulty physically moving it.  If you are worried about ruts, use wheelbarrow tires for a lower ground psi with the fat tires.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on February 27, 2020, 02:35:28 PM
I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot.
I've EASILY had 500 pounds on mine - probably close to 800.  What does a green 8x12x14' pine weigh?  At 1,000 pounds, you probably would have some difficulty physically moving it.  If you are worried about ruts, use wheelbarrow tires for a lower ground psi with the fat tires.
Oky doky! I'll start watching the local ads for some free bikes :)  
I agree about the difficulty moving it at 1000 lbs but I prefer to over build and have me be the limiting factor. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on March 01, 2020, 09:53:04 AM
Het Brandon, I think I found a weight calculator for you when I was poking around last night. It's called "log Weight" and it just gives weight for a given length and diameter. It has a lot of species in there with the densities listed. I think it may be doing a straight volume calc and not figuring taper so you may have to mess around with picking SED, LED, or average diameter. It's very quick and simple, no recording, just gives you the weight. For BF and all the other goodies I still recommend SawLogClac.
 Keep cuttin'!
Tom
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on March 01, 2020, 11:05:33 AM
Maybe you can find one of those fat tire bikes for extra flotation.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 01, 2020, 11:08:08 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMnjF1O4eH0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMnjF1O4eH0)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on March 01, 2020, 11:13:39 AM
 :D When I saw it was Queen I thought for sure it was going to be

Queen: Bicycle Race (I Want to Ride My Bicycle) - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwvWtZl2ICY)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 01, 2020, 11:51:36 AM
Het Brandon, I think I found a weight calculator for you when I was poking around last night. It's called "log Weight" and it just gives weight for a given length and diameter. It has a lot of species in there with the densities listed. I think it may be doing a straight volume calc and not figuring taper so you may have to mess around with picking SED, LED, or average diameter. It's very quick and simple, no recording, just gives you the weight. For BF and all the other goodies I still recommend SawLogClac.
 Keep cuttin'!
Tom
OG, thanks for the info! 
I think I'll give the SawLogCalc app a look. I don't need the extra bells and whistles right now but for $2.99 if I buy the full thing it's a very reasonable price. For now I just wanted to know weights as we are using brute strength to move these logs and it's fun for bragging rights to say we moved a log that weighed xxx lbs  ;D  I am interested in the densities part though as at some point I need to figure out how to use my moisture meter a bit more accurately.
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 01, 2020, 12:02:53 PM
I had planned to do a bit more welding yesterday so this Wednesday I could try out the bench and mill a log or two. However, I found another log I could pick up. Ad said it was maple so I was excited... turned out to be more Siberian Elm which is awesome as well. Hopefully I can get some variety going forward but when you are looking for free stuff you can't be super choosy.

Home owner said the tree had been dropped about 3 months ago so I was wondering if the wood had deteriorated, not knowing how this stuff works. Figured it would be a good educational experience no matter how it went. 

Homeowner said it was a 16" dia by 24' long... turned out to be 20" dia at the base and over 24' long. Cut it into 4 6' long logs and loaded into two trucks

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0422.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583081822)

My friend and his son were kind enough to come help, couldn't have done it without them!

My poor truck didn't fair quite so well, the tail gate is a bit more rainbow shaped than flat... note to self, remove tailgate before loading logs in the future.

We were fortunate enough to be able to back right up to the logs which was super helpful.

When we got home another neighbor was kind enough to help us unload them.

I'd say I have enough logs for now but who would I be fooling  ;)  I'm sure I'll keep an eye out for more but for now I need to get these milled and drying. Also need to figure out where to store the wood once it's dried.

The major head scratcher I have at the moment is how am I going to load them on the bench. I think a ramp is a good idea but I only have a comealong and will hopefully have a couple cant hooks soon. For those of you who don't use a tractor or hydraulic loader to get logs on your mill decks, how are you doing it?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 01, 2020, 03:45:27 PM
Thanks to member Furby for the PM with suggestions on how to load the table!


One other question, is Elm saw dust ok to use on plants? Would like to give some to my neighbor for his raspberry bush and want to make sure it's not toxic like black walnut.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on March 01, 2020, 04:15:40 PM
Brandon, to lift your logs a chain hoist or come along on a tripod would be inexpensive enough.  The tripod if designed right could fold way for storage.

Raise the log, put your table under the log then lower into place. 

A tripod could also assist in loading logs on your truck.  Again if done correctly it should easily be portable.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on March 01, 2020, 05:37:12 PM
They don't make tailgates like they use too. I know the tail gate on the 95 dodge work truck weighs considerably more than the one on the 03 ford which weighs considerably more than the one on the 13 GMC my brother has.

That said a piece of stiff angle fastened across the top edge of the tail gate really helps to reinforce it.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on March 01, 2020, 07:34:49 PM
Log weight?
What about the one we have?
Extras, the one that starts out with Home Help, than Tool Box, than log weight.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 01, 2020, 08:36:19 PM
get some pipe to lay on the bed of your truck to roll logs forward.  could make a saw horse (wood or metal) to act as a pendulum to keep the weight off the edge of the bed or tail gait.  if you think in terms of pounds per square inch.  the thousand pound round log contacts about a square inch of surface as you rock it over onto the tail gait and or bed.  so 1,000 pounds/square inch.  a wheeled skid steer is about 22 pound per square inch and a tracked loader is about 4.  a 200 pound guy with feet/shoes 4 x 10 inches is about 5 pounds per square inch standing on one foot, and half that on both feet.  we loaded heavy blue spruce logs from camp into my truck but removed the tail gait and had 8 guys helping.  a sheet of osb could also help protect your bed.  i took my dad some dirt in 55 gallon barrels for low spots in his yard.  i rocked them on edge to roll them back, and nearly collapse the inner panel of my tail gait.  if you put a hand on a bed rail to jump out of the truck bed to the ground (I do not do this anymore)  you have to be careful not to bend the upper flat part.  Look @Magicman (https://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=10011) they do not make them like hey used to!   ;) :) 8)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: donbj on March 02, 2020, 12:24:12 AM
if you put a hand on a bed rail to jump out of the truck bed to the ground (I do not do this anymore)  you have to be careful not to bend the upper flat part.

Vehicles now a days if you scrape some paint off a body panel you will see the budweiser logo underneath the paint, that's how thin they are. You're very right have to be careful where you lean on or push.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 02, 2020, 09:49:44 AM
It snowed yesterday, only a few inches so I won't complain as I know some of y'all to the east have it much worse

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0425.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583159400)

If you look to the right of the whack of logs you can see the basic solar kiln I'm assembling. I tried to give it a bit of an overhang to keep the rain and snow out but it looks like I didn't do it far enough out. I'll have to remedy that but I'm not super worried as I don't think one snow storm will destroy the wood. 

I'm going to try parbuckling the logs onto the bench. I have a 5' or so aluminum motorcycle ramp I can use that has chains so I can attach it to the bench so it hopefully won't try to escape. I have a heavy duty 2" tie down strap I can use to do the pulling. I'm hoping with the longish ramp and the shortish height of the bench and physics that I only vaguely understand, I can pull it up the ramp with just my body  8)  I'll take pics and report back  ;D


My little pickup is a 94 Chev S-10 so it's not quite a pop can. I'm not surprised the tailgate rainbowed as it did, that was a lot of weight on a very small area. To be fair I think the in bed weight rating is only 500lbs or so... I won't admit to exceeding that many times... oh wait you guys have seen photographic proof that I have ;)  My point is that the truck has held up to far more than the manufacturers intended so I have no complaints. If I can get the tailgate straightened out a bit I like Hilltop366's idea of a bit of angle iron reinforcement. Or I may weld up a different tail gate for it. The current one is hard to open so if I can't figure out how to straighten it and fix the latch I'll just make a new one. Stay tuned for that adventure   :D

I've been doing a lot of reading on log cutting techniques, how the log is cut to get certain boards type of stuff. Up until now I've not paid much attention to pith location or heartwood to sapwood ratios but I think going forward I really want to start being more deliberate in what I'm doing. I may not be cutting veneer quality logs but part of the purpose of this adventure for me is to get fine lumber. So with that in mind a couple questions for you more seasoned sawyers. 

1. Is it acceptable to keep the pith in a board and if so does it need to be completely enclosed in the board? For example can I have a couple full width 4/4 boards that have part of the pith on the surface middle or is that just asking for cupping and or weakness issues?

2. Heartwood to Sapwood. I seem to remember reading that it's preferable to not have heartwood and sapwood in the same board but if you do you want it to be a fairly even ratio, is this correct? Is the orientation of the sapwood/heartwood boundary important?

I realize with CSM I'm a bit more limited with what I can do that a bandmill, though the table should increase my options a bit.

Any advise, rules of thumb, best practices etc that you can give me to think about as I'm milling would be much appreciated! I've read a few of the gov's publications on milling boards and how to improve quality but I think they assume I have a bit more basic knowledge than I do. They don't address the pith question or the heartwood/sapwood question. If you know of any good writeups on the subject please post the link and I'm happy to read/print and include in my ever growing binder on the subject :)

Also, is Elm sawdust ok to put on plant beds?

Thanks again all,

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 02, 2020, 10:05:12 AM
the pith is centered to hide the hole that goes through the log that is the center of the tree.  if you cut a thin board, the pith will peak in and out as you cut.  hard to center in a 4/4 board.  it will likely break in half along that pith.  most would just cut it out.  those boards would by definition be quarter sawn as well.  most wood does not shrink much in length but the exception is the juvenile wood just around the pith.  think the first 10 or 15 years of the tree.  I have not heard that elm is bad for plants.  It smells bad, so I would not want to eat asparagus the also was dressed with elm chips... WOW that would stink!!!   food3   smiley_smelly_skunk smiley_airfreshener :D 8) 8) 8) :o :o :o
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 02, 2020, 11:15:46 AM
Haha Doc, stinky in stinky out :D


Ok I figured that the pith wasn't the best part but wanted to verify that before I started cutting it out :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on March 02, 2020, 05:03:59 PM
The elm saw dust should be fine for about anything you want to use it for in the way of mulch or bedding.  The wood  on either side of the pith is good stuff  that whack of logs there will keep you busy for a while.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on March 02, 2020, 05:29:38 PM
I'm sure you will but I will remind to please be careful parbuckling logs or any other way you get them on your bench. Keep people away from the direction of any potentially runaway logs on the ramp or over running the top and falling on the other side.

Also watch out for when the log is nearing the top of the ramps that the ramps or the bench does not kick out or collapse, if the ramps were connected at the top and bottom of the table forming a triangle it would help from the table and ramps connection becoming a hinge.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: thecfarm on March 03, 2020, 05:54:05 AM
Tail gate smile is easy. Step son 4 wheeler almost fell out of the back of his truck,tail gate smiley it was. Came to me, and wanted it straight. He took it off and put it on the ground and I laid a 2x4 across it and handed him a sledge hammer. He asked what is this for? To hit the 2x4 with. A couple good hits and it was straight and would even latch and stayed closed. What more could someone ask for.  ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 03, 2020, 08:47:49 AM
thecfarm, I was thinking of something along those lines to fix the tail gate, glad to know it'll work! 

I really do love my truck but I'm a realist, it's a beater which I also love because when it gets a scratch or a ding or a smile it's not so horrible as it would be on a nice new vehicle. All the little dents and dings give it character :D

Hilltop366 thank you for the words of caution. I already intended to ensure no one would be in the path should the log and gravity decide to give the log a fighting chance ;)  While the logs I'm playing with are small compared to what most of you work with, they are still very heavy and could maim or even kill if things went wrong so I really do appreciate the reminders to use caution and stay safe.

For better or worse I'm often working alone when doing the milling, though tomorrow I may have a helper that is interested in how this whole process works. 99% of the time I'm VERY safety minded but I'll admit to some serious lapses in judgement a time or two and I have the scars to remind me of these lapses. So again, the reminders are a good thing. 

I built log stops into the bench, they are adjustable and removable so in the pics if you don't know what to look for they are easily missed. However seeing as how the bench only weighs 200lbs or so and the logs easily tip the scales at 400lbs for the smallest to 800lbs for the largest, if I'm able to parbuckle them up I'll have to be careful that I'm not going so fast when the log reaches the top and hits the stops that it doesn't flip the bench. 

As Hilltop pointed out it's possible for the bench to tip over while the logs are going up the ramp, I may try and figure out some way to connect the bottom of the ramp to the legs of the bench so it's in effect a wider bench which would help prevent it from tipping over. I have a bunch of metal cable from my failed attempts to be a stump puller  :D :D  Might be an excellent use for that. 

There's also control of the logs direction during loading. I may use some of that metal cable to make a wide U so in essence there's 2 cables spaced a ways apart controlling the logs direction as it goes up the ramp. The ramp I'm using is about 2 feet wide so as far as log stability goes I think it'll work great and it should be rated for more than the weight of the biggest log I have right now. 

I'm sure I'm missing some aspect that could go wrong but I think we've covered the most obvious ones. If anyone can think of others and wants to chime in feel free. It's better to address the risks or at the very least be aware of them than to have them pop up unexpectedly at the worst time. 

Thanks again all for your concern for my safety and also educating anyone who may read this thread! I'll take lots of pics tomorrow and let y'all know how it goes. I'm confident it'll go off without any injuries but will keep all the risks in mind and be on the lookout for them.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 03, 2020, 09:16:23 AM
The elm saw dust should be fine for about anything you want to use it for in the way of mulch or bedding.  The wood  on either side of the pith is good stuff  that whack of logs there will keep you busy for a while.
I don't think I'll run out of logs for a bit since on my best day I only was able to mill 2 logs :)  I'm hoping the bench will improve that a bit or at the very least will make it more pleasant. 
The next major question I need to figure out is if the simple solar kiln is able to bring the MC level below 10%... where do I store all this fine lumber?  :D :DWhat a great problem to have!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 03, 2020, 11:12:06 AM
I tried it with just using the strap in a single line pulling up the center of the log. This may have worked if I had a perfectly round log, the ramp was perfectly flat and I had the strap perfectly centered... since nothing is perfect I found this wasn't the way to go  ;)

Ultimately I pulled the hinges on the ramp and spread it as far apart as I could. Being that the table is not very long and because of the table legs the spread wasn't very great. I may try to address this later with some cutting and grinding.

Ultimately I doubled the strap unto a U shape and pulled the log up. It was not easy and I am not sure I could do the two bigger ones on my own as I nearly didn't get this one. Hopefully the shorter 4' logs I can do a bit easier as they are lighter, otherwise I will have to do one of those bicycle tire log arches much sooner than I was planning or stop milling... yeah like that'll happen  :D :D :D :D

Anyhow, here's a pic, I'm worn out and grateful to be about ready to clock into work and will be brainstorming ideas on how to the loading going forward. 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0427.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583251548)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on March 03, 2020, 04:12:26 PM
On the back side in your picture, mound a long rod (like 1" water pipe inside 1.5" pipe "bearings" welded to the table at each end).  Take up the slack and wrap the nylon strap once or twice around it with the end buried under the strap.  That friction should keep the strap from slipping.  With a crank handle on the rod, crank away.  With the small diameter rod and a 18" or so crank, it should give you enough mechanical advantage to get it up the ramp.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on March 03, 2020, 09:19:21 PM
Hmm looks its  still winter there.  How about a basic electric winch or boat trailer winch attached to the cement behind the table? Pulling on the center of a pipe behind the log tied into the nylon.  Just put it far enough over to have enough cable to roll the log up.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 04, 2020, 07:38:35 AM
The bench isn't going to stay where it is. Once the ground dries out in a few months I plan to move the bench to the wood area so I'm not making a mess on the patio so much. 

I may do an electric winch or ljohnsaws idea, both being removable in some way. I'm also toying with a small log arch that can be moved by one or two people depending on log size. I'm thinking if I put a removable extension on the log arch that goes say 18" out I can use that to lift the log the 2 feet up on the table. I'm trying to really think this through instead of my usual impulsive rush. I have a bit of time. I guess worse case scenario I keep doing it the way I did and I grow some muscles  ;D ;D

Nebraska, the weather here is a bit strange. One day it's snowing hard the next day it's 50 degrees. This time of year Mother Nature has some serious mood swings. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 04, 2020, 10:56:04 PM
The bench works quite well for milling.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0429.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583380317)

The log dog was awesome! I tried to center the pith checking in a 8/4 board but it didn't work out the way I hoped, oh well. I have more logs to practice with :D

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0428.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583380424)

I also welded up a cant hook that works very well!  It's still pretty rough, needs some clean up grinding and shaping but it rolled the log with ease

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0430.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583380476)

The boards are starting to pile up and fill out the little simple solar kiln :)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0432.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583380517)

All in all a good day. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 05, 2020, 07:59:36 AM
looks like you are finding ways to make things easier.  that adds to the enjoyment.  not the easier part but journey and experience.  you will never forget the lessons learned, and thanks for sharing with us.  I have a nephew who is now an engineer.  he lived with us and worked for me part time around the home.  He was a little strong headed, graduated HS early, ect.  He did not want to drive my little dump truck, so we took baby steps and he rode with me to the dump, I rode with him to the dump. I told him all good engineers know how to drive a dump truck.  he said no they don't.  I said yes they do...you get the idea.  so the day came when the truck was loaded and ready to go.  he got home from college to work.  I told him about the truck.  he said I am not really comfortable driving it to the dump.  he was sincere.  I told him I appreciated his honesty ect., and that I had spent time and was paying him the whole time I trained him to drive and operate the old 1976 single axle ford Allison automatic state dump truck.  so I listened for a few rounds and then told him to get in the truck and take it to the dump.  he did and all was fine.  and he is a good engineer, and driving the old truck did not hurt him one bit!  I think he enjoyed driving the old uncle crazy, more!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on March 05, 2020, 08:06:11 AM
You are on a roll man! And making great headway!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on March 05, 2020, 08:24:09 AM
That cut on that log looks really good to me Brandon...  I think next winter you will have lots of projects with that wood when it is dry. I figured a cant hook would show up sooner or later,  you need one for handling that stuff. Looks like you had a great day 8).
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on March 05, 2020, 09:40:41 AM
 smiley_thumbsup

Here is one CSM idea that I don't think I would have ever came up with.

 езня бензопилой в Красногорске :) - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpYzFg88mUg)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 05, 2020, 03:02:54 PM
looks like you are finding ways to make things easier.  that adds to the enjoyment.  not the easier part but journey and experience.  you will never forget the lessons learned, and thanks for sharing with us.  I have a nephew who is now an engineer.  he lived with us and worked for me part time around the home.  He was a little strong headed, graduated HS early, ect.  He did not want to drive my little dump truck, so we took baby steps and he rode with me to the dump, I rode with him to the dump. I told him all good engineers know how to drive a dump truck.  he said no they don't.  I said yes they do...you get the idea.  so the day came when the truck was loaded and ready to go.  he got home from college to work.  I told him about the truck.  he said I am not really comfortable driving it to the dump.  he was sincere.  I told him I appreciated his honesty ect., and that I had spent time and was paying him the whole time I trained him to drive and operate the old 1976 single axle ford Allison automatic state dump truck.  so I listened for a few rounds and then told him to get in the truck and take it to the dump.  he did and all was fine.  and he is a good engineer, and driving the old truck did not hurt him one bit!  I think he enjoyed driving the old uncle crazy, more!
You're welcome Doc, thanks for spending your time reading my ramblings and commenting :)
Heh, I think nearly all young'uns enjoy driving their elders crazy. I know I did things that would annoy my parents just because I could :D
I'm grateful I have a somewhat mechanical/engineery sort of mindset and some decent skills to be able to do what I do. I wouldn't be able to do a lot of what I do if I had to pay others to do it for me. Fortunately I also find it fun more often than not :)
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 05, 2020, 03:05:30 PM
You are on a roll man! And making great headway!
I have to keep up with you and all your progress!  8) 8)
After I was done I actually took 20 mins or so to relax and just enjoy the successes and progress I'd made which is pretty out of character for me. I think I need to make a habit of doing that, just sit for a few minutes and list what went right that day and just enjoy that it went right :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 05, 2020, 03:12:58 PM
That cut on that log looks really good to me Brandon...  I think next winter you will have lots of projects with that wood when it is dry. I figured a cant hook would show up sooner or later,  you need one for handling that stuff. Looks like you had a great day 8).
This elm is really pretty!  I'm excited for when it dries and I can work with it.
Yeah the cant hook was long overdue in my ever expanding milling tool set. I'll probably make a couple different handle lengths since I have the materials and the first one went together so well. Hopefully it wasn't beginners luck  ;D
A friend came over to help as he was interested in how milling works. I told him I'd show him what I know, not sure if it's what works or not ;)  I think he may show up a bit as time goes on. He was talking about making an epoxy river table and even had a few cool ideas I hadn't seen or thought of on how to do it and it was just fun to have good company. 
My wife has requested a bench for the dining area which is why I milled 8/4 slabs. I figure those aught to be plenty sturdy for a 5'ish bench top. I may also use a bunch of it for the reloading bench cabinets. I am also thinking of a bed frame/headboard and night stands. I guess I figured out where all this wood is going to go when it's dry  8) 8)
All in all yesterday was a really nice day :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 05, 2020, 03:15:18 PM
Stopped and picked up a few more ratchet straps and a small hand winch. I think I've figured out how to parbuckle with a single winch and the materials I have on hand. With luck I'll be posting a pick of my back saving parbuckling setup soon :D

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 06, 2020, 08:14:26 AM
I've been feeling like I don't have enough time the last little while, feels like all I do is go to work and go to sleep. I know, it's the working mans complaint ;) I've been thinking about the solution to my problem... quit my job!!!! Ok, reality intruding now, that ain't happening  ;D  Seriously though, there's a couple hours between when I get home and when I go to bed. More often than not I'm rather mentally worn out so I don't really accomplish much during that time. I've noticed Old GreenHorn seems to get a LOT done after he gets home from work, so a little positive peer pressure finally set in and I came home last night and welded the thingamajigger (yes that's a very technical term ;)) for the winch

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0433.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583499847)

I'm amazed at how well things are going together for me lately. The bench went together smoothly and so far no indication that the welds aren't going to hold. The cant hook isn't perfect but dang it went together quick and seems like it'll hold up to anything I'm likely to encounter in the forseeable future and this little winch stand went together quite nicely. I'm not trying to brag, I'm just not used to things going quite so well so a big thanks to the Big Guy upstairs for the blessings, a huge thanks to all my friends and mentors here on the forum for the ideas and encouragement and I guess a thank you to all the projects that didn't go quite to plan for teaching me what doesn't work and also the perspective to be thankful for when things do :)

I still need to bring the bench into the garage and weld a slot for the winch. I also need to angle the legs on one side so the logs will clear then when they are coming up as well as the ribs. Also need to weld attachment points for the steel cable I'm planning to use to parbuckle the logs with. 

It's funny, a few days ago I felt like I had too much lumber and wasn't sure what I'd do with it. Now that I'm thinking of making a bed frame and other things I realize I may not have enough  :D :D :D  I also need to get some 8' logs for the sides of the bed frame, though as I type this I may have thought of a way to do it with shorter pieces  :P  Oh well, lots of time to figure it all out. 

Hope y'all have a nice and safe day!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 06, 2020, 09:23:16 AM
the art of balancing time and money is the key to many things.  time with family and a little for ourselves.  money to do the things we want to do, and things we need.  At first I thought you were welding something for "your wife"  and I was glad to realize it was for "your bench".   :o :o :o  you know the thingamajigger!   :D :D :D
it all looks great!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 06, 2020, 11:15:56 AM
the art of balancing time and money is the key to many things.  time with family and a little for ourselves.  money to do the things we want to do, and things we need.  At first I thought you were welding something for "your wife"  and I was glad to realize it was for "your bench".   :o :o :o  you know the thingamajigger!   :D :D :D
it all looks great!
I'm still struggling to find that balance  :)
Uhh I'm going to let you win the Thingamajigger joke :D:D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: trimguy on March 06, 2020, 07:47:47 PM
Glad things are working out. When they do , you seem to get a " little push " to help keep going. :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: donbj on March 06, 2020, 09:11:24 PM
I'm just not used to things going quite so well so a big thanks to the Big Guy upstairs for the blessings


That's the key! Don't be too hard on yourself regarding things. It's when we look back at things we realize these things in a better perspective. In the heat of the moment not so much sometimes.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 07, 2020, 07:49:20 AM
Glad things are working out. When they do , you seem to get a " little push " to help keep going. :)
That is the truth!
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 07, 2020, 07:50:49 AM
I'm just not used to things going quite so well so a big thanks to the Big Guy upstairs for the blessings


That's the key! Don't be too hard on yourself regarding things. It's when we look back at things we realize these things in a better perspective. In the heat of the moment not so much sometimes.
This is a lesson I seem to have to revisit on a frequent basis  :P  In the end something is really only a failure if we fail to learn something from it.
Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 09, 2020, 09:22:02 AM
Welded the center receiver for the winch pole and tried it out. SOOOOO much easier than trying to parbuckle using only my own strength!

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0434.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583759178)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0435.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1583759170)

I need to shorten the steel rope as the winch hook is fully retracted before the log is on the bench. This go around I used the cant hook to rotate it up the rest of the way but I don't think that's something I want to make a habit of. I seriously doubt it would ever be the case BUT in the event of a catastrophic equipment malfunction (or the highly more likely I get complacent and don't set things correctly) and the log suddenly lets loose and goes back down the ramp, I don't want to be in the way with or without a cant hook. So shortening the steel rope is in order. No big deal, all part of the fun of developing my own process  8)  I'm just thrilled with how well this is all going and how much easier this makes the milling process on my body. 

Even getting the log to the ramps is a bit easier. Before I was using a regular dolly and it was rather tiring but now I just roll it along using the cant hook. 

This hobby is dangerous to the pocket book and the free time allotment :D  I keep thinking of things I want to build or do. I'm thinking I'll weld a couple extensions onto the table and make it closer to 8' in total length for a couple reasons. One I already have the angle iron and would like to get it out of my garage as I'd like the space back. Two, I'm thinking I want to put some vertical riser type things to hold the ladder so I can do some milling on logs or log sections that the ladder won't easily sit on firmly. In the end I'm trying to reinvent the bandsaw mill and that may be where I ultimately end up but for now I'm trying to maximize the capacity of what I have on hand. 

I'm also dreaming up the trailer I'm hoping I can build next year and some wheeled thingies I can use to help get logs out of peoples yards with much less effort than is required by my current methods. Then there's the drying and storage of milled lumber, disposal of sawdust and off cuts. Not sure where this path will ultimately lead but I'm sure having a lot of fun traveling it  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on March 09, 2020, 09:41:08 AM
That is looking mighty slick! Nice and neat. You should paint up the frame in party colors when you are done and make a nice wood top so it can be used as a patio table when you are not milling. Might make the wife happier. Maybe that purple log paint color? ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on March 09, 2020, 10:01:20 AM
Looks good, I think you could go wth the purple  frame and a  slab top with a set of  matching Adirondack chairs  for relaxing on the patio.  ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Old Greenhorn on March 09, 2020, 10:14:28 AM
BTW, thanks for asking the question that drove me to find the free log weight app for you. I have it in my phone and am finding it very handy for quick log weights as I try to figure out what I can safely get on the trailer next weekend for each trip. It has no recording features or logging, just straight and simple weights. Very fast to bounce around with different sizes and species. I was going to delete it from my phone after I tried it before recommending it, but now I am going to keep it because it is so simple and handy.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on March 09, 2020, 10:46:03 AM
so now you are a woodworker and a smart phone fan!!! :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on March 09, 2020, 04:52:59 PM
So shortening the steel rope is in order.
 
Have a couple of 2x4 or 4x4s ready when you have it going up the ramp.  Use them through the rungs to provide a stop for the log.  Then, take the hooks you have on your V-cable and hook them to the back side angle iron to take up some slack.  Under the back side and hook on the top edge.  If you need to take up more, go back to the front and hook there.  Sometimes you will want the long cable so don't shorten it.  For minor slack take up, you can just do one side.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 09, 2020, 05:34:46 PM
ljohnsaw great ideas! 


A purple milling bench? Well I guess it'd match the kids play house. I'm seeing some connection between the land of make believe and man glitter ;)


Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 20, 2020, 04:13:58 PM
Well not a whole lot of milling going on sadly :(

With the virus I've been transitioned to working from home. I'm grateful to work for a good company that has given me this option. My wife is also being transitioned home so with all this change and the little earthquake we had a few days ago things are a bit nuts. No one was hurt in the earthquake, a few cans fell off the shelf was it, just a little nerve jangler.

So my focus has been put back on getting the basement moving along at a faster clip. Nearly done with the one room, another coat of mud and hopefully a little light sanding and paint and it's done. Then on to the wife's office which has now been bumped up to urgent on the needs scale. Then the room with a hundred names (formerly the man cave, the sanctuary, the ...)  

Luckily the weather has been wet so I'm not quite as inclined to try and shirk my responsibilities :D

Aside from a lot of great blessings one thing happened the other day that I thought was cool. I've been posting a bit of what I'm doing on Facebook. I don't really like social media and only started the page back up to spread word of what I was doing in the hopes of sourcing more tree trunks. That's been a no go so far but one of my co-workers that follows me stopped me to ask what I'm doing with all the lumber I'm milling. Seems he has a table with metal legs and a tile top that he was going to throw away but got thinking he'd try and refinish it an buy the wood for the top from me  8) 8)  So I'll have to do a good job of milling a few logs and mark them for bookending. Not sure it'll pan out or that any of the wood I've milled will be good for more than designer firewood but I thought it was way cool however it pans out :)

Anyhow, hope everyone else is doing well in these crazy times! Remember, Man Glitter is a cure for many things!!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on March 20, 2020, 10:23:54 PM
Glad you can work from home and came through the earthquake with minimal issues. Stay safe. I just had a trailer load of ash given to me by one of my clients after we got done with a calving this evening. five logs total, one good 20 in ,one fair, and three short 12 in firewood logs. Pretty sure more will turn up for you.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on March 21, 2020, 07:57:31 AM
Thanks! All in all my family is super blessed! It's inconvenient and frustrating but we're all in good health so I have NO room to complain... won't stop me though ;)

Nice on the ash! I'd like to try milling some ash. I'd love to mill some Beech! I think it's a really underappreciated wood.

Aside from some deep seated need to accumulate stuff I'm fine on logs. If I'm honest I have all I can handle at the moment. Once I'm done milling the dozen or so I have I'll have to figure out where to store them while they dry, where to store them once they're dry, what to build out of them etc. All good problems to have :)  So far it seems I'm able to find logs when I really need them and I can't see any reason that'll change. People are always planting trees, trees are always growing and they are always being cut down so the supply chain seems healthy. 

Hope you and your family and doing well in all this crazy!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 11, 2020, 02:23:44 PM
So finally something solidly milling related  8)

Cleared a spot in the wood pile for the milling bench

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0489.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586627678)

Put the bench in its new home and hooked up the aluminum ramps. Decided to load the biggest log I have. Was tricky to get up but managed to get it on the bench and then made the mistake of ignoring the voice that told me to put the log dog in on the ramp side so the log couldn't roll off while I tried to position it the way I wanted it.... fortunately no foolish people were injured in the making of this tale but one aluminum ramp was destroyed  >:(

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0490.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586627736)

So that was an unexpected learning lesson. I spent a few minutes feeling sorry for myself then asked "what can I do with what I have on hand?" 

Finally settled on what was going to be the top of the welding bench, welded some angle iron on as hangers and set it in place. It's almost like it was originally intended for this! Woohoo. Super sturdy and I get the wall space in the garage back so BONUS!!

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0491.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586628745)

Got the log up, took the first cut and then rotated for the next

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0493.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586628773)

The home made cant hook is AMAZING! Couldn't do this stuff without it! I cut three sides and proceeded to take boards off two of them as the log was pretty tapered and I had read about this process so figured I'd give it a whirl. All in all it worked pretty well for nice boards though I have some taper in my boards but I've narrowed that down to operator error.  :P

There was nice color in these boards and some speckling that I guess was from branches that never grew??? 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0494.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586629130)

So the cant remaining is a funny wedge shape. With the pith cracking and other defects I'm not sure it's worth taking wide boards from and with the set up time and the way I have to secure the ladder to it I'm not sure it's worth taking narrow boards... this is one of those times where I regret not having a bandsaw mill *shrug* oh well. It may end up as some 3x3's to make a shoddy work bench for when I'm milling or it may just end up as designer firewood. One cool thing about having a designated milling area is I don't have to clean up as much and can leave stuff a few days while I think :)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0495.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1586629158)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JRWoodchuck on April 11, 2020, 11:46:39 PM
If you weld some chunks of angle iron upside down on your new ramps it will act as little holders while your rolling your logs up
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 12, 2020, 10:41:44 AM
If you weld some chunks of angle iron upside down on your new ramps it will act as little holders while your rolling your logs up
Great minds think alike! That's exactly what I did :) Works great!
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: SawyerTed on April 12, 2020, 11:47:34 AM
That wedge shape might make some tapered legs.  You could use a 2x8 or similar in place if the ladder for your CSM or stand the wedge up and rip the pith out of it!   :D ;D :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on April 12, 2020, 12:59:27 PM
Looks like somebody's  future outdoor rustic patio bench to me. Bet you could conjure up some removable leveling feet for that ladder...
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 12, 2020, 05:05:14 PM
That wedge shape might make some tapered legs.  You could use a 2x8 or similar in place if the ladder for your CSM or stand the wedge up and rip the pith out of it!   :D ;D :D
Hmmm I had a nebulous idea of using it for legs for a throw together outdoor table to hold my milling stuff... but your post made me wonder about maybe legs for the bench for the kitchen  8)  I'll have to try and rip some 2" thick cuts off in the next day or two after work and hope they dry well :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 12, 2020, 05:07:04 PM
Looks like somebody's  future outdoor rustic patio bench to me. Bet you could conjure up some removable leveling feet for that ladder...
I need to do some rustic patio furniture at some point. 
Not sure I'm following the reason for removable leveling feet for the ladder?
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 27, 2020, 09:55:45 AM
Where does the time go? Life is busy lately so not as much milling as I'd like. Funny thing is some of my logs are so bored waiting for me they've started sprouting little buds :D

Anyhow. I welded up a ramp to help load logs into the trucks as lifting 500lbs+ just isn't my cup of tea.  My nephew is taking welding in high school so I asked him to come give me a hand and glad I did. He is easily my equal in welding (which isn't hard as I'm not the greatest welder, no slight to his skills intended.)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0508.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1587995007)

Here's the finished product

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0520.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1587995049)

Here it is loading a couple logs Saturday

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0523_28229.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1587994999)

It worked very well but needs a few adjustments/additions. It takes work to use but we were much less sore and exhausted loading those two logs than we have been in the past. I may weld a couple posts for a small removable log arch to facilitate getting the log onto the ramp so we don't have to brute force it on. The goal for this contraption was to utilize metal I had already. I'm seriously hoping to buy and modify a trailer next year so I can parbuckle logs onto it with a nice electric winch. 

I was a bit bummed that the wood was more siberian elm, I have a lot already and would like to get something different, maple or oak or some more of that locust would be awesome! But I have no room to complain as I am getting the wood for free. The cool thing is the guy doing the felling appears to be a small time tree guy and he offered to keep my number and let me know if/when he comes across other logs I'd be interested in. Kindness is rewarded it would seem. When we arrived he was having trouble with his chainsaw and after trying to help him troubleshoot it for a bit with no luck I let him use my little Poulan. I figure he's giving me free logs, I can let him use my saw real quick to get them down. Then we helped him cut it up and stack it once it was on the ground. Hopefully it'll turn into a contact that results in a few nice logs here and there.  8)

Hopefully I can mill a few more logs in the next couple weeks. I've nearly met the capacity of the little simple solar kiln so I think a second and probably third are in the near future :)  Fingers crossed, by the time the snow flies again I'll have a respectable stack of nice lumber I can build fine(ish ;) ) furniture with.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on April 27, 2020, 10:04:29 AM
looking good.  do not underestimate the beauty of Elm.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on April 27, 2020, 10:28:38 AM
here is an Elm that has sat for 5 years waiting.  It has started row crops!   :D


(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/20B34023-75C7-41B9-8ECC-368433E3FE46.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1587997700)
 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 27, 2020, 01:15:07 PM
looking good.  do not underestimate the beauty of Elm.
Not discounting it at all :) Very pretty wood. I will admit to maybe a bit of wood peer pressure as everyone talks about maple this, oak that, etc. I guess I'll have to get over that eh :D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on April 30, 2020, 08:32:08 AM
The other day on my lunch break rather than sit around or the healthy alternative of going for a walk, I decided to line up some of the logs for easy loading onto the bench. It takes some creative phenagling but I got it done  8)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0525.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1588249287)

So yesterday I hit the milling hard and was rewarded with 10 6 foot boards 1.5" thick. I'm not sure how well some of them will do as there were some good sized branches coming off so the grain is extra squirrely but I am excited to see how they dry for the educational value of it AND if they dry well there's some really pretty grain structure that I may use to make the doors for my reloading bench as it's the only way I can think of to display them. I didn't get a picture of it but the heartwood had kind of a greenish cast to it which I thought was cool for the variety of it all. I'm feeling the effects of the long hours in the sun and the standing and pushing the milling jig but it's the kind of stiff soreness that comes from a job well done and I'm happy to sit in front of my computer and work in a cool basement today  ;D

The simple kiln is nearing capacity  8)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0527.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1588249565)


The stack of yesterdays boards  :)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0528.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1588249277)

The husky is leaking gas into the carb space and the air filter whenever I tip it on its side to fuel it up. Doesn't seem to leak when the fuel cap is on but the moment I open the cap it starts leaking, can't be sure but I'd guess a tablespoon or more of gas each time. It's also running and idling a bit rough and after I fuel up I have to wait a bit for the gas to evaporate before it'll start as I'm guessing that extra gas is playing havoc with the fuel air mixture. I'm hoping it's something simple like the fuel line opening isn't plugged quite right or maybe the carb just needs a rebuild kit. I have 3 more boards to get tonight if I have the energy and then I need to figure this leak out before it gets even worse. If anyone has had a similar leak and wants to offer sources to check I'd be much appreciative  :P

Hope everyone is doing well!

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on April 30, 2020, 09:08:29 AM
Make sure it's not leaking out of a crack in the fuel line right where it comes of of the tank, that can cause an air leak leaning out the fuel mix and well, every cylinder I've burnt up in a saw has been from an air leak issue leaning them out. Two happened with my  attempts at chainsawmilling/noodling long logs, one fuel line, one base gasket on the carb. Looks good. Going to have to make a dried  slab show room on your garage wall. 8)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 02, 2020, 01:38:00 PM
Nebraska, thanks for the starting point on the gas leak, I'll look into it as I'd imagine air leaking through the line would allow it to drain into the carb then out. 

I'm seriously not sure where I'm going to put all the wood once it's dry and I'm waiting for the time to use it but it's a problem for tomorrow so I'll worry about it then ;)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 11, 2020, 11:22:40 AM
I puttered around with the chainsaw checking some of the fuel feed lines for cracks. The line leading from the carb to the engine appears to be very thin in one area and I'm wondering if it's got a small air leak, I'll have to order a replacement. After playing with the lines I had my wife fill the fuel tank while I watched the carb area to see if I could locate the leak.... and no leak  ???  So I figured maybe moving the tubes resolved it. Went to mill and the leak reappeared  ::) . I'm not going to fret over it too much. The work around at the moment is to leave the air filter and cover off for a few minutes after refueling to allow the excess fuel to evaporate then she starts right up. I've ordered a new fuel line and filter as it was one of the lines I moved when it appeared it was fixed. I'll replace that, if the problem isn't resolved I'll replace the line going from the carb to the engine (I'm guessing it's some sort of breather or suction tube or something, if it's relevant I'll look the part number up and post it in case it's helpful to anyone else.) If those two things don't fix it I'm thinking the next step is a carb rebuild as the thought occured to me that maybe somehow the carb is pumping too much gas??? but as I type that I don't think that could be as it would have to be while the engine is running and that'd cause the engine to flood I would think. Oh well, I'll limp along until I get it worked out. I'm happy I can mill while I puzzle the fix out.

Not a ton of interesting stuff going on. I did finally build a shelving unit for the chainsaws and other equipment to get it off the garage floor. I grew tired of tripping over it and wondering what was going to be badly damaged first, me or the saws. Have one of the 6' logs on the bench and one more queued up to be milled then it's on to the stash of 4 footers. I used to try and vary the cut thicknesses to reduce planing waste but I've now decided that it takes a lot of time to adjust cutting depths AND with a 3/8" saw kerf one way or another a lot of the log ends up as sawdust whether by chainsaw or planer so I may as well make it easier on myself and try to just cut one thickness per log or milling session. It also helps with the stacking aspect as well, at least with my process (process, what a nice way to term the random mess I make ;) )

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on May 11, 2020, 02:20:23 PM
Same thickness will make you much more efficient with your set up, I would think. I also don't think you'll run out of logs to mill in the near future. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 11, 2020, 07:57:55 PM
I'm still trying to figure out what my niche is in this hobby. I figure I'll cut for 3/4, 6/4 and 8/4 boards (I size at least 1/4" over the target size, lately I'm doing 3/8 to allow for planing, shrinking, warp, etc.) I look at a log then pick whatever size I think would get the best boards from it. I don't have specific plans on anything yet and I figure the above sizes will allow for a lot of flexibility in building. 

I can't speak for other CSM jigs but mine takes at least 5 mins to adjust, sometimes longer. Since the builder neglected to include user instructions  ;D I'm learning as I go. I'm still figuring out the best way to adjust, change chains, etc, but that's part of the fun of the adventure.  8)

I'm not too worried about running out of logs any time soon. So far the best I've managed is 2 logs in one day. My current plan is to mill until the weather starts getting warm enough it's miserable then focus on some other important projects. Hopefully by fall I'll have some nice wood to build with :) And I think I have a slight illness, I keep telling myself I have enough logs and no room for more yet I keep surfing the local ads and looking for more ::) ::)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on May 11, 2020, 11:08:06 PM
Too many logs ...never. You can always a couple more. ;)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 12, 2020, 09:27:40 AM
Too many logs ...never. You can always a couple more. ;)
This will likely be on my tombstone :D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 12, 2020, 09:34:59 AM
I milled the last three boards off of one of the 6 foot logs. On one of the last cuts I started smelling something odd and thought it smelled like charred wood. I looked at the board but saw no charr marks so I figured one of my neighbors must be smoking some meat or something. I walked around the bench a few minutes later and found a quarter sized black spot of smoldering sawdust. I have the spark screen in the muffler of my chainsaw, as near as I can tell I didn't hit any metal, sure wish I knew what happened. In any event I think my new SOP will be a walk around the bench every couple boards to make sure there's no fire starting or other risks. I don't think a fire could reach any of the houses, the lawns are green and short, but I'd sure hate to be wrong. I think I'd better get a fire extinguisher as well just to be on the safe side. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on May 12, 2020, 09:39:19 AM
good thoughts about safety.  I like the saying, (with a German accent)! "too soon olt, too late smart.  Might not be on a stone, but poss. carved into a 2 inch thick slab of elm, and in you own back yard!!!   :D  sounds like your family supports your addiction.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on May 12, 2020, 09:41:27 AM
any little bit of carbon could smolder in some saw dust.  I think with a gas leak, it becomes potentially more life threatening.  (gas on clothing with an ignition source).    good luck and be safe.  none of the stuff we do everyday is without risk.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 12, 2020, 04:31:26 PM
any little bit of carbon could smolder in some saw dust.  I think with a gas leak, it becomes potentially more life threatening.  (gas on clothing with an ignition source).    good luck and be safe.  none of the stuff we do everyday is without risk.
Doc thanks for pointing this out, I totally missed this risk!
I'm assuming the carbon is a routine risk with chainsaws, hence the spark screen? I'm asking as I wonder if it could be an indicator of excessive carbon build up in the cylinder?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on May 12, 2020, 08:33:56 PM
I do not think so, but others may chime in, as this is an assumption on my part.  just a reminder that you are holding/standing next to a machine that explodes gas in a chamber to motivate a system that turns a chain and cuts through a large tree.  do not mean to be dramatic, but with a continued gas leak, and evidence of a spark/ember.  be careful and see if you can fix you saw. :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 14, 2020, 09:23:59 AM
I do not think so, but others may chime in, as this is an assumption on my part.  just a reminder that you are holding/standing next to a machine that explodes gas in a chamber to motivate a system that turns a chain and cuts through a large tree.  do not mean to be dramatic, but with a continued gas leak, and evidence of a spark/ember.  be careful and see if you can fix you saw. :)
It does sound overly dramatic but only until it actually goes boom then it just seems like common sense :) I'm taking it as I believe you mean it, a friendly reminder of the risks from someone who cares. Getting the leak tracked down and fixed is a priority right now as while I think the odds of it going catastrophic are pretty small it's just dumb to keep risking it (or at least it seems like a risk that isn't worth taking for long.) Besides from a practical stand point, it's likely to keep getting worse and I'm sure it is affecting the saws performance.

I have a carb rebuild kit on its way and all the hoses I can see that seem like they'd have anything to do with this will be replaced as well. I'm wondering if the diaphram at the top of the carb is leaking a wee bit and so it's allowing fuel to leak into the carb sometimes when the saw is on its side. I'd rather be milling than wrenching but I'll have to remind myself that this is just another part of the adventure and in the end part of what I enjoy about DIY is the learning. I've rebuilt old motorcycle carbs so this can't be much different :) At least it's not like modern vehicles, it doesn't have an IQ higher than mine and I can pretty easily reach all the parts  8)

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 14, 2020, 09:25:30 AM
Built a new pallet for the boards. This one is 10' x 4' and I figure I'll stack it about 5' tall. I'm hoping I can fit both the 6' and 4' boards on it neatly. It looked pretty nice when I started stacking the boards I'd recently cut on it, starting to look like I might know what I'm doing  8)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0539.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1589462677)

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on May 15, 2020, 10:22:47 AM
Looks good, that will help you with storage a bunch.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 15, 2020, 10:37:44 AM
It seems counter intuitive to me that sitting in front of a computer can be tiring but I guess the brain is a muscle... anyhow I had planned to do some milling when I logged off work yesterday but decided I wasn't mentally there for it. Instead I cut down the weeds and raked up the sawdust around the mill and tried to tidy up a bit. I figure less stuff on the ground is safe from a tripping hazard standpoint and also from a fire risk standpoint. Also got the next log loaded and with the side up I want mill. I've figured out I can do 3 cuts an hour or there abouts when things are going good. I'm sure to those with a bandmill that sounds terribly slow and it's slow to me as well from a production standpoint but I have to keep reminding myself I'm doing this for fun and I don't actually have any quota I have to meet so no need to get worked up over the lack of speed. 

I've been through cutting (I believe that's what its called when you just start at the top and cut boards through to the bottom without turning the cant?) One thought I've had and I'll pose the question to the forum is do I need to be removing the bark on the sides to allow it to dry correctly? I know that you seal the end grain as it weeps water something like 50 times faster than the other faces, will the bark prevent the narrow sides from expelling moisture at an even rate as the two wide faces and thus cause some sort of drying defects? I haven't been edging my boards, just leaving the bark on as it allows me to mill more boards in a given time frame but I'm wondering if I'm potentially causing myself problems down the road?

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 21, 2020, 11:38:11 AM
I was politely corrected it's called Live Sawing when you cut from top to bottom without turning the cant  :P

So I may have resolved the leak in the carb area and it looks like Nebraska wins the golden ticket. I pulled a bit of tube out of the tank, cut the end off and plugged it into the carb and so far no more leaks. The part I cut off looked fine to me so *shrug*. I'll install the new line and filter shortly.

Monday I picked up a little silver maple log about 5' long and 16" dia at the butt. Milled it yesterday and got 5 nice 6/4 boards from it.

Not much else exciting going on. Current plan is to mill the logs I have now and then let them dry while I move on to other projects. I'm sure I'll keep looking for more logs and pick them up as they become available :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on May 21, 2020, 10:30:02 PM
Well go figure..a blind squirrel finds an acorn once in a while. :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on May 25, 2020, 10:40:10 AM
Saturday after work I was all ready to mill the last locust log I had. Got it all set up, took two cuts and the chainsaw was running horribly and while it wasn't leaking fuel out of the side like it had been it was somehow flooding the carb (I think.) It wouldn't idle to for nothing. So I figured now was the time to try and fix it. I have been putting it off as there's always a little part of me that is afraid I'll break it or worse and I'd figured a sorta running saw was better than a not at all running saw. Well I gave myself a pep talk, I've rebuilt motorcycle carbs before, how hard could this really be?

I blew the sawdust off as best I could (my air compressor seems to be on its last legs as well, takes longer to get to 80psi than it should and won't make it to 100psi to shut off like it should... as much as I'd love to upgrade to a much bigger unit I suspect I'll try and fix it instead.. does anyone else ever feel like all you do is fix things instead of doing what you'd really like to be doing?  ok whiny rant over) Took the carb off and put the new parts in it. The old gasket was really stuck on there so I cleaned everything off as best I could. The parts kit was OEM Walbro marked so I'm sure the parts are good but there were more parts than what the diagrams show so I'm assuming it's a one kit fits many models deal, still a bit unnerving having spare parts left over. Put it all back together and tried to start the saw... and nothing. Spent an hour trying to figure out what was wrong and why it was flooding so badly. Had to call it an evening and spend time with the family but it was eating at me. So 430am the next morning I was awakened by a thought, I'd cleaned a bunch of crud out of the carb, maybe the old settings were way to rich now. Later in the day I tried fiddling with the settings but still no dice. I checked the muffler as there was a lot of fluid building up on the cooling fins and was just trying to eliminate variables. Wasn't related I don't think but it's a good thing I did as the muffler bracket is busted and I realized I'm missing the gasket that goes between the muffler and cooling fin so while it runs and I may not be leaking anything it's still something I need to remedy... hooray more parts to order!

I finally took the carb off again and went over it again, blowing all the passages out, etc. When I took the metering side off and put it back together something clicked in my head and I realized that both sides of the arm were forked which I knew meant I had to hook the one side onto the needle but it got me wondering why the other side was forked. I turned the diaphram over and low and behold there's a little head on it just like on the needle that fits into the fork on the other side of the arm. So I hooked it up correctly (wish the mechanics manual would have told me this but they probably assume if you're smart enough to get this far you know enough to connect things  ;) ) Put it all back together and she fired up easily! I still need to fine tune her a bit but success!!!!

I'm still a bit vague on what was causing the initial fuel leak/carb flooding issue. Both diaphrams in the carb looked to be ok, no holes or rips that I could see. Perhaps the metering diaphram somehow became stretched a bit and so allowed more fuel through than it should have? At this point I think I have it all fixed but won't know for certain till I've ran a couple tanks of fuel through with no leaks.

Hopefully I'll get a chance to mill after work today.

Brandon  
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 02, 2020, 10:30:45 AM
Been having problems with my smart phone not allowing headphones or chargers to connect in the port. I figured I'd dropped and damaged it. Been dealing with it for months, sometimes headphones would connect but it was getting more and more touchy. It finally dawned on me... I have it so the port is facing up in my front pocket, sawdust from milling gets in my pockets... took a toothpick and cleaned a lot of sawdust out of the port and now things connect like they should  8) 8)

Figured this forum would get a kick out of that, also something to watch out for if you start having the same issue  :P

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ljohnsaw on June 02, 2020, 11:04:01 AM
Ah, the benefits of an old flip phone!  I have a Samsung Rugby that has a waterproof hatch over my USB port.  The entire phone is water proof to 8'!  Not bad for a $15 phone off of eBay.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 02, 2020, 05:52:46 PM
Ah, the benefits of an old flip phone!  I have a Samsung Rugby that has a waterproof hatch over my USB port.  The entire phone is water proof to 8'!  Not bad for a $15 phone off of eBay.
I sometimes miss old flip phones... it was one thing I owned with an IQ lower than me :D
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 05, 2020, 07:47:40 PM
Milled a few boards Wednesday and at first the saw ran great then it started leaking fuel again out of the carb area  >:(  I'll spare you the boring story but I think I've figured out what is going on. I'm pretty sure it's coming out of the air filter. I think as I mill the air filter gets plugged up with dust, reducing air flow. After a few cuts it must be enough air flow reduction that it's not sucking all of the fuel into the cylinder and eventually leaks out. I also wonder if I was running a bit rich so compounded the problem. 

With the weather heating up I'm finding my strong desire to mill isn't so strong anymore, which means it may be a bit before I can test my theory. I figure I'll have to knock the air filter off every time I refuel. If I didn't still have some nice looking logs I'd give serious consideration to calling it a season but hate to leave the logs sitting as I figure they'll break down and it just seems such a waste. 

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: JJ on June 05, 2020, 10:21:28 PM
plugged air filter while milling is like running WOT with 1/2 choke.
my thought.

At least logs grow on trees :)

     JJ
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 05, 2020, 11:39:10 PM
maybe can work on the saw in the airconditioned basement?  good luck.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 06, 2020, 07:37:37 AM
plugged air filter while milling is like running WOT with 1/2 choke.
my thought.

At least logs grow on trees :)

     JJ
As I understand how carbs work, I'd agree with this statement. 
The pump pumps the same amount of gas but there's less air flow to vaporize it and suck it into the cylinder so fairly quickly it'll pool and either drown the engine or dribble out the air filter if you're milling since it puts the filter parallel with the ground. At least that's how it's working in my mind, we'll see if that's what happens in the real world. The bright side is if I'm right the fix is simple, clean the air filter more often. Only costs a couple minutes of time, best price in the world :)
Heh, logs do grow on trees  :D :D  But my logs are hauled by man power and not always available on a whim so I hate to waste them. But as you point out, if I'm unable to get to them in time at least there's more eventually :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 06, 2020, 07:49:31 AM
maybe can work on the saw in the airconditioned basement?  good luck.
I installed an exhaust fan in the man cave for situations like this but since the walls and door aren't installed yet I am hesitant to utilize it as I don't want to make the basement smell of gas fumes. The man cave is also my office at the moment and I doubt smelling fumes will improve my productivity any ;)
I figure I have to be close to fixing this problem, I've rebuilt the carb, replaced all but the impulse lines (not sure how to get the new one on the cylinder connector as there's not much room there.) As far as I've been able to tell there's no cracks in the boot that goes from the carb to the cylinder. I've leaned out the high and low needle, not too lean I think so hopefully they are tuned right. At this point I really do believe it's just poor maintenance on my part in that the air filter gets clogged, and as JJ pointed out, acts like the choke is on while trying to run the saw. I'd be rather surprised if cleaning the air filter each time I fuel up and maybe a bit of tuning, doesn't solve the problem. It seems a bit excessive to me to clean the air filter so often but as I've thought about it I figure milling creates a LOT of fine powdery dust and with the chainsaw on its side a lot of that dust sits on the bar and so has more time to get sucked into the air intake system. Maybe it's something else and I'm just holding onto this as it's an easy fix and I'll be proven wrong eventually but I won't know until I try :) 
The weather is supposed to be cooler this upcoming week so hopefully I can mill a bit and figure the saw out before it's time to pack it in for a few months. 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on June 06, 2020, 10:08:44 AM
If they are not too expensive you could pick up a couple of spare filters to swap out and clean them later.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on June 06, 2020, 10:15:39 AM
Also wondering if some creatively placed dust shields (being careful not to prevent good air circulation) would help in preventing the dust from being sucked in in the first place. Could experiment with some cardboard, masking tape and zip ties.
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 11, 2020, 11:12:41 AM
Hilltop366, I kept the filter that came with the saw when I bought it. I'd cleaned it with soap and water but hadn't tried using it as I had the new one. 


I milled a log yesterday and had gas leaking out again when I filled up the tank. I'd also had problems with it not starting and running rough. I swapped out the filter to the old one I'd washed months ago. I also left the cover off the carb area to increase air flow and hopefully to see what is going on. Saw ran really well and it looks like the gas is coming out of the tank vent tube/filter thingy at times even when I'm not filling up. Either I'm overfilling the tank (is that even possible?) or I'm guessing the tank vent isn't functioning correctly as I'm thinking it's supposed to allow air movement but prevent liquid from coming out. At the rate I'm going I'm going to have an old saw with all new parts  :D  I guess it's time to wash the "new" filter in soap and water and have it as a spare to swap out when the "old" filter gets too gunky to be brushed off. 

I've also noticed I get a lot of bar oil under the muffler when I'm milling. It seems to be worse when I fill the tank up and subside when the tank is about half full. This leads me to wonder if the case seal in that area is compromised somehow so the bar oil leaks out of the case? Is there any other things it might be?  At this point I'm not sweating it as I can run it and only fill the oil tank half way. 

I'm down to only a few logs left and I'm hoping to finish them by the end of next week, weather and energy permitting. I restacked some of the boards I'd already cut and it's amazing how much moisture has already left them in just a week or so. 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 11, 2020, 12:03:09 PM
your saw may not be functioning perfectly, but you are learning a ton, and putting the knowledgeable members through their paces. :P
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 11, 2020, 02:39:52 PM
I get frustrated at times but in the end I'm not sure I'd have it any other way :) I'm learning a lot along the way and in the end, when I remember what I really care about and not just the tangible goal of a stack of wood, experience and knowledge is what I value most  :P Just have to remember to take a step back at times, smell the roses and relax :) I'm easily tunnel visioned :D

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 11, 2020, 04:10:13 PM
It will admittedly be easier to smell the roses when you no longer smell the gas!  :D .  some days we just want things to go right, and some days they do!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 11, 2020, 04:14:07 PM
It will admittedly be easier to smell the roses when you no longer smell the gas!  :D .  some days we just want things to go right, and some days they do!
Wise words my friend :)
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 16, 2020, 04:56:25 PM
I'm reaching the end of my first whack of logs (it's fun to say as it makes me sound like I have a clue what I'm doing :D)

I think this one has some nice grain

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592339975)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340038)

This little guy crawled out to say hello

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m4.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340073)

I remembered there was an eye bolt in this log and tried to take it out but only tore the eye off. I thought "I'll remember on the last cut or two that there's metal and do something about it..." then I saw something shiny and forgot about the bolt...

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340104)

Fortunately it looks like the bolt got the worst end of it as the chain didn't look too bad.. I don't think... I didn't look to closely  :o

I'm hoping I can figure out a way to combine these logs so the curvy knot parts are together and make a cool river table out of them some day... if not I can always edge them straight

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/M5.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340216)

And under this tarp, it's not an amazing old car but a lot of lumber!!! I bet I'm the only one in a 20 mile radius that has a stack of lumber drying that was milled in their backyard by a chainsaw :D  Aww well, I find it humorous and my neighbors don't seem to mind. I've given a couple wheel barrow loads of sawdust to one neighbor for his raspberry bushes. 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m6.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592339943)

I did swap out to the older filter and the saw ran great, just leaking gas out of the tank vent so I need to look into that but I'll admit I'm not in a hurry as I suspect tomorrow will be my last major milling day this season as I'm hoping to finish the few I have left and then let the poor mans solar kiln do it's thing :)

I don't know how well it works but I did wash the "new" air filter out with soap, hot water and a tooth brush

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/m7.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340470)

I did the same thing to the "old" filter and it works pretty well, at least I think so. If I get another whack of logs for next year I may splurge and buy a brand new air filter but I'm not sure it's really necessary as they seem to wash up pretty well.

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 16, 2020, 06:51:16 PM
sounds like you are having fun, helping out neighbors, and making stuff.  that is the goal for a hobby sawyer IMHO.  it will be fun to see your MC under the tarp.  I hope you and others are pleasantly surprised.  I feel a whack can be a whack, or mini wack, or a micro whack.  all of which can be referred to as a whack.  beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. :D :D :D.  "idle hands are the devils play toy"  or something like that.  is that a pro end coating or the color of one of your children's rooms?!  :D :D :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 16, 2020, 07:26:46 PM
sounds like you are having fun, helping out neighbors, and making stuff.  that is the goal for a hobby sawyer IMHO.  it will be fun to see your MC under the tarp.  I hope you and others are pleasantly surprised.  I feel a whack can be a whack, or mini wack, or a micro whack.  all of which can be referred to as a whack.  beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. :D :D :D.  "idle hands are the devils play toy"  or something like that.  is that a pro end coating or the color of one of your children's rooms?!  :D :D :D
You missed the ever popular "Patty Whack"  :D :D :D :D
It's just a high end paint left over from painting a room. It's not even exterior rated but it seems to have done a darn good job for all that. Wouldn't buy it just for this but it's a great way to use a paint color I don't need anymore.
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Hilltop366 on June 16, 2020, 08:00:20 PM

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/M5.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592340216)

I see a profile of two cats looking at each other, now if you could accentuate the cats and make a table or wall art out of it you could charge a fortune for it to a cat person. ;D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 16, 2020, 08:04:47 PM
i see it hilltop!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 18, 2020, 09:38:02 AM
I think I milled more boards yesterday than at any other time. I'm getting the process down pretty good for my set up  8)

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0566.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592486609)

I've been trying to figure out the best way to mill the log pieces that I'd ripped smaller to move. My jig set up only has about 18" of length so I can't always take as wide a cut as I'd like. Because I have the table and log dogs I can hold things in a position they wouldn't normally stay in and I decided to take advantage of that. 

I used a chalk string and drew a straight line (it's there, I promise  :) )

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0567.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592486874)

Then I cut it so I'd have a flat-ish surface to mount the ladder on

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0568.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592486678)

I wasn't sure how nice the boards would be from the already ripped logs but they are probably some of the nicest I've milled so far. I'll be on the look out for larger diameter logs even though I'll have to rip them smaller to move them.

I moved the boards I'd cut in the beginning onto the same stack as the more recent ones. The plastic sheeting I'm using is not UV rated and the first stack's plastic broke down and tore and it's just easier to maintain one stack.

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0569.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592486598)

I didn't have the energy to mill everything I had like I'd hoped to so I'll have two logs for next season, assuming they don't break down before then. 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/IMG_0570.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1592486598)

This more or less ends my milling for the next few months. It gets pretty hot here and I've realized it's much nicer to mill in cool weather than blistering heat. It's time to work on other projects and let this stack of wood dry and see how it all comes together. I'm hoping to pick up more logs as they become available and build a whack to mill either in the fall or next spring. 

I don't know what the MC is on the first boards I milled and put in the stacks but I will say that the boards I moved were noticeably lighter so I am hopeful that by September the MC will be below 10% in most of the boards. I pulled my MC meter out to check a few but found I didn't have a battery for it and I didn't want to make a trip for a 9V battery so I'll just have to wait. 

Brandon
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 18, 2020, 09:54:24 AM
I figure I'll summarize what I feel I've learned in the year-ish I've been doing this.

1. Don't pick up free wood if you're only goal is to save money and you don't already own a chainsaw  :D
2. If you buy your first chainsaw, it'll lead to buying more and then you'll want to cut down trees with it
3. If you cut down nice trees you'll feel bad cutting them up for firewood and start to wonder if you can turn them into fine lumber
4. You'll do research and realize that nice as it is, a little 50cc homeowner saw just isn't going to handle milling very well
5. You got into this to save money so buying a brand new chainsaw doesn't fit the bill so you'll buy a used one to save money
6. You'll have to learn how to fix the new-used saw as paying someone else to do it doesn't make sense as you're trying to save money
7. Milling on the ground is really hard on your body
8. A nice bench makes milling a LOT easier on the body and gives you options you wouldn't otherwise have
9. Aluminum motorcycle ramps are perhaps not the best ramp to load heavy logs with
10. When that little voice in your head says "You should probably put the other log holder on in case the log decides to escape" you should listen to it
11. Ripping chains do not cut logs faster (at least not that I've noticed) but they leave a MUCH nicer finish
12. Parbuckling is AWESOME
13. Use a ladder or some other device so you have a flat surface to mill against and your boards will be much nicer
14. Use the ladder for every cut otherwise you risk imperfections in the entrance and exit cuts which can grow worse with each cut
15. Clean your chainsaws air filter frequently as milling creates a lot of fine dust and will plug it faster than you think
16. Wear a good face mask or respirator, you don't want that dust in your lungs
17. If your ladder hangs over the log a foot or two you can use it to hold the jig while you bolt the chainsaw bar to it
18. I don't know if I've saved any money doing this but I've learned a lot, met some neat people and had an absolute blast doing it so for me it's been a worthwhile adventure and I'm excited to see where it goes.
19. The wider the cut, the slower your forward speed will be
20. Bark, especially dirty bark, dulls chains fast so if you can remove the bark before you cut it'll extend the cutting life of your chain
21. It still surprises me the difference a sharp chain makes, seriously it's incredible  :o
- . I'll add to this list as I remember more
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 18, 2020, 11:06:56 AM
that is quite a stash.  we have enjoyed learning with you.  maybe sell a few to help with the money savings issue listed.   smiley_beertoast
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 18, 2020, 11:17:19 AM
that is quite a stash.  we have enjoyed learning with you.  maybe sell a few to help with the money savings issue listed.   smiley_beertoast
That thought has crossed my mind. If I continue milling, which I hope to, I don't think I'll ever use all that wood. My major question is how do I determine value? Is Elm similar to say Oak so I can price it comparably? 
Thanks, 
Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 18, 2020, 01:08:52 PM
It is worth what someone will pay for it.  I had folks that looked at a table for sale in CA in the thousands of dollars.  they were told it was an "exotic hardwood"... it was elm.  I would pick a dry slab with character and put a little finish on it to show people.  It makes quite a statement.  since it is not commercially available, people do not know what to expect.  or make a few items ect.  may sell the item, or a slab after they see it finished. :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on June 18, 2020, 01:13:46 PM
Just a safety note.  not sure you want unknown craigslist customers coming to your home with your family.  be careful.  can just sell to friends and family, but comes with other problems sometimes. :D
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 18, 2020, 04:23:11 PM
Excellent points in both posts, thanks! 

We'll see how this batch turns out in a few months then go from there :)

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on June 18, 2020, 09:14:32 PM
I've had a good time watching your journey progress. I agree with you milling isn't fun when its blooming hot out. Just for fun, I just checked a local retail hardwoods shop's prices, common grade Red Oak at 3.29 bf no price for elm.  I would guess  you could ask for more. Those boards would make folks a lot of nice live edge floating shelves, my wife has hinted at some  :). 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on June 19, 2020, 11:21:15 AM
It's this forum and all of the friends I've made on it that has made the journey the enjoyable adventure it has been!  

I don't plan to close this thread but I won't be as active on it for a few months as I have other projects I've been putting off while I've been milling (seriously, gotta get the basement done  :D :D )

Just looked up floating shelves, BRILLIANT IDEA! Maybe I can install some here and then advertise them so people see what they look like and go from there. 

I plan to pick up logs even though I'm not actively milling and you know I'll post them on the thread as I get them :) The fun part is that panicky feeling I've had that I have to get all the logs I can find has worn off. I now want to be a bit more selective in what I pick up and I feel I have a smidge more of an idea of what to look for and what to pass on which is a good feeling.

Thanks,

Brandon 
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Tacotodd on June 19, 2020, 12:07:10 PM
Dont forget the cant hook on your list!
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: ManjiSann on August 11, 2020, 09:10:49 AM
Wow it has been a bit since I've posted  :o  A few members reached out to make sure all was well (thanks, it was very thoughtful  :) ) so I figured I'd log in and say hi!

I did get a chance to run the chainsaw a couple weeks back to cut down a few trees for a neighbor. Nothing big, maybe 6-8" dbh and 20 feet tall but it was a very good learning experience on paying attention to the hinges! 

(https://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/56620/milling.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1597149627)

Had a rope on the tree and my friend was pulling hard but the tree wasn't moving so I kept cutting and started to panic when it sat back and pinched the bar. I wanted it to go one way but because I cut the hinge completely on the one side the tree went 90 degrees to where I wanted it to go. Because of how small the tree was I was careless, rookie mistake  :( Fortunately the only thing injured or damaged was my pride. It took all of a second of looking at the stump for me to figure out what I'd done wrong (thanks to this forum I have learned a few things even if I don't always remember them ;D) It was a good learning lesson and I've taken it to heart. When I cut the tree that was closest to the house which was leaning a bit toward it I moved the rope up higher for better leverage and when my first face cut didn't look right I made a few corrections to it until I felt it was correct then did my back cut and it fell right where I wanted it. As with so many things, success is in the prep work! 

Went camping in June and took the husky with and was going to free hand mill a few logs for giggles to try to make a simple bench or two but instead learned the importance of having a super sharp chain when milling. My chain wasn't dull but it had hit a nail a while back and the angle on the top plate (I think that's the term) was off just a bit so it worked fine for cross cutting but wasn't biting when ripping. Rather than be smart and change out the chain I applied more pressure... and got the nose sprocket hot enough to make the bar peel away from it and destroy the nose sprocket. Bought a new bar and if/when I mill again I'll have to drill the bar to mount the milling jig to it. I'll use the old bar in a vise for sharpening the chain so not a total loss (I could replace the nose sprocket as well but at this time don't think I will.)

We've decided to sell our house and find one that suits our wants/needs a bit more so I've been focused on working and finishing the basement so haven't had time to run the chainsaw otherwise. It's also about 96F here daily and I'm a wimp and think that's just too hot for working outside if I can avoid it. The stack of boards seems to be drying great and I'm thinking it'll be ok in a storage unit for a month or two while we get the house ready to sell. If I have time I'll cut one of the thicker boards and get a reading on moisture and post the results for those wondering how the simple solar kiln is working and want something more than "eh it looks good to me  :D" Or would it work if I drove a couple finishing nails about half way into the board and took a reading off those?

Not milling related but I'll say it's been a great learning experience finishing my own basement. I've done all of it myself from drafting up the plans to framing, electrical, etc with the help of a few friends. I was a bit worried the city inspectors would be hard to work with ( having no prior experience with this and always hearing unpleasant things from contractors) but I've been amazed at how nice, helpful and awesome they've been to work with. 

So not sure what the future holds for my milling adventures. I'm hoping we can find a house with a yard that will allow me to continue but if not I still have a real nice stack of boards and a skill that I'll always value. Even if I don't get to mill much I at least know how and have some small experience dropping trees. 

Hope all is well with everyone else in these crazy times!

Brandon 



Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: doc henderson on August 11, 2020, 11:49:33 AM
great to hear from you!  in your blood now.  keep in touch. :)
Title: Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
Post by: Nebraska on August 11, 2020, 04:05:50 PM
Good to hear from you, I hope you can find a spot that suits your needs. I imagine a place with a bigger yard and a chicken coop. ;) Check in and let US know how it's going.