The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: thedeeredude on July 15, 2005, 06:13:18 PM

Title: circle saw ?
Post by: thedeeredude on July 15, 2005, 06:13:18 PM
When theres deep gouges in the board coming off the mill, does that mean it needs retensioned?  I mean the gouges and inconcistencies like a dull saw, but the saw was just sharpened and you still see them. 
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: woodhaven on July 15, 2005, 08:35:16 PM
Are the gouges the same distance apart? Like every so many inches there is a gouge in the board?
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: UNCLEBUCK on July 15, 2005, 09:53:17 PM
Possibly a bit is out of line , place a wax crayon on or near the guides and turn the blade slowly by hand a full rotation and hopefully you will find the problem also maybe check the blade guides , just a hair of daylight between blade and guides is what I look for and I dont set the guides with the blade running. The lead could also be off or uneven sharpening causing the blade to pull .
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: Jeff on July 15, 2005, 10:28:40 PM
If you dont set the blade when its running, your setting by guess or by golly. if you set it when its not running the saw will be tight on one guide and loose on the other.

Is the saw running decent other then the deep saw marks? Just because a saw tooth is sharp doesnt means it is right. All your teeth need to be the same width.

There are many things that can cause the problem, and most of them are saw tooth problems.
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: Fla._Deadheader on July 15, 2005, 10:29:42 PM

 Unless it's scrubbing on the gig back.  ;) ;D :)
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: Jeff on July 15, 2005, 10:33:25 PM
I said there were many things, not everything. You start with the simple easy stuff. and scuffing on the gig back can also be the result of a tooth problem.
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: UNCLEBUCK on July 16, 2005, 01:12:02 AM
Well I just never stop learning stuff here so I must now bring my blade up to speed and put on a good face shield and lean in and set my guides . I get scuffing on the gig back but I bet I wont anymore . I am going to make the blade my friend . I am going to make the blade my friend !  ;D
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: Ron Wenrich on July 16, 2005, 08:17:03 AM
I have that problem on one of my back up saws.  I have a socket that is bent.  I could get it fixed, but I don't want to spend any money on the saw.

There are 2 awys of finding it.  The easiest way is with a spider guage. 

Another way is to take a flat file and put it against the sides of 3 teeth.  You'll be able to spot one that is way out of line.  File it back into line and get rid of the mark. 

Another problem could be that a tooth is out of alignment with the shank.  Just look at each tooth, and you'll be able to see if they line up.  Easy fix.  Take out and put back in.

A standing saw doesn't normally stand straight.  It stands straight when it runs at the RPM for which its hammered.  That's why you need to set the guides when its running.  Not for the faint of heart.   :D  Not too bad if you have a split guide.  Those horseshoe guides are a lot tougher.  It should take care of your rubbing on the gig back.
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: thedeeredude on July 16, 2005, 09:17:03 AM
Well, I ask because at work it scuffs on the gigback and leaves gouges on the boards, generally they are the same distance.  I asked about tensioning because we don't have our saws hammered.  We just put new teeth in if we hit metal and sharpen them until they no longer exist.  We don't even replace shanks.

Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: Ron Wenrich on July 16, 2005, 09:39:44 AM
Your saws have been tensioned, or they wouldn't be cutting at all.  They only need to be hammered when you replace shanks, or have hit something pretty big.  If you constantly run a hot saw, you can loose tension.  But, generally speaking, a saw will run a  long time before needing tensioned.

Does the saw lay over during the cut?  That can come from a little bit of an angle in the tooth.  That will cause it to run a little in or out.  If it runs out under load, it will stand straight and rub on the return.  Saw guides out of alignment will also cause the gig.  The lead could be off a bit.  Movement in the carriage trucks. 

The gouge isn't a problem unless its so deep that it can't be planed out.  Then its a defect. 

You could always hire me to do some consulting work.   :D



Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: thedeeredude on July 16, 2005, 09:50:17 AM
Well Ron, you know how it is where I work ::)  I just had my first five day work week, though 8)  It'll probably be my last :D
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: woodhaven on July 16, 2005, 10:24:53 AM
If the saw does not wobble on gig back. I mean not at all. Then you have a tooth or shank problem. Are there any gouges on the log while sawing?
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: thedeeredude on July 16, 2005, 10:59:37 AM
I can't be in watching him saw all the time(I;d kinda get fired for not doing my job :D) but the saw stays straight and true on the gig back.  On monday I'll look for gouges in the log.  I asked the question mostly out of curiosity because I didn't understand why it would gouge the boards after just being sharpened, but I guess its the teeth or shanks out of alignment.
Title: Re: circle saw ?
Post by: woodhaven on July 16, 2005, 11:54:51 AM
yep

Let us know what you see.