The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: Nate Surveyor on January 21, 2007, 12:16:18 AM

Title: Why not?
Post by: Nate Surveyor on January 21, 2007, 12:16:18 AM
Why doesn't someone take the Swing blade concept to the next level?

270 swing. (OK, it does not have to go all the way 270, but 250 might do it) Just to get the swing blade out of the way. Then install a BAND  saw on the back side of the mill. Same motor, different pulleys. Have a lever to loosen the drive belts for the circle saw, and one to tighten (engage) the band saw. The band saw is on slides, so when NOT in use, it is UP higher, and out of the way. When needed, push lever, and it rides down, into place, while swinging the circle saw up out of the way.

Make the carriage 8' wide, and mount it on a trailer, with 30' of track. Put an electric winch on it, as well as a full hydraulic log loader. Put the full hydraulics on it.

Now, you can load, and rotate the logs. And adjust one end for taper.
Then open them with a circle saw. Make into cants, and mill the clean cants with a band saw?

It just seems logical to me. And set it up with a 60 hp diesel...

I am not in any position to take the time do do all this designing and manufacturing, but it seems logical...

The best of both worlds.

Include the log follower, so you can maximize production with curved logs. I think computer set works would be nice, but just a rider on the last cut face would do it.

It would take some serious doing to make it a viable and marketable product, but I'd sure like one, after the bugs were worked out!


Nate
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: beenthere on January 21, 2007, 12:31:20 AM
I'd be guessing, but think a saw mfg would do that if they thought there would be a market for such a behemoth.
What would someone pay out for something like that, and what would the transporter be like that would be needed to haul it around? 

Interesting ideas........ eh eh
 :)
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Ianab on January 21, 2007, 01:22:06 AM
ah huh...
depends on your defination of 'portable' all right  ;D
And I'd suggest 'affordable' as well  ;)

Ian
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: JimBuis on January 21, 2007, 01:51:48 AM
By the time you paid for all that engineering in one machine, it would be cheaper to buy a Wood-Mizer LT40 Super and a Peterson WPF.  We can already have the best of both worlds.  All we have to do is pay for them.

Jim
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Nate Surveyor on January 21, 2007, 08:23:15 AM
Well the advantage of this machine is that the log gets handled less. Load it once, and then finished lumber comes off it.

Most of the time, I think in terms of SOLO operations.

Nate
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Nate Surveyor on January 21, 2007, 10:05:03 AM
Ianab,

Could I ask you a question?

In your profile, you say you have a 8" Peterson WPF, with Stihl 090 powerhead?

Are you for real?

:)

Nate

Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Captain on January 21, 2007, 10:22:13 AM
Ian is VERY MUCH for real.  :) However, that power option is no longer built by Peterson.  Advantage was, like an electric motor, the powerhead can tilt with the blade.

Captain
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: BigTrev on January 22, 2007, 03:54:12 PM
We actually had one of those old beasties in for servicing late last year. Such an awesome little machine, surprisingly powerful too for the little engine.

It even made our photo of the month, little story here Link (http://www.petersonsawmills.com/owners_photo_jan07.htm)
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Ianab on January 22, 2007, 04:26:31 PM
Yup.. here is the old beastie in action.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/ianab_06mac12.jpg)

This is using to to rip a straight edge on a bench slab on the back lawn... bet the neighbours love me  :D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/computerdesk04.jpg)

I also imagine that the cost of the big Stihl chainsaws is such that they can put a 4 stoke 13hp honda and gearbox on there for the same price, and get more power and reliability with the new mills  ::)

This pic is with my home made slab surfacer attached, a big Makita router that fits beside the carriage and lets me plane up the big slabs

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/ianab_slab_surfacer05.jpg)

Cheers

Ian
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: brdmkr on January 22, 2007, 11:06:28 PM

This pic is with my home made slab surfacer attached, a big Makita router that fits beside the carriage and lets me plane up the big slabs

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/ianab_slab_surfacer05.jpg)



You had to up and post that picture.  I got, I say I got, to make me one of those.  I want one every time I see yours!

Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: getoverit on January 22, 2007, 11:36:50 PM
I have both the Peterson 10" ATS  AND a hydraulic band saw. It is not unusual for me to make 10" square cants out of whopper size logs and then resaw the cants into useable lumber with the bandmill later on.
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Nate Surveyor on January 23, 2007, 08:10:47 AM
A cant 10" x 10" x 20.5' is HEAVY. How do you move the cant?

Logs roll, but cants stop!

Nate
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: getoverit on January 23, 2007, 08:48:22 AM
that is when the truck crane comes in handy ;)
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Norwiscutter on January 23, 2007, 09:51:04 AM
If a guy is thinking of spending 30-40 grand on a sawmill, he might as well invest another 20-30 on something to move around the large stacks of lumber, slabs, logs, sawdust etc. that are going to most certainly be the result.  If a guy intends on trying to keep things small, then I don't think it is necessary for him to have a 40,000 dollar mill in the first place. You would spend an hour sawing and the rest of the day cleaning up the mess you just made.  You will find that most everyone here that has bought a bigger sawmill has already had, or very soon bought, a tractor/skidloader/Lull/forklift/etc. to address the subsequent logistical issues.
Title: Re: Why not?
Post by: Ianab on January 23, 2007, 04:06:04 PM
Quote
If a guy intends on trying to keep things small, then I don't think it is necessary for him to have a 40,000 dollar mill in the first place.

True, as you go up in sawmill performance, you are going to need either machinery or more crew to support it (probably both). Sure you can run a fully hydralic bandmill or an ASM swingmill by yourself easy enough, but you aren't going to be able to work it to anything like it's full capacity without machinery and a couple more workers. If the blades not in the wood you aint making boards  ;)

Ian