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Author Topic: ICE AND SNOW  (Read 1293 times)

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Offline alan gage

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2019, 04:54:23 PM »
The reason for the high spot is so when the screws begin to back out the water does not run down the threads.

Otherwise if its in the flat spot the water will hit the threads and run right down them and rot the wood.

If you look at actual documentation from the manufacturers you will find they all recommend screwing through the high points. especially at panel seams. Otherwise the panel seam will come apart.
I have looked at the documentation from multiple manufacturers and they've all said to put the screws in the flat. Never seen one say otherwise but have seen plenty of people put them in the ribs, especially older roofs with nails instead of screws. Where the panels are joined a screw goes on each side of that rib so the edge of each panel is fastened.
Alan
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Offline Crusarius

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2019, 05:03:10 PM »
I would love to see that documentation. But what I want to know is do they mean the flats of the ribs?

Offline alan gage

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2019, 05:12:56 PM »
I would love to see that documentation. But what I want to know is do they mean the flats of the ribs?
From Fabral:


This manufacturer shows fastening on page 6. They do show a screw going through the rib but it's only a stitch screw to joint the two panels. It doesn't fasten them to the roof deck. https://www.metalsales.us.com/system/files/resources/installation-guides/classic-rib-installation-guide8-2016.pdf

Alan
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Offline Mike W

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2019, 05:17:50 PM »
Metal roof I just installed by Fabral, below is an exert from their installation manual.  Been a general contractor since 94 and been building since the mid 80's (yea dating myself).  built 100's of homes / barns / out buildings / shops, etc. with metal roofing and or both roofing and siding.  Before screws became the industry standard, nailing would occur on the high rib part of the profile as we all know nails pull easily even with ring shanks when stressed due to thermal gain and loss.  Heck even the screws need attention here and there as they back out as well.  I'd say, just glue it down and be done with it :D ;D  

FABRAL can supply either screws or nails for fastening into dimension lumber. Always use screws with solid sheathing. Screws for use with steel panels are galvanized and then coated with an organic polymer for optimum corrosion resistance. For best results with aluminum panels, use #300 series stainless steel screws. Wood screws with combination metal and neoprene washers should be installed in the flat area of the panel adjacent to the ribs, and tightened such that the washer is compressed as illustrated above. This will ensure a lasting, leak-proof seal. REMOVE ANY METAL FILINGS CREATED BY THE DRILLING ACTION OF THE SCREWS OR PRE-DRILLING OF THE HOLES TO AVOID RUST STAINING ON THE PANEL SURFACE. Refer to the fastening schedules in this booklet for the correct fastener locations.

Offline Crusarius

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2019, 09:06:50 PM »
well thats a first for me. I still like the top of the ribs better. Less likely to cause rot at the screw holes.

Offline Chuck White

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2019, 09:15:52 PM »
As a general rule, if you use screws they go in the flats, if you use nails they go in the ribs!  ;)
~Chuck~
Retired USAF 1989, Retired School Bus Driver 2012, now semi-retired Mobile Sawyer
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Offline PineNut

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #26 on: February 27, 2019, 11:28:29 AM »

I have some metal roofs and the screws are in the flat part of the metal. There are two different types of screws used to hold it down. The older type has a dished shaped washer head with a neoprene washer under it. The other type has a cup shaped washer head. The neoprene washer is inside the cup. When pulled completely down, the neoprene washer is compressed the correct amount and not too much. Also the edges of the neoprene washer are protected from the elements. I have both types and I prefer the cups.

Offline Chuck White

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #27 on: March 14, 2019, 06:51:47 AM »
Next question, should the point of the screw go all the way through the purlins or OSB?

I've heard yes because you don't want frost forming on the end of the screw as it will tend to push the screw up!

~Chuck~
Retired USAF 1989, Retired School Bus Driver 2012, now semi-retired Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG25 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider, Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener and single-tooth setter, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain a Wood-Mizer

Offline 47sawdust

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #28 on: March 14, 2019, 07:39:34 AM »
With a sheathed ,4x8, you don't have much choice but to penetrate the sheet.When using purlins I prefer a rough cut 2x4.It allows a bigger rafter spacing,a larger overhang and prevents screw from working loose.Mind you I only use this method on out buildings.A house or heated building should be sheathed and have ice/water shield and /or a membrane such as 30# felt,tri-flex etc. to prevent condensation.Use good trade practices relevant to the area you live in,and yes metal roof is screwed through the flats,but nailed through the ridge according to ABC roofing supplier installation guide.
Mick
1997 WM Lt30 1999 WM twin blade edger Kubota L3750 Tajfun winchGood Health Work is my hobby.

Offline luap

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Re: ICE AND SNOW
« Reply #29 on: March 19, 2019, 03:20:34 PM »
Got to thinking (it can be dangerous and costly) the other day since I have a metal roof on the house and the metal has ridges every 9" apart why not run PEX in the ridges and pump hot water threw them to get the snow to melt. Normally it will slide off by itself, but this year we have not had a above freezing day for 52 days and the next week supposed to have below zero temps all week. Snow and ice build up is about 30" now. The water could be heated with a heat exchanger plumbed into our heating system and closed off when not needed. Of course you'd need to have anti freeze in that system. What do you all think?
I think any heat is going to melt the snow only in proximity to your pex, the water will run down the roof and when it contacts the cold eave it will freeze and build an ice dam making the problem worse. The best solution in the snow country is a double insulated, vented roof.
luap


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