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Author Topic: Building "sawhorses"  (Read 33040 times)

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Offline The Creative Hand

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2015, 04:38:26 PM »
I made a pair of saw horses out of ash that was cut in my neighbor's yard. I appreciate all that people posted on this thread to get my ideas going. I'm good at making things overly complicated so instead of just a normal mortise and tenon (and also because the top piece was smaller than I would have liked), I made the top joint a shouldered bridal joint and the bottom mortise and tenons with shoulders as well. I also didn't start with square stock, so that made the joinery more complicated. This was my first timber framing project, and I think it turned out pretty well, considering. Here are a couple pictures. I still need to trim the pegs and finish up the detailing but I wanted to use them to plane the white oak bench top I am making.

 

  

 
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Offline Brian_Weekley

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #61 on: January 18, 2015, 05:17:29 PM »
Welcome to the forum.  That's quite the slab of white oak!  Nice looking ponies too.  They should hold it!
e aho laula

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #62 on: January 18, 2015, 07:15:25 PM »
Welcome to the Forum! Do you have a forklift to move those things? ;D
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Offline LewAz

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #63 on: January 19, 2015, 07:01:51 PM »
http://macmullin.net/wp/timber-saw-horse/ We are in the process of building these. Awesome trestle horses

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #64 on: January 20, 2015, 02:51:28 AM »
I've been working with another framer lately.  I'm preparing for a big project where we need to set up a lot of timbers to work on.  I've made cribbing ponies in the past, but he said the problem with cribbing ponies is that you are always stepping over the cribbing timber and can get to be a pain in the butt.  On the other hand, free standing heavy timber horses are just that - heavy, plus they take a lot of time to make if cutting mortise and tenon.  So he gave me the following picture of saw horses he uses at his shop and I determined the angles from the pictures.  These are a lot easier to build from 2X material, lighter to move around, strong, and allow freedom walking around timbers. I found a guy with 60 used 2X8's from something that was torn down.  I de-nailed, re-sawed, planed, and am just finishing 28 saw horses.  He used actual 3"x6" stock for he backs.  I glued up two pieces of the 2X material and ended up about 2.75 inches thick after planing.
 

  

 
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Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #65 on: September 03, 2016, 11:12:43 PM »
These sawhorses have been awesome.  Best I've ever used.  Best combination of strength to weight.  I can load them up with oak timbers and no problems.  Not bad from reclaimed 2x material.  Using a compound mitre saw made the compound cuts for the legs go quite fast.  We have used these horses for two frame raisings and kept them onsite as the regular framers use them alot too.  Rolled a lot of hardwood timbers on them too - de-nailing reclaimed timbers.

 

 
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline Czech_Made

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #66 on: September 05, 2016, 08:13:37 AM »
Saved the pictures, thanks for sharing.

I've been working with another framer lately.  I'm preparing for a big project where we need to set up a lot of timbers to work on.  I've made cribbing ponies in the past, but he said the problem with cribbing ponies is that you are always stepping over the cribbing timber and can get to be a pain in the butt.  On the other hand, free standing heavy timber horses are just that - heavy, plus they take a lot of time to make if cutting mortise and tenon.  So he gave me the following picture of saw horses he uses at his shop and I determined the angles from the pictures.  These are a lot easier to build from 2X material, lighter to move around, strong, and allow freedom walking around timbers. I found a guy with 60 used 2X8's from something that was torn down.  I de-nailed, re-sawed, planed, and am just finishing 28 saw horses.  He used actual 3"x6" stock for he backs.  I glued up two pieces of the 2X material and ended up about 2.75 inches thick after planing.
 

 (Image hidden from quote, click to view.) 

 (Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

Offline swmn

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #67 on: August 14, 2019, 11:27:04 AM »
I have one of the design Brad_bb shared far enough built to think I am going to like these.  I still need the end aprons on this one, but I intend to carve those up this morning.  

Rather than bang out 20 or 30 of them like Brad did I took this as an opportunity to make some guides and chisel out some mortises.  

I have found 4x6 at my place is too big for any of my vises and too small to work on without clamping somehow to something.  I have just about outgrown my inexpensive Asian holdfasts and plan to upgrade to a pair from Crucible tool when I have a big enough pile of shekels.

 



Yup, not bad.  Once I figured out the short leg of my 14-76-90 triangle was 0.374" I did the layout on the second one at 3/8" kerf, pare, done.    Now all I to do is complete a pair.



 

 

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #68 on: August 14, 2019, 06:57:05 PM »
It looks like you're making it a lot harder than it needs to be.  Or are you doing that on purpose?  To make my version all you need is a mitre saw, and a table saw.  To make the 20 degree angle on the back to mount the legs, you just set your table saw blade at 20 and 2 inches high and run the back through on each side.  I'm assuming that and you were just being fancy?

Same thing on the cross tie for the legs.  Just cut the top at 14 on the table saw and you're done.

I see the compound angle on your legs isn't done yet.  That is why the mitre saw is so fast.  You can pop out the legs and cross ties super fast.  The first time I made these horses I borrowed a friends dewalt compound sliding mitre saw and stand.  I whipped out the parts in no time and then went and bought my own saw.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline swmn

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #69 on: August 14, 2019, 07:16:33 PM »
Actually Brad I work with hand tools in my shop to let off steam from the high pressure job that pays the bills.  I don't even own a table saw.

I am leaving the legs with the points on them since I am going to use these outside on relatively soft ground, I want the feet to sink in and hold still.

If I was making thirty of these, absolutely I would run a table saw and a miter saw and get it over with.  Tonight I get to go home from work and chop some more mortises while the cares of the day drift away with each mallet blow.

Thanks for the design idea, I have wanted saw horses that could take holdfasts for several months; I really like the first one.

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #70 on: August 14, 2019, 08:56:37 PM »
I never thought of making the backs thicker like that to hold a holdfast.  That might be good for cutting braces- to hold them in place.  Before I just used a clamp to clamp the brace to the horse.  I have 4 nice blacksmith made hold fasts.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline swmn

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #71 on: August 14, 2019, 09:20:35 PM »
I never thought of making the backs thicker like that to hold a holdfast.  That might be good for cutting braces- to hold them in place.  Before I just used a clamp to clamp the brace to the horse.  I have 4 nice blacksmith made hold fasts.
Yup.  Ought to be handy for braces too.  I was specifically thinking of 4x6 timbers for Sobon shed rafters since I can get them from a local saw mill, but 4x4 braces ought to do fine under holdfasts as well.  I am, ummm, not amused with the life expectancy of big box home store F clamps.
I thought your back would be thick enough to hold a holdfast, and it is.  
I made a doohickey out of plywood tonight with mine too.  When our house was built one of the bath tub drains runs not beside or between but actually through a floor joist.  Leaning on the sawhorse is the old water damaged patch (our floors are held up by the 2x10 "equivalent" I- joists), on the horse is the new one I banged out with circular and jigsaw without ever having to reclamp.  I just got it lined up so all the pencil lines were off the horse back, whackamole, and cut.


 

Offline btulloh

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #72 on: August 14, 2019, 09:26:28 PM »
 I have 4 nice blacksmith made hold fasts.
Im envious. I need to find a blacksmith to make a couple for me. My storebought hold fasts just dont have the right mojo. 
HM126

Offline swmn

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #73 on: August 14, 2019, 09:37:20 PM »

Im envious. I need to find a blacksmith to make a couple for me. My storebought hold fasts just dont have the right mojo.
 Mine didn't when new either.  One thing I did was make circumferential grooves in the shafts by holding 60 grit sandpaper in my fist, wrapped around the shaft, while twisting.  Not spiral grooves.  Circumferential.  Twist, relax, shift, tighten, twist.  If it helps a little do it some more.  Mine look pretty rough, but they work now.

Offline btulloh

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Re: Building "sawhorses"
« Reply #74 on: August 14, 2019, 10:05:05 PM »
My main problem is the arms are too rigid. Not enough spring. I thing its a problem with the material more than the shape. I could probably cut a few grooves with an angle grinder but Id just like a couple that were made right to begin with. Lee Valley has some that probably work well. Something about having some made by a blacksmith is attractive though. 
HM126


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