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Author Topic: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures  (Read 9753 times)

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Offline SawyerTed

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #320 on: February 16, 2020, 08:52:58 PM »
My customer with the purple walnut log end seal uses different colors for different sawing dates and species. They are all recorded and he tracks moisture prior to moving the lumber into conditioned air storage.  He's used red, blue, orange, yellow and purple so far.
Woodmizer LT35HD25, Kubota MX5100, IH McCormick Farmall 140, Granberg Alaskan Chainsaw Mill, Husqvarna 372XP, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Ram 3500 6.7 Cummins

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #321 on: February 20, 2020, 07:55:26 AM »
The weather was pretty nice yesterday, high 30's. It's funny, I think that's cold and don't want to do anything then I read OG's posts about working in 10 degree or lower weather... I'm a wimp it would seem  ::)  But once I get going I really appreciate the cold weather as I tend to heat up and the cool keeps it comfortable  8)

So I dollied one of the logs over to the patio, put the ladder on it and started my cut



There was a slight incline and between that and the bark it was tough going. It takes time to cut then rotate the log and get the ladder set up for the next cut but I think going forward I'll consider it time well spent as the amount of effort I had to use to make the cuts had me wondering if I'd somehow dulled the chain instead of sharpened it  >:(

I did use the metal detector and it seemed to indicate something in a few spots so I took my axe and removed the bark in those areas but didn't find anything. After a couple cuts I did find this though 





I must be doing something right in my life as I've managed to avoid any major metal hits thus far, knock on wood. 

This wood is really pretty! I don't think I'll be using a stain when I finish it, just something to bring out the already amazing color it has. I'm super excited to work with it once it's dry!



About half way through I was getting rather worn out... I'm really out of shape  :-[  I have a co-worker that says a change is as good as a break so rather than sit down and take a break I decided to edge the boards. I bought a couple 5ah batteries for my circular saw, FANTASTIC! Well worth the investment in my opinion! I've discovered that my little 6 1/2" dia saw leaves a wee bit uncut if the board is 9/4. 



After a short break I cut a few more boards. Again, the wood is just amazing! This log had some rot in it and this pic shows the beginning of where I started to get into it



I started edging again and the saw was struggling to get through the cut and I started wondering what was up so I pulled the blade and found...



I had a skip tooth blade!!!  :D :D :D  Works well in chainsaws I'm told, not so hot in a circular saw. So it was off to the store for a replacement. I decided to take another members advice and bought a Diablo and it works very well.



I finished the log and edging in the time I had but I was pushing it on energy. I did set up one of those simple solar kilns but was too beat to take a picture, I'll get one in a bit. It's not very impressive with only a few boards in it but it'll be amazing once I have a few piles in it. 

I've realized I have a ton more wood than what I'll need for the Miller chairs I'm hoping to build so I'm thinking the rest will go for legs and cabinets and such for the reloading bench. I think the natural color of this Elm will go really nice with the maple bench top. 

On a side note, I've decided I want to build a platform to do the milling on as all this bending over and kneeling really takes a toll on me. A year ago I started to build a welding table but eventually reality set in and I realized it was too big for the space I have and so the 4" x 3/8" angle iron has been sitting in my garage begging to be used for something so I could have the space back. I think I'll weld a 5' by 2 or 3' top that is super stable and some removable loading ramps and a winch or something to get the logs on it. I figure 1.5' to 2' tall should suffice. As much as I'd love to deal with 3' dia logs the reality is I can't move them so I think 2' dia or slightly bigger is what I'll build for. 

Anyhow, it's good to be back to milling!

Brandon 
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Offline doc henderson

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #322 on: February 20, 2020, 09:24:36 AM »
"knock on wood",  now that is funny!!! :D
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #323 on: February 20, 2020, 09:53:16 AM »
I had a skip tooth blade!!!

Been there, done that.  Amazing how a full set of teeth come in handy! smiley_old_guy
On a side note, I've decided I want to build a platform to do the milling on as all this bending over and kneeling really takes a toll on me.

What about a table that the top is adjustable.  Down lower to load and then one end raises up to 30░ or so, so you really cut down hill making the best use of gravity?
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #324 on: February 21, 2020, 09:47:27 AM »
ljohnsaw, I'd love an adjustable height table! But that costs money and this year's motto is paying off debt so gotta keep things cheap or in this case pretty much free. :)

I keep toying with different things and ideas and as is usual for me I start out simple, add things, it gets complicated and then I realize I'm not going to do that and I start over simple again... rinse and repeat.

I think I'm going to use the basic frame I already have, add some center supports and legs and an attachment for a hand operated winch to load the logs, ramp attachments and a few basic things and call it good. Most of this except for the winch I already have so it fits the overall plan of free  8)

I really wish I could make the table longer or able to be raised but for now 4' or so logs are likely all I'm going to work with so a 10' table isn't really needed. The adjustable part would be awesome but that'll have to come later. Maybe next year I can do a different table with nicer features :)

I'm also struggling with the time thing, do I take time to make this or just deal with the sore muscles and get the milling done, then there's all the other projects I should/want to be doing. it's all about balance  ::)

Brandon 
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #325 on: February 21, 2020, 10:48:28 AM »
I'd love an adjustable height table!
 
OK, how about this.  Make a frame (10' long? - Uni-strut would be pretty good here) and set the middle of it on the left end of the table.  Make that a pivot point.  With it tipped up(down?), you have a ramp that you pull the log up.  If not too heavy, stand the log up on end and flop it onto the frame.  Strap the log on temporarily.  Then, set an angle that works best for sawing down hill (or go all the way flat), attaching a brace from the high end down to the other legs.  You might have to drop in a cross piece to keep the log from sliding down.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #326 on: February 26, 2020, 07:26:35 PM »
After a LOT of thought and dreaming I decided to make the basic table. I figure if I keep this up then maybe next year I'll build a nicer/bigger one but for now this should (hopefully) allow me to work with what I likely will get. A 10' table with all the trimmings would be nice but since I can physically only move 4' logs, it seems waste. Beside if I built the bigger one then I'd want to build the stuff so i could haul logs worthy of it  :D  It's a slippery slope. Anyhow, enough of my odd thought process, here's some pics

The table square was part of the welding table I was building and decided not to finish so that saved me a bunch of time this go around. Cut some legs 24" tall. I figure this will mean a 24" dia log plus 3" for the ladder thickness will have me just a hair over 4' off the ground which for my height is comfortable. 



I'd love to tell you it came out perfectly level and square.. well none of y'all are here so I'll lie and tell you it came out perfectly square  ;) ;)  Nothing a shim or two won't fix or if it REALLY starts to bug me I can weld some leveler feet on it.

I spaced the ribs a bit off the bottom and ensured they were super accurate with my very precise and expensive pine leveling stick 



I will need to round the corners a bit so I don't gouge myself but all in all it worked out well. I'm curious to see how my welds hold up. I'm not a welder, I just stick metal together and hope it holds.

I did an adjustable log dog thingler. I'm tired of wedging wood under the log and hoping it'll hold. I also have some pieces that are split into quarters already so I'm hoping with the log dog set up I can safely saw them into nice lumber. Hopefully this table will allow me to safely do stuff I couldn't before  8)



I still have some finishing to do but all in all I'm really happy with how it all went together and curious to see how it works. I have some metal left over I can add or make a few changes once I use it and see what works and what doesn't. 

It was also fun as a friend called up while I was doing this and asked if I could repair a part for him that he needed welded. It was cool to already have everything out so when he came over we put a couple welds on it and away he went  ;D

Brandon
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Offline Nebraska

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #327 on: February 26, 2020, 09:59:58 PM »
Looks good Brandon smiley_thumbsup.   You can make an extension for the table easily enough when the time comes. I'm waiting for the free old bicycle log arch to appear.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #328 on: February 27, 2020, 08:14:14 AM »
Build things to make things easier for you. That is what I do.
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #329 on: February 27, 2020, 11:15:21 AM »
Looks good Brandon smiley_thumbsup.   You can make an extension for the table easily enough when the time comes. I'm waiting for the free old bicycle log arch to appear.
Thanks :) I'm still pondering the log arch thing. My only problem with using bicycle tires, free or otherwise, is how much weight can they hold?  I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot. 
I'm sure I'll build an arch or some sort of dolly, just not sure when. Until I do, I still have a whack of logs I can mill  8) 8)
Brandon 
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Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #330 on: February 27, 2020, 12:39:08 PM »
I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot.
I've EASILY had 500 pounds on mine - probably close to 800.  What does a green 8x12x14' pine weigh?  At 1,000 pounds, you probably would have some difficulty physically moving it.  If you are worried about ruts, use wheelbarrow tires for a lower ground psi with the fat tires.
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #331 on: February 27, 2020, 02:35:28 PM »
I think anything I build needs to be at a minimum 500lb rated, preferably closer to 1000lbs. With that much weight I'm concerned the bike tires would collapse or gouge into the ground a lot.
I've EASILY had 500 pounds on mine - probably close to 800.  What does a green 8x12x14' pine weigh?  At 1,000 pounds, you probably would have some difficulty physically moving it.  If you are worried about ruts, use wheelbarrow tires for a lower ground psi with the fat tires.
Oky doky! I'll start watching the local ads for some free bikes :)  
I agree about the difficulty moving it at 1000 lbs but I prefer to over build and have me be the limiting factor. 
Brandon 
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #332 on: March 01, 2020, 09:53:04 AM »
Het Brandon, I think I found a weight calculator for you when I was poking around last night. It's called "log Weight" and it just gives weight for a given length and diameter. It has a lot of species in there with the densities listed. I think it may be doing a straight volume calc and not figuring taper so you may have to mess around with picking SED, LED, or average diameter. It's very quick and simple, no recording, just gives you the weight. For BF and all the other goodies I still recommend SawLogClac.
 Keep cuttin'!
Tom
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Offline Hilltop366

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #333 on: March 01, 2020, 11:05:33 AM »
Maybe you can find one of those fat tire bikes for extra flotation.

Offline doc henderson

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #334 on: March 01, 2020, 11:08:08 AM »
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline Hilltop366

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #335 on: March 01, 2020, 11:13:39 AM »
 :D When I saw it was Queen I thought for sure it was going to be


Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #336 on: March 01, 2020, 11:51:36 AM »
Het Brandon, I think I found a weight calculator for you when I was poking around last night. It's called "log Weight" and it just gives weight for a given length and diameter. It has a lot of species in there with the densities listed. I think it may be doing a straight volume calc and not figuring taper so you may have to mess around with picking SED, LED, or average diameter. It's very quick and simple, no recording, just gives you the weight. For BF and all the other goodies I still recommend SawLogClac.
 Keep cuttin'!
Tom
OG, thanks for the info! 
I think I'll give the SawLogCalc app a look. I don't need the extra bells and whistles right now but for $2.99 if I buy the full thing it's a very reasonable price. For now I just wanted to know weights as we are using brute strength to move these logs and it's fun for bragging rights to say we moved a log that weighed xxx lbs  ;D  I am interested in the densities part though as at some point I need to figure out how to use my moisture meter a bit more accurately.
Brandon
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #337 on: March 01, 2020, 12:02:53 PM »
I had planned to do a bit more welding yesterday so this Wednesday I could try out the bench and mill a log or two. However, I found another log I could pick up. Ad said it was maple so I was excited... turned out to be more Siberian Elm which is awesome as well. Hopefully I can get some variety going forward but when you are looking for free stuff you can't be super choosy.

Home owner said the tree had been dropped about 3 months ago so I was wondering if the wood had deteriorated, not knowing how this stuff works. Figured it would be a good educational experience no matter how it went. 

Homeowner said it was a 16" dia by 24' long... turned out to be 20" dia at the base and over 24' long. Cut it into 4 6' long logs and loaded into two trucks



My friend and his son were kind enough to come help, couldn't have done it without them!

My poor truck didn't fair quite so well, the tail gate is a bit more rainbow shaped than flat... note to self, remove tailgate before loading logs in the future.

We were fortunate enough to be able to back right up to the logs which was super helpful.

When we got home another neighbor was kind enough to help us unload them.

I'd say I have enough logs for now but who would I be fooling  ;)  I'm sure I'll keep an eye out for more but for now I need to get these milled and drying. Also need to figure out where to store the wood once it's dried.

The major head scratcher I have at the moment is how am I going to load them on the bench. I think a ramp is a good idea but I only have a comealong and will hopefully have a couple cant hooks soon. For those of you who don't use a tractor or hydraulic loader to get logs on your mill decks, how are you doing it?

Brandon 
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #338 on: March 01, 2020, 03:45:27 PM »
Thanks to member Furby for the PM with suggestions on how to load the table!


One other question, is Elm saw dust ok to use on plants? Would like to give some to my neighbor for his raspberry bush and want to make sure it's not toxic like black walnut.

Brandon 
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #339 on: March 01, 2020, 04:15:40 PM »
Brandon, to lift your logs a chain hoist or come along on a tripod would be inexpensive enough.  The tripod if designed right could fold way for storage.

Raise the log, put your table under the log then lower into place. 

A tripod could also assist in loading logs on your truck.  Again if done correctly it should easily be portable.
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