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Author Topic: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures  (Read 5418 times)

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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #60 on: November 08, 2019, 04:04:52 PM »
I am no expert I used an Alaskan mill quite a bit and In my opinion you need to work your chain over some or your bar is wore out my bords were smother with a ripping chain from Bayles
@captain_crunch When you say I need to work my chain over what are you meaning? I'm interested in any tips/tricks you are willing to share.
I think there's still life in the bar but then again maybe I don't know what I'm looking for. How does one know if the bar is worn out?
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #61 on: November 08, 2019, 04:08:27 PM »
Captains post made me think, if the teeth are not all the same length would that contribute to a rough board?  The teeth and rakers are sharp and set correct ( I believe :D ) but when sharpening a chain some teeth are duller or roller over a bit so I have to sharpen them down a bit more so they are not as long. 

I'm thinking about it like a table saw blade, if one tooth was offset a bit more than the other I'd imagine you'd get a groove every time it went through the cut.. I'm realizing the same would be true with a chainsaw chain?

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #62 on: November 08, 2019, 04:16:55 PM »
I use a no pin Wagner.  if you are near the desert, you can prob. get down to 19 to 12 % MC air drying.
Googled wagner pinless moisture meter and the prices made me  :o :o  I was thinking around $50, those were a bit more than that  :D  I suppose if I continue down this path I'll have to get good equipment but at the moment that's more than my poor wallet can handle.

I've been doing a bit of googling and it seems like if I want to build furniture or anything of the like that below 10% is what I'm shooting for?

At the moment I'm not sure a kiln is in my future, at least not my near future. Is it possible to build nice furniture with air dried wood? 

I'm currently thinking if I can get a supply of logs I'll have to sticker and dry them outside with corrugated sheet metal on the top and a platform raised a bit off the ground (I'm thinking treated wood frame floor of sorts on cinder blocks or something of the kind) to help keep the rain and sun off them a bit. I don't expect to come into any amazing whack of logs, just a few here and a few there from neighbors/friends/tree services/wood sprites that are moving to the city ;). I have done a lot of lurking around the forum on the subject but it's a lot of info to try and digest in a short amount of time  :P :P or I'm over complicating it   ;D

Much as I really want to build a shed or other structure, with lack of funds and the weather becoming winter. it's not going to happen if I'm being honest. Gotta figure out how to do this on a shoe string budget... gotta enjoy the challenge!  8)

Anyhow, lunch break is over, back to work

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #63 on: November 08, 2019, 05:55:39 PM »
Brandon, first know that I have read every one of your posts and enjoyed your discovery, enthusiasm, and joy. Some of your posts are the bright spot in my day. So understand I am talking to you as a friend, not a critic. I am on your side and want to continue to see you have fun.
 I see a lot of myself in the things you do and the way you think it through. You are a planner and thinker, as I am. I believe it is good to have a plan, but at this point you are ruining your own fun by thinking too much. ;D 
 You are on a fun trip, but sometimes you have to just wake up in the morning and see what this 'new town' has to offer you. Work your way through the steps and learn as you go what it is you want. Make something small and see how it turns out. You may decide to alter direction along the way. I was in the EXACT same spot a year ago and I am still making changes as I go. (Moving my entire mill to a new location is a big job for me alone, especially as the weather degrades. Was it dumb to be where I started? No, it made sense then. It no longer makes sense, hence the move and lost time. I learned and grew a bit.)

 When you say "make furniture" do you mean rustic stuff, or finely joined and finished stuff? Finely joined means KD lumber to me. Rustic stuff has a life and can 'move' during it's life without issue. Air dried, or even less can work fine for rustic. I would start there, it's a good challenge and will give you an idea of how your skills match up with the task.

 CSM work is tough. Getting through a log takes time. I have a stationary bandsaw and I still wound up with a bunch of logs I am trying to get through. But as you know, working alone takes a LOT more time. So a few logs, in dribs and drabs may be all that you can handle. Right now I have 3 or 4 I need to mill up before I begin moving the saw. I am trying to decide what to mill these logs to because I don't yet know what I am doing with them. You could easily wind up in the same situation with just a few logs.

 I buy cheap tools until I really learn what I need, then get good ones. I bought a very cheap moisture meter on fleabay ($15) and thought it would at least give me an idea. I brought some wood to a friend for planing and he insisted that nothing went in his planer that was over 15%. Mine said 14% and his said 13%. His cost $300., mine cost $15. and my confidence is higher.

Relax, enjoy the ride. YMMV :D ;D
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #64 on: November 08, 2019, 07:26:28 PM »
Brandon, first know that I have read every one of your posts and enjoyed your discovery, enthusiasm, and joy. Some of your posts are the bright spot in my day. So understand I am talking to you as a friend, not a critic. I am on your side and want to continue to see you have fun.


@Old Greenhorn Thank you for your kind words, I didn't take anything as a criticism :)

I see a lot of myself in the things you do and the way you think it through. You are a planner and thinker, as I am. I believe it is good to have a plan, but at this point you are ruining your own fun by thinking too much.  


Heh, you've got my number for sure! I do often overthink things. Thanks for the reminder it's supposed to be fun!

You are on a fun trip, but sometimes you have to just wake up in the morning and see what this 'new town' has to offer you. Work your way through the steps and learn as you go what it is you want. Make something small and see how it turns out. You may decide to alter direction along the way. I was in the EXACT same spot a year ago and I am still making changes as I go. (Moving my entire mill to a new location is a big job for me alone, especially as the weather degrades. Was it dumb to be where I started? No, it made sense then. It no longer makes sense, hence the move and lost time. I learned and grew a bit.)


I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  

When you say "make furniture" do you mean rustic stuff, or finely joined and finished stuff? Finely joined means KD lumber to me. Rustic stuff has a life and can 'move' during it's life without issue. Air dried, or even less can work fine for rustic. I would start there, it's a good challenge and will give you an idea of how your skills match up with the task.


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!

CSM work is tough. Getting through a log takes time. I have a stationary bandsaw and I still wound up with a bunch of logs I am trying to get through. But as you know, working alone takes a LOT more time. So a few logs, in dribs and drabs may be all that you can handle. Right now I have 3 or 4 I need to mill up before I begin moving the saw. I am trying to decide what to mill these logs to because I don't yet know what I am doing with them. You could easily wind up in the same situation with just a few logs.


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.

I buy cheap tools until I really learn what I need, then get good ones. I bought a very cheap moisture meter on fleabay ($15) and thought it would at least give me an idea. I brought some wood to a friend for planing and he insisted that nothing went in his planer that was over 15%. Mine said 14% and his said 13%. His cost $300., mine cost $15. and my confidence is higher.


Good point, I'll try a cheapy model when I'm ready for one and see what I really need and then go from there.

Basically I need to stop overthinking it, accept that "mistakes" will be made which is ok (provided they don't involve some horrid injury) and just enjoy the learning process :P
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #65 on: November 08, 2019, 07:55:30 PM »

I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.


I picked a couple of your points out to respond to, but I am not so good at the fancy quoting as you are.
 First, there really aren't and 'mistakes' as I see it, they are all learning experiences and add to you skill and knowledge.
Search for "benches" here are the FF. there are a LOT of us building them and learning and trading ideas as we go. There are some in my long thread.
You can grab one of those boards anytime and get to work on it after you find some ideas. @WV Sawmiller @arkansas and @doc henderson and others have some good ones in their post history. I did one from green wood back in June and sealed it before it could dry. Gave it to a neighbor, been watching it for movement, nothing yet.
 Funny thing about that cheap MC meter I have, after I got it, I started sticking it in everything. Sometimes I would stick a butt log 5 minutes after I dropped it. I learned a lot about trees and logs. I marked logs with the initial MC and would watch them. I would go back and stick the same log for weeks after I cut it just to sees how things progressed, then when I milled it, then as it was air drying. It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. :D ;D I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club.
Next for me is a metal detector. I'll let you know how it works out. I'm worried about going cheap on that one.
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #66 on: November 08, 2019, 09:36:59 PM »
"It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club."

I prefer a moisture meter and 2 beers for entertainment! @Old Greenhorn @ManjiSann  :D :) 8) smiley_beertoast
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #67 on: November 09, 2019, 07:08:06 AM »

I guess I'm trying to cheat and not make "mistakes" but the only way to learn is by trying and things won't always go how I wanted but it's not a bad thing so long as I learn from it :)  


I was originally thinking an arts and crafts type chair, so I guess finely joined furniture was in my head, but I think the rustic stuff may be more my speed right now. I'll have to start googling it and see what I find :) Thanks for the idea!


To be completely honest I'm already in that situation right now :D I'm not certain what I'll use the pear boards for or even why I'm making boards other than it's fun as can be to run a chainsaw, make man glitter and come out with a nice board after. I figure what to do with the wood will come to me once it's dry, though I am trying to get some sort of idea going.


I picked a couple of your points out to respond to, but I am not so good at the fancy quoting as you are.
 First, there really aren't and 'mistakes' as I see it, they are all learning experiences and add to you skill and knowledge.
Search for "benches" here are the FF. there are a LOT of us building them and learning and trading ideas as we go. There are some in my long thread.
You can grab one of those boards anytime and get to work on it after you find some ideas. @WV Sawmiller @arkansas and @doc henderson and others have some good ones in their post history. I did one from green wood back in June and sealed it before it could dry. Gave it to a neighbor, been watching it for movement, nothing yet.
 Funny thing about that cheap MC meter I have, after I got it, I started sticking it in everything. Sometimes I would stick a butt log 5 minutes after I dropped it. I learned a lot about trees and logs. I marked logs with the initial MC and would watch them. I would go back and stick the same log for weeks after I cut it just to sees how things progressed, then when I milled it, then as it was air drying. It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. :D ;D I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club.
Next for me is a metal detector. I'll let you know how it works out. I'm worried about going cheap on that one.
@Old Greenhorn  I used the multi quote button, it was an experiment to see if it would do what I thought it would and it did but I'm not sure I really liked it. 
You are absolutely right, there are no mistakes. I have a bit of a perfectionist streak and sometimes I let it get the better of me, as though somehow I'll get everything right the first time  ::) ::) It does take a lot of the fun out of things at times. Instead of doing that I really like your attitude about it all, try it, see what happens and learn from the results. 
HAHAHA the image I have of you with that moisture meter sticking it everywhere is like a kid with a new magnifying glass examining everything, just a fun image!  :) :)  Really I like your attitude for learning and exploration!
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o  So far I haven't found anything like that the hard way thankfully but, not trying to sound negative or fatalistic but just figure it's how the odds work, I'm sure I will at some point since I'm working with yard trees. 
Thanks again for the pep talk!
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #68 on: November 09, 2019, 07:10:46 AM »
"It was really cheap entertainment and a fascinating education. (Image hidden from quote, click to view.) (Image hidden from quote, click to view.) I learned a LOT about how wood dries and continue to learn. Somebody will write something in a post that is a bit over my head, and I will investigate it on my own until I begin to understand. All for 15 bucks. Cheaper than 2 beers at a club."

I prefer a moisture meter and 2 beers for entertainment! @Old Greenhorn @ManjiSann  :D :) 8) smiley_beertoast
@doc henderson how many beers before you check the beers with the moisture meter?  ;D ;D
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #69 on: November 09, 2019, 07:14:52 AM »
Found an ad for a local tree service offering free logs. Texted and called yesterday but no reply yet but keeping my fingers crossed they'll contact me back. Would be cool to pick up a few more logs to mill  8)  If this one doesn't pan out it's no big deal. A couple of my neighbors work for construction companies and I'm going to talk to them and see if they take trees down and if so if they'd be willing to send the logs my way. 


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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #70 on: November 09, 2019, 08:22:20 AM »
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o
From what I have learned here on the FF, you want to stay away from the pinpoint as a first detector, they are too focused. You have to go over every inch of the log, all around. You want something more broad spectrum first to locate metal, then if you want, work on it with a finer point. You can search the subject here on the FF, there is a good discussion somewhere, but at the time I read it, that was not an urgent consideration. Now that I have found barbed wire (the hard way) I am re-thinking.
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I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #71 on: November 09, 2019, 08:40:41 AM »
Brandon  I purchased a cheapie used  HF metal detector from ebay.  It works fine,  mostly it's to check the utility poles I've sawn and any town logs I saw.  I have found some stuff I didn't see with it so it paid for itself in two uses.  Yes a basic moisture detector is on my list too to see where I'm at with some bench slabs.  The rest of what I've sawn is siding and structural stuff the will air dry for two years or so til I get to those projects.

That tree service  deal  might surprise you at how much wood you'll be blessed with.   You'll be looking for an empty spot on the outside of town before too long.

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #72 on: November 09, 2019, 08:42:56 AM »
The Lumber Wizard is a good starting point for metal detectors.  Lumber Wizard

Some people use the type used for finding artifacts in the ground.  Some use both.  X-ray is the only fool-proof method, but that's a bit pricey.

A brand new blade is the most reliable way to find metal in a log for most of us bandmill operators.   :D :D

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #73 on: November 09, 2019, 08:58:59 AM »
For sealing the ends, you might want to consider the dregs of scented candles. The cheapies usually don't burn fully, so you can use the remainder as a sealer. Make the wife happy too. For multiquoting, IMO it's easier to quote the whole mess, then add quote tags to break it up, and delete stuff that isn't needed.

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #74 on: November 09, 2019, 09:03:01 AM »
the big service always tries to give the wood away, and my experience when I have spoke with them is that they hear it all the time, and then people do not show up.  so they are prob. not as excited as you are.  I have several small one man tree guys, and it is like Christmas when they text a pic.  One guy will drop them off if he has the equipment. or I will pick it up.  that is where I got the locust to make my log cradle to cut firewood, and the one that I found concrete down the center.
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #75 on: November 09, 2019, 11:10:34 AM »
I am thinking of trying to get one of those Garmin (I think that's who makes them) pinpointing metal detectors to try and find metal in a log before I mill it... would be nice to not use the chain as the metal detector  :(  :o
From what I have learned here on the FF, you want to stay away from the pinpoint as a first detector, they are too focused. You have to go over every inch of the log, all around. You want something more broad spectrum first to locate metal, then if you want, work on it with a finer point. You can search the subject here on the FF, there is a good discussion somewhere, but at the time I read it, that was not an urgent consideration. Now that I have found barbed wire (the hard way) I am re-thinking.
I will do a search as you say, thanks for pointing it out :)

I ordered a Dr.Meter MD912 off eBay, had a $10 coupon so it only cost me $7 :)  Should be here in a couple weeks. 

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #76 on: November 09, 2019, 11:14:52 AM »
Brandon  I purchased a cheapie used  HF metal detector from ebay.  It works fine,  mostly it's to check the utility poles I've sawn and any town logs I saw.  I have found some stuff I didn't see with it so it paid for itself in two uses.  Yes a basic moisture detector is on my list too to see where I'm at with some bench slabs.  The rest of what I've sawn is siding and structural stuff the will air dry for two years or so til I get to those projects.

That tree service  deal  might surprise you at how much wood you'll be blessed with.   You'll be looking for an empty spot on the outside of town before too long.
I looked at HF and their basic detector is priced such that it'd only have to save two chains to pay for itself. I think I'll be saving my pennies and waiting for a coupon and will have to pick one up.  I don't expect I'll be sawing utility poles but since so far all my logs have been yard logs I think it'd be a good investment :)
No word back from the tree service, I may try and call them one more time after work just to see. I don't have the money for any land anywhere so I hope it stays within what I can handle, but I suppose an excess of logs isn't such a bad problem to have :D
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #77 on: November 09, 2019, 11:18:01 AM »
For sealing the ends, you might want to consider the dregs of scented candles. The cheapies usually don't burn fully, so you can use the remainder as a sealer. Make the wife happy too. 
Oddly enough my wife doesn't do scented candles so I have to buy the wax. It's really not very expensive IMO.

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #78 on: November 09, 2019, 11:22:01 AM »
the big service always tries to give the wood away, and my experience when I have spoke with them is that they hear it all the time, and then people do not show up.  so they are prob. not as excited as you are.  I have several small one man tree guys, and it is like Christmas when they text a pic.  One guy will drop them off if he has the equipment. or I will pick it up.  that is where I got the locust to make my log cradle to cut firewood, and the one that I found concrete down the center.
Good perspective to keep in mind when dealing with the tree guys, thanks Doc :)  It'd be pretty awesome to get in good enough with one or two such that they'd text me a "interested in this one?" pic and message, that would be like Christmas!  8)  I figure it'll take some time to cultivate contacts... I'd like to say I'm in no hurry but y'all know I'd be lying, I'm chomping at the bit!  ;D ;D  But I'm trying to have patience and as OG said, just see what comes my way and enjoy the ride.
Brandon 
Poulan Pro 5020AV, Husky 390XP

Offline ljohnsaw

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #79 on: November 09, 2019, 12:01:05 PM »
ManjiSann,
If you are planning (hoping) to get some bigger logs, you are going to need a way to move them.  You are gonna need a log arch of some sort.  In keeping with your free/scrap mantra, here is something I made (and remade) to move my timbers and lumber but was originally built to move some redwood logs.

A simple log arch...
John Sawicky

Just North-East of Sacramento...

SkyTrak 9038, Davis Little Monster backhoe, Case 16+4 Trencher, Home Built 42" capacity/32" cut Bandmill up to 54' long - using it all to build a timber frame cabin.


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