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Author Topic: Elderly lady from New Brunswick puts family woodlot in conservation easement  (Read 2146 times)

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Robena Weatherly, a forest pathologist, who has studied mountain pine beetle in the 50's has sold her family woodlot to Community Forest International. They bought the 350-acre property (about 141 hectares) through its carbon offset program. The original family land grant dates to 1812. She has refused many offers for harvesting her timber over the years. Carbon offsetting is the latest trend in recent years up this way, but realistically very few in numbers doing it.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/carbon-offset-community-forest-international-acadian-forest-1.5341061
Move'n on.

Offline Stephen1

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Very interesting article and a way to store Carbon. i would like to see more of that and I bet we will see it spread
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Offline SwampDonkey

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I think hardwood and white pine ground possibly, but not fir, aspen, white birch ground. Yes, I could see it on land with the right forest covertype with long lived species. I still think it will be very few in numbers though.

Most of what is south of Fredericton is low lands unless you find a hill up out of the swamp. Grand Lake is a huge forest swamp.

The New Brunswick government bent from nearly 30 % no touch to maybe 12 %. And now they are thinking of going back to 27%, but that difference has already been clear cut. And a lot of that 12 % was what anyone would call low productivity forest, not prime ground. The 18% they took was the good stuff. Chase the money. :D
Move'n on.

Offline mitchstockdale

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I just shake my head at this non sense.... the old carbon scam..
Do today what others wont, so you can do tomorrow what others cant.

Kubota MX5200 / Norse 366 / Stihl MS361

Offline moosehunter

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Conservation easements are very common in NY. People want to try to save $$$ on property taxes and that is one way to do it. Of course then you have lost the ability to choose what you want to do with your land. 

If you want to store carbon, cut the tree down and build something permanent with it thereby storing the carbon. Then plant another tree. Seems pretty simple to me 😉

mh
"And the days that I keep my gratitude
Higher than my expectations
Well, I have really good days".    Ray Wylie Hubbard

Offline ID4ster

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Sooooo what happens when the trees mature and start to decay which will release more carbon then they are taking in? Old growth doesn't sequester carbon in the quantities and rate that younger growing stems do. If those trees are already 200+ years old some of them are going to start going downhill soon if they haven't started already.  Just goes to show that Foresters have to know more about pathology and entomology that those scientists know about forest management. 

This may bring comfort to the landowner and some revenue but she could have reached her sequestrations goals better if she'd listened to a good forest manager rather than a carbon credit dealer.

The really frightening thing is that all this focus on global warming and "climate change" is taking away resources and awareness of the real threat to our forests, waters and rangelands and that threat is for more insidious, damaging and immediate than global warming will ever be.
Bob Hassoldt
Seven Ridges Forestry
Kendrick, Idaho
Want to improve your woodlot the fastest way? Start thinning, believe me it needs it.

Offline SwampDonkey

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I read a comment recently about the methane scare from all the paper grocery bags rotting away after use. I said there was far more wood rotting in the forest than from grocery bags. :D But then maybe we want plastic bags hanging in the trees instead. ;)
Move'n on.

Offline sealark37

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The sad truth about easements and gifts to "conservancies" is the certain tendency of such transactions to cheat heirs and assigns of the monetary value of their inheritance.  Attempts to control real estate from the grave are sad exercises in self-delusion.  No matter what restrictions are added to deeds, or what solemn promises are made by "Our Board",  the land in question can, and will, be freed at some point in time for the benefit of the non-heir.  All it takes is a bankruptcy or a flexible judge to subvert the intent of the original grantor.  There is no fool like an old fool.

Offline peakbagger

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I will agree with you on deeded restrictions, once the original seller is out of the picture there is no way of enforcing the restrictions. Folks think there is lot more teeth in a long term restriction but in order for someone to enforce it they need standing in court and getting that standing is tough. On the other hand depending on the state having an easement through non profit organization can be a lot longer term option. The problem is that setting up the easement up front costs money and most parties want to get out of it cheap. There is lot of paperwork cost but the big cost is the easement has to be set up with an "endowment" to ensure that there is long term way of funding a third party to ensure that the restrictions are enforced. 

The other way the restrictions  get ruined is if the government needs or wants the property. Easements and deed restriction usually are null and void once the government buys or seizes it via eminent domain. In some cases this is used by politically connected folks where they get a government entity to grab the land and then resell it.  

Offline farmfromkansas

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Was looking at TV listings and saw a program on KPTS about climate change.  At least I can choose not to watch it, but bet our grandkids are brainwashed with this garbage in school. I told one of my granddaughters not everything you learn in school is true, and she gave me a look?

Offline KEC

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moosehunter stole my response about storing the carbon by using lumber to build buildings. I'll go one further and say they should go back to sawing framing with full 2" which would store more carbon and fewer nails would miss the studs. My former insurance agent told me that many houses that are destroyed by winds, when inspected after the wind event, are found to have many nails which missed the studs. When nailed  with a nail gun it's hard to tell when you miss those 1 5/8'' studs.

Offline SwampDonkey

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Today's hardware won't fit 2" thick pieces, so all those manufacturers would need to change to. They can tell if a stud isn't hit with a nail gun though. A lot of times the gable ends of those multi-roofed houses are not studded in like the rest of the house and the inspectors pass that. That's your biggest trouble. Not rigid enough for high winds.
Move'n on.


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